toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Wright, K.P.J.; Hull, J.T.; Czeisler, C.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Relationship between alertness, performance, and body temperature in humans Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication (up) American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol  
  Volume 283 Issue 6 Pages R1370-7  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; Attention/*physiology; *Body Temperature; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Cognition/*physiology; Female; Humans; Male; Memory/physiology; Reaction Time; Sleep/physiology; Time Factors; Wakefulness/physiology; NASA Discipline Regulatory Physiology; Non-NASA Center  
  Abstract Body temperature has been reported to influence human performance. Performance is reported to be better when body temperature is high/near its circadian peak and worse when body temperature is low/near its circadian minimum. We assessed whether this relationship between performance and body temperature reflects the regulation of both the internal biological timekeeping system and/or the influence of body temperature on performance independent of circadian phase. Fourteen subjects participated in a forced desynchrony protocol allowing assessment of the relationship between body temperature and performance while controlling for circadian phase and hours awake. Most neurobehavioral measures varied as a function of internal biological time and duration of wakefulness. A number of performance measures were better when body temperature was elevated, including working memory, subjective alertness, visual attention, and the slowest 10% of reaction times. These findings demonstrate that an increased body temperature, associated with and independent of internal biological time, is correlated with improved performance and alertness. These results support the hypothesis that body temperature modulates neurobehavioral function in humans.  
  Address Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. kenneth.wright@colorado.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0363-6119 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:12388468 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 835  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wood, B.; Rea, M.S.; Plitnick, B.; Figueiro, M.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light level and duration of exposure determine the impact of self-luminous tablets on melatonin suppression Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication (up) Applied Ergonomics Abbreviated Journal Appl Ergon  
  Volume 44 Issue 2 Pages 237-240  
  Keywords Adolescent; *Computers, Handheld; Female; Humans; Light/*adverse effects; Male; Melatonin/*biosynthesis; Photoperiod; Saliva/*metabolism; Sleep/radiation effects; Time Factors; Young Adult; melatonin  
  Abstract Exposure to light from self-luminous displays may be linked to increased risk for sleep disorders because these devices emit optical radiation at short wavelengths, close to the peak sensitivity of melatonin suppression. Thirteen participants experienced three experimental conditions in a within-subjects design to investigate the impact of self-luminous tablet displays on nocturnal melatonin suppression: 1) tablets-only set to the highest brightness, 2) tablets viewed through clear-lens goggles equipped with blue light-emitting diodes that provided 40 lux of 470-nm light at the cornea, and 3) tablets viewed through orange-tinted glasses (dark control; optical radiation <525 nm approximately 0). Melatonin suppressions after 1-h and 2-h exposures to tablets viewed with the blue light were significantly greater than zero. Suppression levels after 1-h exposure to the tablets-only were not statistically different than zero; however, this difference reached significance after 2 h. Based on these results, display manufacturers can determine how their products will affect melatonin levels and use model predictions to tune the spectral power distribution of self-luminous devices to increase or to decrease stimulation to the circadian system.  
  Address Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 21 Union Street, Troy, NY 12180, USA. woodb5@rpi.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-6870 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22850476 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 136  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zukauskas, A.; Vaicekauskas, R.; Vitta, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Optimization of solid-state lamps for photobiologically friendly mesopic lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication (up) Applied Optics Abbreviated Journal Appl Opt  
  Volume 51 Issue 35 Pages 8423-8432  
  Keywords Lighting Systems; Circadian Rhythm; Color; Equipment Design; Humans; Light; *Lighting; Melatonin/metabolism; Photobiology/*methods; Semiconductors; Time Factors; Vision, Ocular  
  Abstract The circadian and visual-performance-based mesopic systems of photometry were applied for the optimization of the spectral power distributions (SPDs) of the solid-state sources of light for low-illuminance lighting applications. At mesopic adaptation luminances typical of outdoor lighting (0.1-2 cd/m(2)), the optimal SPDs were obtained through the minimization of the mesopic circadian action factor, which is the ratio of the circadian efficacy of radiation to mesopic luminous efficacy of radiation. For correlated color temperatures below ~3000 K, the optimized dichromatic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are shown to pose a lower circadian hazard than high-pressure sodium lamps and common warm white LEDs; also they are potentially more efficacious and have acceptable color rendition properties under mesopic conditions.  
  Address Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, Vilnius LT-10222, Lithuania. arturas.zukauskas@ff.vu.lt  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-6935 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23262538 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 448  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Arendt, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Biological rhythms during residence in polar regions Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication (up) Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 29 Issue 4 Pages 379-394  
  Keywords *Acclimatization; Activities of Daily Living; Affect; Antarctic Regions; Arctic Regions; *Biological Clocks; *Circadian Rhythm; *Cold Climate; *Cold Temperature; Energy Metabolism; Feeding Behavior; Humans; Melatonin/metabolism; Personnel Staffing and Scheduling; *Photoperiod; Seasonal Affective Disorder/physiopathology/prevention & control/psychology; *Seasons; Sleep; Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/etiology/physiopathology/*prevention & control/psychology; Time Factors; Workload; Workplace  
  Abstract At Arctic and Antarctic latitudes, personnel are deprived of natural sunlight in winter and have continuous daylight in summer: light of sufficient intensity and suitable spectral composition is the main factor that maintains the 24-h period of human circadian rhythms. Thus, the status of the circadian system is of interest. Moreover, the relatively controlled artificial light conditions in winter are conducive to experimentation with different types of light treatment. The hormone melatonin and/or its metabolite 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) provide probably the best index of circadian (and seasonal) timing. A frequent observation has been a delay of the circadian system in winter. A skeleton photoperiod (2 x 1-h, bright white light, morning and evening) can restore summer timing. A single 1-h pulse of light in the morning may be sufficient. A few people desynchronize from the 24-h day (free-run) and show their intrinsic circadian period, usually >24 h. With regard to general health in polar regions, intermittent reports describe abnormalities in various physiological processes from the point of view of daily and seasonal rhythms, but positive health outcomes are also published. True winter depression (SAD) appears to be rare, although subsyndromal SAD is reported. Probably of most concern are the numerous reports of sleep problems. These have prompted investigations of the underlying mechanisms and treatment interventions. A delay of the circadian system with “normal” working hours implies sleep is attempted at a suboptimal phase. Decrements in sleep efficiency, latency, duration, and quality are also seen in winter. Increasing the intensity of ambient light exposure throughout the day advanced circadian phase and was associated with benefits for sleep: blue-enriched light was slightly more effective than standard white light. Effects on performance remain to be fully investigated. At 75 degrees S, base personnel adapt the circadian system to night work within a week, in contrast to temperate zones where complete adaptation rarely occurs. A similar situation occurs on high-latitude North Sea oil installations, especially when working 18:00-06:00 h. Lack of conflicting light exposure (and “social obligations”) is the probable explanation. Many have problems returning to day work, showing circadian desynchrony. Timed light treatment again has helped to restore normal phase/sleep in a small number of people. Postprandial response to meals is compromised during periods of desynchrony with evidence of insulin resistance and elevated triglycerides, risk factors for heart disease. Only small numbers of subjects have been studied intensively in polar regions; however, these observations suggest that suboptimal light conditions are deleterious to health. They apply equally to people living in temperate zones with insufficient light exposure.  
  Address Centre for Chronobiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, UK. arendtjo@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22497433; PMCID:PMC3793275 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 143  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Vollmer, C.; Michel, U.; Randler, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Outdoor light at night (LAN) is correlated with eveningness in adolescents Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication (up) Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 29 Issue 4 Pages 502-508  
  Keywords Adolescent; *Adolescent Behavior/drug effects; Biological Clocks; Central Nervous System Stimulants/administration & dosage; *Circadian Rhythm/drug effects; Computers; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Germany; Humans; *Light; Lighting; Male; *Photic Stimulation; *Photoperiod; Questionnaires; *Sleep/drug effects; Television; Time Factors; Video Games; *Wakefulness/drug effects  
  Abstract External zeitgebers synchronize the human circadian rhythm of sleep and wakefulness. Humans adapt their chronotype to the day-night cycle, the strongest external zeitgeber. The human circadian rhythm shifts to evening-type orientation when daylight is prolonged into the evening and night hours by artificial light sources. Data from a survey of 1507 German adolescents covering questions about chronotype and electronic screen media use combined with nocturnal satellite image data suggest a relationship between chronotype and artificial nocturnal light. Adolescents living in brightly illuminated urban districts had a stronger evening-type orientation than adolescents living in darker and more rural municipalities. This result persisted when controlling for time use of electronic screen media, intake of stimulants, type of school, age, puberty status, time of sunrise, sex, and population density. Time spent on electronic screen media use-a source of indoor light at night-is also correlated with eveningness, as well as intake of stimulants, age, and puberty status, and, to a lesser degree, type of school and time of sunrise. Adequate urban development design and parents limiting adolescents' electronic screen media use in the evening could help to adjust adolescents' zeitgeber to early school schedules when they provide appropriate lighting conditions for daytime and for nighttime.  
  Address Department of Biology, University of Education Heidelberg, Germany. vollmer@ph-heidelberg.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22214237 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 150  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: