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Author Foster, R.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Neurobiology: bright blue times Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 433 Issue 7027 Pages 698-699  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Circadian Rhythm/physiology/radiation effects; Color Perception/physiology/*radiation effects; Humans; *Light; Light Signal Transduction/*radiation effects; Mice; Retinal Ganglion Cells/cytology/physiology/radiation effects; Retinaldehyde/chemistry/metabolism; Rod Opsins/*metabolism; NASA Discipline Space Human Factors; Non-NASA Center  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication (up) Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:15716938 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 750  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jasser, S.A.; Blask, D.E.; Brainard, G.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light during darkness and cancer: relationships in circadian photoreception and tumor biology Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Cancer Causes & Control : CCC Abbreviated Journal Cancer Causes Control  
  Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 515-523  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; *Circadian Rhythm; *Darkness; Humans; *Light; Light Signal Transduction; Melatonin/physiology/secretion; Neoplasms/etiology/pathology/*physiopathology; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus/physiology  
  Abstract The relationship between circadian phototransduction and circadian-regulated processes is poorly understood. Melatonin, commonly a circadian phase marker, may play a direct role in a myriad of physiologic processes. The circadian rhythm for pineal melatonin secretion is regulated by the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Its neural source of light input is a unique subset of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells expressing melanopsin, the primary circadian photopigment in rodents and primates. Action spectra of melatonin suppression by light have shown that light in the 446-477 nm range, distinct from the visual system's peak sensitivity, is optimal for stimulating the human circadian system. Breast cancer is the oncological disease entity whose relationship to circadian rhythm fluctuations has perhaps been most extensively studied. Empirical data has increasingly supported the hypothesis that higher risk of breast cancer in industrialized countries is partly due to increased exposure to light at night. Studies of tumor biology implicate melatonin as a potential mediator of this effect. Yet, causality between lifestyle factors and circadian tumor biology remains elusive and likely reflects significant variability with physiologic context. Continued rigorous empirical inquiry into the physiology and clinical implications of these habitual, integrated aspects of life is highly warranted at this time.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Light Research Program, Thomas Jefferson University, 1025 Walnut Street, Suite 507, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. samar.jasser@jefferson.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication (up) Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0957-5243 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16596305 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 766  
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