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Author Steinbach, R.; Perkins, C.; Tompson, L.; Johnson, S.; Armstrong, B.; Green, J.; Grundy, C.; Wilkinson, P.; Edwards, P.
Title (up) The effect of reduced street lighting on road casualties and crime in England and Wales: controlled interrupted time series analysis Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Journal of Epidemiology Community Health Abbreviated Journal J. Epidemiol. Community Health
Volume 69 Issue 11 Pages
Keywords Safety; public safety; England; Wales; United Kindgom; traffic safety; street lighting; outdoor lighting; crime; security; light adaptation strategies
Abstract Background: Many local authorities in England and Wales have reduced street lighting at night to save money and reduce carbon emissions. There is no evidence to date on whether these reductions impact on public health. We quantified the effect of 4 street lighting adaptation strategies (switch off, part-night lighting, dimming and white light) on casualties and crime in England and Wales.

Methods: Observational study based on analysis of geographically coded police data on road traffic collisions and crime in 62 local authorities. Conditional Poisson models were used to analyse longitudinal changes in the counts of night-time collisions occurring on affected roads during 2000–2013, and crime within census Middle Super Output Areas during 2010–2013. Effect estimates were adjusted for regional temporal trends in casualties and crime.

Results: There was no evidence that any street lighting adaptation strategy was associated with a change in collisions at night. There was significant statistical heterogeneity in the effects on crime estimated at police force level. Overall, there was no evidence for an association between the aggregate count of crime and switch off (RR 0.11; 95% CI 0.01 to 2.75) or part-night lighting (RR 0.96; 95% CI 0.86 to 1.06). There was weak evidence for a reduction in the aggregate count of crime and dimming (RR 0.84; 95% CI 0.70 to 1.02) and white light (RR 0.89; 95% CI 0.77 to 1.03).

Conclusions: This study found little evidence of harmful effects of switch off, part-night lighting, dimming, or changes to white light/LEDs on road collisions or crime in England and Wales.
Address Department of Population Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK; Phil.Edwards(at)lshtm.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher BMJ Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1470-2738 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1224
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Author Davidovic, M.; Djokic, L.; Cabarkapa, A.; Kostic, M.
Title (up) Warm white versus neutral white LED street lighting: Pedestrians' impressions Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology
Volume in press Issue Pages 147715351880429
Keywords Psychology; Security
Abstract The subjective impressions of pedestrians are necessary in order to decide on the appropriate colour of light to be used for street lighting. Therefore, a pilot project aimed to compare subjective evaluations of the sidewalk illumination under two street lighting installations, realised by LEDs of 3000 K (warm white) and 4000 K (neutral white), was recently conducted in Belgrade. Both installations had comparable sidewalk illuminances as well as other relevant photometric parameters. The evaluation was done through a questionnaire. A group of 139 (61 male and 78 female) respondents, all of them university students, was asked to grade both lighting installations for the sidewalk light intensity, the appearance of human faces, the colour of light and the colour rendering as well as the overall impression. According to the median values, the 3000 K LED installation was considered better than the 4000 K installation for all aspects assessed as well as the overall impression. Although the survey results convincingly showed a preference for 3000 K LEDs for this comparison, additional research is needed using a more representative sample of people and a wider range of locations before a definite conclusion can be reached.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2045
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Author Marchant, P.R.
Title (up) Why Lighting Claims Might Well Be Wrong Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Abbreviated Journal Intl J of Sustainable Lighting
Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 69-74
Keywords Security; Crime; lighting; regulation
Abstract This paper gives some background to claims of benefit from road lighting and why large beneficial claims may be suspect. It places this in the context of general concerns about the unreliability of claims in science using knowledge gained, particularly from investigations in the field of health-care. It points to the need to plan, proceed and check science in unbiased and rigorous ways. It gives recommendations for more transparency, asks for clear protocols to be produced in advance, that clear reports are written which follow appropriate reporting guidelines and that the data is accessible.
Address Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, United Kingdom LS1 3HE; P.Marchant(at)leedsbeckett.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher IJSL Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1678
Permanent link to this record