|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author (up) Allik, T.; Ramboyong, L.; Roberts, M.; Walters, M.; Soyka, T.; Dixon, R.; Cho, J.
Title Enhanced oil spill detection sensors in low-light environments Type Conference Article
Year 2016 Publication Proc. SPIE 9827, Ocean Sensing and Monitoring VIII, 98270B (May 17, 2016) Abbreviated Journal Proc. SPIE 9827
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Instrumentation; Sensors; Cameras; Long wavelength infrared; Short wave infrared radiation; Spectroscopy; Calibration; Remote sensing; Water; Near infrared; Night vision
Abstract Although advances have been made in oil spill remote detection, many electro-optic sensors do not provide real-time images, do not work well under degraded visual environments, nor provide a measure of extreme oil thickness in marine environments. A joint program now exists between BSEE and NVESD that addresses these capability gaps in remote sensing of oil spills. Laboratory experiments, calibration techniques, and field tests were performed at Fort Belvoir, Virginia; Santa Barbara, California; and the Ohmsett Test Facility in Leonardo, New Jersey. Weathered crude oils were studied spectroscopically and characterized with LWIR, and low-light-level visible/NIR, and SWIR cameras. We designed and fabricated an oil emulsion thickness calibration cell for spectroscopic analysis and ground truth, field measurements. Digital night vision cameras provided real-time, wide-dynamic-range imagery, and were able to detect and recognize oil from full sun to partial moon light. The LWIR camera provided quantitative oil analysis (identification) for >1 mm thick crude oils both day and night. Two filtered, co-registered, SWIR cameras were used to determine whether oil thickness could be measured in real time. Spectroscopic results revealed that oil emulsions vary with location and weathered state and some oils (e.g., ANS and Santa Barbara seeps) do not show the spectral rich features from archived Deep Water Horizon hyperspectral data. Multi-sensor imagery collected during the 2015 USCG Airborne Oil Spill Remote Sensing and Reporting Exercise and the design of a compact, multiband imager are discussed.
Address Active EO Inc.
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SPIE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1475
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bennett, Victoria J; Hale, Amanda M
Title Red aviation lights on wind turbines do not increase bat-turbine collisions Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Animal Conservation Abbreviated Journal
Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 354-358
Keywords animals; flying mammals; foraging; Light wavelength
Abstract Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain why bat–wind turbine collisions occur; however, most of these hypotheses have yet to be tested and with high numbers of bat fatalities reported annually at wind resource facilities globally, there is a real need to understand this phenomenon. In this study, we tested whether aviation lighting influenced the number of bat fatalities at wind turbines. Thus, at a utility-scale wind facility in north-central Texas, we explored whether bat fatalities were higher at wind turbines with red flashing aviation lighting compared with turbines without such lighting. Over a 5-year period, we recorded fatalities at wind turbines as part of a long-term fatality monitoring programme. During standardized searches, we collected 916 bat carcasses representing all six species known to be present at the site. We found that bat fatalities were higher at wind turbines without aviation lighting compared with those with; a pattern that was driven by one species, Lasiurus borealis, and there was no significant difference between fatalities at wind turbines with or without aviation lighting for any other species. Our study demonstrates that wind turbines should continue to be fitted with synchronized, flashing red aviation lights, as this form of lighting does not appear to be one of the potential causes of bat fatalities at wind resource facilities. We therefore support further research that explores possible alternative causes of bat–wind turbine interactions. More specifically, we reiterate that there is still a pressing need to determine the aspects of bat ecology that result in individuals coming into contact with wind turbines.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1578
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Dauchy, R T; Wren, M A; Dauchy, E M; Hoffman, A E; Hanifin, J P; Warfield, B; Jablonski, M R; Brainard, G C; Hill, S M; Mao, L; Dobek, G L; Dupepe, L M; Blask, D E
Title The influence of red light exposure at night on circadian metabolism and physiology in Sprague-Dawley rats Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science Abbreviated Journal JAALAS
Volume 54 Issue 1 Pages 40-50
Keywords animals; rodents; Circadian Rhythm; Light wavelength
Abstract Early studies on rodents showed that short-term exposure to high-intensity light (> 70 lx) above 600 nm (red-appearing) influences circadian neuroendocrine and metabolic physiology. Here we addressed the hypothesis that long-term, low-intensity red light exposure at night (rLEN) from a 'safelight' emitting no light below approximately 620 nm disrupts the nocturnal circadian melatonin signal as well as circadian rhythms in circulating metabolites, related regulatory hormones, and physi- ologic parameters. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 12 per group) were maintained on control 12:12-h light:dark (300 lx; lights on, 0600) or experimental 12:12 rLEN (8.1 lx) lighting regimens. After 1 wk, rats underwent 6 low-volume blood draws via cardiocentesis (0400, 0800, 1200, 1600, 2000, and 2400) over a 4-wk period to assess arterial plasma melatonin, total fatty acid, glucose, lactic acid, pO2, pCO2, insulin, leptin and corticosterone concentrations. Results revealed plasma melatonin levels (mean +/- 1 SD) were high in the dark phase (197.5 +/- 4.6 pg/mL) and low in the light phase (2.6 +/- 1.2 pg/mL) of control condi- tions and significantly lower than controls under experimental conditions throughout the 24-h period (P < 0.001). Prominent circadian rhythms of plasma levels of total fatty acid, glucose, lactic acid, pO2, pCO2, insulin, leptin, and corticosterone were significantly (P < 0.05) disrupted under experimental conditions as compared with the corresponding entrained rhythms under control conditions. Therefore, chronic use of low-intensity rLEN from a common safelight disrupts the circadian organization of neuroendocrine, metabolic, and physiologic parameters indicative of animal health and wellbeing.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1583
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Ji, L.; Zhao, Z.; Zhu, X.; Yu, Y.; Shen, L.; Wang, L.
Title Harmful effects on organism induced by light of different wavelength and power Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Optik Abbreviated Journal Optik
Volume 125 Issue 19 Pages 5808-5812
Keywords LED; Wavelength; Power; Microvessel; Absorption spectrum
Abstract Although a variety of experiments on light exposure stress to animals significantly affect the retina and circulation system, it is still unknown the relationship between the different extent of harmful effect on organism and light with different wavelengths and power. This study is aimed to investigate the changes to microblood vessel and the variations in serum absorption spectrum. LED light of different wavelength and power were used. The results show that power has a relatively larger impact on physiological indexes than wavelength. The extents of these variations are relatively different according to the regression equations. All of these stimulations cause damage to mice physiological conditions, producing some extent of light pollution. The research findings supply the guideline for the effective prevention of the harmful effect on organism by light pollution from the view of science of optical life science.
Address College of Science, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016, People's Republic of China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 362
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Johansen, N.S.; Vänninen, I.; Pinto, D.M.; Nissinen, A.I.; Shipp, L.
Title In the light of new greenhouse technologies: 2. Direct effects of artificial lighting on arthropods and integrated pest management in greenhouse crops Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Annals of Applied Biology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 159 Issue 1 Pages 1-27
Keywords Behaviour; biology; insects; light intensity; mites; photobiology; photoperiod; photoreceptors; plant protection; visual ecology; wavelength distribution
Abstract Novel lighting technology offers the possibility of improved arthropod integrated pest management (IPM) in artificially lighted crops. This review compiles the current knowledge on how greenhouse pest and beneficial arthropods are directly affected by light, with the focus on whiteflies. The effect of ultraviolet depletion on orientation and colour-coded phototaxis are to some extent studied and utilised for control of the flying adult stage of some pest species, but far less is known about the visual ecology of commercially used biological control agents and pollinators, and about how light affects arthropod biology in different life stages. Four approaches for utilisation of artificial light in IPM of whiteflies are suggested: (a) use of attractive visual stimuli incorporated into traps for monitoring and direct control, (b) use of visual stimuli that disrupt the host-detection process, (c) radiation with harmful or inhibitory wavelengths to kill or suppress pest populations and (d) use of time cues to manipulate daily rhythms and photoperiodic responses. Knowledge gaps are identified to design a road map for research on IPM in crops lighted with high-pressure sodium lamps, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and photoselective films. LEDs are concluded to offer possibilities for behavioural manipulation of arthropods, but the extent of such possibilities depends in practice on which wavelength combinations are determined to be optimal for plant production. Furthermore, the direct effects of artificial lighting on IPM must be studied in the context of plant-mediated effects of artificial light on arthropods, as both types of manipulations are possible, particularly with LEDs.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-4746 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 112
Permanent link to this record