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Author Hale, J.D.; Davies, G.; Fairbrass, A.J.; Matthews, T.J.; Rogers, C.D.F.; Sadler, J.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mapping lightscapes: spatial patterning of artificial lighting in an urban landscape Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 8 Issue 5 Pages e61460  
  Keywords *Cities; England; Environmental Pollution; Geographic Mapping; Humans; Light; *Lighting; Photography; Urban Population; *Urbanization  
  Abstract Artificial lighting is strongly associated with urbanisation and is increasing in its extent, brightness and spectral range. Changes in urban lighting have both positive and negative effects on city performance, yet little is known about how its character and magnitude vary across the urban landscape. A major barrier to related research, planning and governance has been the lack of lighting data at the city extent, particularly at a fine spatial resolution. Our aims were therefore to capture such data using aerial night photography and to undertake a case study of urban lighting. We present the finest scale multi-spectral lighting dataset available for an entire city and explore how lighting metrics vary with built density and land-use. We found positive relationships between artificial lighting indicators and built density at coarse spatial scales, whilst at a local level lighting varied with land-use. Manufacturing and housing are the primary land-use zones responsible for the city's brightly lit areas, yet manufacturing sites are relatively rare within the city. Our data suggests that efforts to address light pollution should broaden their focus from residential street lighting to include security lighting within manufacturing areas.  
  Address School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, West Midlands, United Kingdom. j.hale@bham.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23671566; PMCID:PMC3646000 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 209  
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Author Kloog, I.; Haim, A.; Stevens, R.G.; Portnov, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Global co-distribution of light at night (LAN) and cancers of prostate, colon, and lung in men Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 26 Issue 1 Pages 108-125  
  Keywords Circadian Rhythm; Colonic Neoplasms/*epidemiology; Electricity; Humans; Incidence; *Light; Lung Neoplasms/*epidemiology; Male; Prostatic Neoplasms/*epidemiology; Risk Factors; Urban Population; World Health; Oncogenesis  
  Abstract The incidence rates of cancers in men differ by countries of the world. We compared the incidence rates of three of the most common cancers (prostate, lung, and colon) in men residing in 164 different countries with the population-weighted light at night (LAN) exposure and with several developmental and environmental indicators, including per capita income, percent urban population, and electricity consumption. The estimate of per capita LAN exposure was a novel aspect of this study. Both ordinary least squares (OLS) and spatial error (SE) regression models were used in the analysis. We found a significant positive association between population exposure to LAN and incidence rates of prostate cancer, but no such association with lung cancer or colon cancer. The prostate cancer result is consistent with a biological theory and a limited number of previous studies of circadian disruption and risk. The LAN-prostate cancer connection is postulated to be due to suppression of melatonin and/or disruption of clock gene function. An analysis holding other variables at average values across the 164 countries yielded a risk of prostate cancer in the highest LAN-exposed countries 110% higher than in the lowest LAN exposed countries. This observed association is a necessary condition for a potentially large effect of LAN on risk of prostate cancer. However, it is not sufficient due to potential confounding by factors that increase the risk of prostate cancer and are also associated with LAN among the studied countries.  
  Address Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Management, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:19142761 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 163  
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Author Kloog, I.; Stevens, R.G.; Haim, A.; Portnov, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nighttime light level co-distributes with breast cancer incidence worldwide Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Cancer Causes & Control : CCC Abbreviated Journal Cancer Causes Control  
  Volume 21 Issue 12 Pages 2059-2068  
  Keywords Adult; Birth Rate; Breast Neoplasms/*epidemiology/etiology; Carcinoma/*epidemiology/etiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Cohort Studies; Electricity; Female; Humans; Incidence; *Light/adverse effects; Lighting; Photoperiod; Registries; Urban Population/statistics & numerical data; World Health; oncogenesis  
  Abstract Breast cancer incidence varies widely among countries of the world for largely unknown reasons. We investigated whether country-level light at night (LAN) is associated with incidence. We compared incidence rates of five common cancers in women (breast, lung, colorectal, larynx, and liver), observed in 164 countries of the world from the GLOBOCAN database, with population-weighted country-level LAN, and with several developmental and environmental indicators, including fertility rate, per capita income, percent of urban population, and electricity consumption. Two types of regression models were used in the analysis: Ordinary Least Squares and Spatial Errors. We found a significant positive association between population LAN level and incidence rates of breast cancer. There was no such an association between LAN level and colorectal, larynx, liver, and lung cancers. A sensitivity test, holding other variables at their average values, yielded a 30-50% higher risk of breast cancer in the highest LAN exposed countries compared to the lowest LAN exposed countries. The possibility that under-reporting from the registries in the low-resource, and also low-LAN, countries created a spurious association was evaluated in several ways and shown not to account for the results. These findings provide coherence of the previously reported case-control and cohort studies with the co-distribution of LAN and breast cancer in entire populations.  
  Address Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Management, University of Haifa, 31905 Mount Carmel, Haifa, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0957-5243 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20680434 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 160  
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Author Nordt, A.; Klenke, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sleepless in town--drivers of the temporal shift in dawn song in urban European blackbirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 8 Issue 8 Pages e71476  
  Keywords Animals; Automobiles; Cities; Ecosystem; Germany; Humans; Light; Male; Noise; Photoperiod; Sleep; Songbirds/*physiology; Urban Population; *Vocalization, Animal; dawn chorus; morning chorus  
  Abstract Organisms living in urban environments are exposed to different environmental conditions compared to their rural conspecifics. Especially anthropogenic noise and artificial night light are closely linked to urbanization and pose new challenges to urban species. Songbirds are particularly affected by these factors, because they rely on the spread of acoustic information and adjust their behaviour to the rhythm of night and day, e.g. time their dawn song according to changing light intensities. Our aim was to clarify the specific contributions of artificial night light and traffic noise on the timing of dawn song of urban European Blackbirds (Turdus merula). We investigated the onset of blackbird dawn song along a steep urban gradient ranging from an urban forest to the city centre of Leipzig, Germany. This gradient of anthropogenic noise and artificial night light was reflected in the timing of dawn song. In the city centre, blackbirds started their dawn song up to 5 hours earlier compared to those in semi-natural habitats. We found traffic noise to be the driving factor of the shift of dawn song into true night, although it was not completely separable from the effects of ambient night light. We additionally included meteorological conditions into the analysis and found an effect on the song onset. Cloudy and cold weather delayed the onset, but cloud cover was assumed to reflect night light emissions, thus, amplified sky luminance and increased the effect of artificial night light. Beside these temporal effects, we also found differences in the spatial autocorrelation of dawn song onset showing a much higher variability in noisy city areas than in rural parks and forests. These findings indicate that urban hazards such as ambient noise and light pollution show a manifold interference with naturally evolved cycles and have significant effects on the activity patterns of urban blackbirds.  
  Address Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Department of Conservation Biology, Leipzig, Germany. anja.nordt@ufz.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23940759; PMCID:PMC3737108 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 43  
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Author Roy Chowdhury, P.K.; Maithani, S.; Dadhwal, V.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Estimation of urban population in Indo-Gangetic Plains using night-time OLS data Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing  
  Volume 33 Issue 8 Pages 2498-2515  
  Keywords DMSP-OLS; satellite; remote sensing; Indo-Gangetic Plains; Urban Population; Urban environment  
  Abstract In this study the applicability of a night-time Operational Linescan System (OLS) sensor in urban population estimation has been examined. The study area consisted of the Indian portion of the Indo-Gangetic Plains. Using night-time OLS data, urban areas situated in the study area were mapped and their areal extent was determined. A linear relationship between the natural log of the urban area and the natural log of the corresponding population was established. The model was calibrated for the year 2001 and then validated for the year 1995. Subsequently, the model was modified using ancillary factors such as electricity consumption to reduce the error in population estimation. Thus, this study attempted to explore the applicability of nighttime OLS data in urban population estimation.  
  Address Indian Institute of Remote Sensing , Dehradun, 248 001, India  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 226  
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