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Author Bedrosian, T.A.; Vaughn, C.A.; Galan, A.; Daye, G.; Weil, Z.M.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nocturnal light exposure impairs affective responses in a wavelength-dependent manner Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication The Journal of Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal J Neurosci  
  Volume 33 Issue 32 Pages 13081-13087  
  Keywords Analysis of Variance; Animals; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Cricetinae; Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation; Female; Food Deprivation/physiology; Food Preferences/physiology/radiation effects; Fourier Analysis; Gene Expression Regulation/radiation effects; Hippocampus/pathology/radiation effects; Immobility Response, Tonic/radiation effects; Light/*adverse effects; Mood Disorders/*etiology/pathology; Motor Activity/physiology/radiation effects; Phodopus; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-fos/metabolism; Social Behavior; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus/metabolism; Time Factors  
  Abstract Life on earth is entrained to a 24 h solar cycle that synchronizes circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior; light is the most potent entraining cue. In mammals, light is detected by (1) rods and cones, which mediate visual function, and (2) intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), which primarily project to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the hypothalamus to regulate circadian rhythms. Recent evidence, however, demonstrates that ipRGCs also project to limbic brain regions, suggesting that, through this pathway, light may have a role in cognition and mood. Therefore, it follows that unnatural exposure to light may have negative consequences for mood or behavior. Modern environmental lighting conditions have led to excessive exposure to light at night (LAN), and particularly to blue wavelength lights. We hypothesized that nocturnal light exposure (i.e., dim LAN) would induce depressive responses and alter neuronal structure in hamsters (Phodopus sungorus). If this effect is mediated by ipRGCs, which have reduced sensitivity to red wavelength light, then we predicted that red LAN would have limited effects on brain and behavior compared with shorter wavelengths. Additionally, red LAN would not induce c-Fos activation in the SCN. Our results demonstrate that exposure to LAN influences behavior and neuronal plasticity and that this effect is likely mediated by ipRGCs. Modern sources of LAN that contain blue wavelengths may be particularly disruptive to the circadian system, potentially contributing to altered mood regulation.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA. Bedrosian.2@osu.edu  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0270-6474 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23926261 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 27  
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Author Rockhill, A.P.; DePerno, C.S.; Powell, R.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of illumination and time of day on movements of bobcats (Lynx rufus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 8 Issue 7 Pages e69213  
  Keywords Animals; Female; *Lighting; Lynx/*physiology; Male; Moon; Movement/*physiology; North Carolina; Time Factors; Wetlands  
  Abstract Understanding behavioral changes of prey and predators based on lunar illumination provides insight into important life history, behavioral ecology, and survival information. The objectives of this research were to determine if bobcat movement rates differed by period of day (dark, moon, crepuscular, day), lunar illumination (<10%, 10 – <50%, 50 – <90%, >90%), and moon phase (new, full). Bobcats had high movement rates during crepuscular and day periods and low movement rates during dark periods with highest nighttime rates at 10-<50% lunar illumination. Bobcats had highest movement rates during daytime when nighttime illumination was low (new moon) and higher movement rates during nighttime when lunar illumination was high (full moon). The behaviors we observed are consistent with prey availability being affected by light level and by limited vision by bobcats during darkness.  
  Address Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA. aimee_rockhill@ncsu.edu  
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  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23861963; PMCID:PMC3704646 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 84  
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Author Owens, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Obesity: heavy sleepers Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 497 Issue 7450 Pages S8-9  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Body Mass Index; CLOCK Proteins/genetics/metabolism; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Energy Metabolism/*physiology; Ghrelin/metabolism; Humans; Insulin Resistance/physiology; Leptin/metabolism; Male; Mice; Obesity/*physiopathology; Satiety Response/physiology; Sleep/*physiology; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus/physiology; Time Factors; Weight Gain/physiology; Weight Loss/physiology  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23698508 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 503  
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Author Dukic, T.; Ahlstrom, C.; Patten, C.; Kettwich, C.; Kircher, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of electronic billboards on driver distraction Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Traffic Injury Prevention Abbreviated Journal Traffic Inj Prev  
  Volume 14 Issue 5 Pages 469-476  
  Keywords Adult; Advertising as Topic/*methods; *Attention; Automobile Driving/*psychology; Eye Movements; Humans; Middle Aged; Psychomotor Performance; Sweden; Time Factors  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: There is an increase in electronic advertising billboards along major roads, which may cause driver distraction due to the highly conspicuous design of the electronic billboards. Yet limited research on the impact of electronic billboards on driving performance and driver behavior is available. The Swedish Transport Administration recently approved the installation of 12 electronic billboards for a trial period along a 3-lane motorway with heavy traffic running through central Stockholm, Sweden. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of these electronic billboards on visual behavior and driving performance. METHOD: A total of 41 drivers were recruited to drive an instrumented vehicle passing 4 of the electronic billboards during day and night conditions. A driver was considered visually distracted when looking at a billboard continuously for more than 2 s or if the driver looked away from the road for a high percentage of time. Dependent variables were eye-tracking measures and driving performance measures. RESULTS: The visual behavior data showed that drivers had a significantly longer dwell time, a greater number of fixations, and longer maximum fixation duration when driving past an electronic billboard compared to other signs on the same road stretches. No differences were found for the factors day/night, and no effect was found for the driving behavior data. CONCLUSION: Electronic billboards have an effect on gaze behavior by attracting more and longer glances than regular traffic signs. Whether the electronic billboards attract too much attention and constitute a traffic safety hazard cannot be answered conclusively based on the present data.  
  Address Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linkoping, Sweden. tania.dukic@vti.se  
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  ISSN 1538-9588 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:23682577 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 247  
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Author Zukauskas, A.; Vaicekauskas, R.; Vitta, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Optimization of solid-state lamps for photobiologically friendly mesopic lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Applied Optics Abbreviated Journal Appl Opt  
  Volume 51 Issue 35 Pages 8423-8432  
  Keywords Lighting Systems; Circadian Rhythm; Color; Equipment Design; Humans; Light; *Lighting; Melatonin/metabolism; Photobiology/*methods; Semiconductors; Time Factors; Vision, Ocular  
  Abstract The circadian and visual-performance-based mesopic systems of photometry were applied for the optimization of the spectral power distributions (SPDs) of the solid-state sources of light for low-illuminance lighting applications. At mesopic adaptation luminances typical of outdoor lighting (0.1-2 cd/m(2)), the optimal SPDs were obtained through the minimization of the mesopic circadian action factor, which is the ratio of the circadian efficacy of radiation to mesopic luminous efficacy of radiation. For correlated color temperatures below ~3000 K, the optimized dichromatic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are shown to pose a lower circadian hazard than high-pressure sodium lamps and common warm white LEDs; also they are potentially more efficacious and have acceptable color rendition properties under mesopic conditions.  
  Address Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, Vilnius LT-10222, Lithuania. arturas.zukauskas@ff.vu.lt  
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  ISSN 0003-6935 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23262538 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 448  
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