|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Fonken, L.K.; Workman, J.L.; Walton, J.C.; Weil, Z.M.; Morris, J.S.; Haim, A.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Light at night increases body mass by shifting the time of food intake Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
Volume 107 Issue 43 Pages 18664-18669
Keywords Animals; Body Mass Index; *Circadian Rhythm; Disease Models, Animal; Eating/*physiology/psychology/*radiation effects; Energy Intake; Feeding Behavior/physiology/psychology/radiation effects; Glucose Tolerance Test; Humans; Male; Metabolic Syndrome X/etiology; Mice; Motor Activity; Obesity/*etiology/pathology/physiopathology/psychology; *Photoperiod
Abstract The global increase in the prevalence of obesity and metabolic disorders coincides with the increase of exposure to light at night (LAN) and shift work. Circadian regulation of energy homeostasis is controlled by an endogenous biological clock that is synchronized by light information. To promote optimal adaptive functioning, the circadian clock prepares individuals for predictable events such as food availability and sleep, and disruption of clock function causes circadian and metabolic disturbances. To determine whether a causal relationship exists between nighttime light exposure and obesity, we examined the effects of LAN on body mass in male mice. Mice housed in either bright (LL) or dim (DM) LAN have significantly increased body mass and reduced glucose tolerance compared with mice in a standard (LD) light/dark cycle, despite equivalent levels of caloric intake and total daily activity output. Furthermore, the timing of food consumption by DM and LL mice differs from that in LD mice. Nocturnal rodents typically eat substantially more food at night; however, DM mice consume 55.5% of their food during the light phase, as compared with 36.5% in LD mice. Restricting food consumption to the active phase in DM mice prevents body mass gain. These results suggest that low levels of light at night disrupt the timing of food intake and other metabolic signals, leading to excess weight gain. These data are relevant to the coincidence between increasing use of light at night and obesity in humans.
Address Department of Neuroscience, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. fonken.1@osu.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:20937863; PMCID:PMC2972983 Approved (up) no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 169
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kohyama, J.
Title A newly proposed disease condition produced by light exposure during night: asynchronization Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Brain & Development Abbreviated Journal Brain Dev
Volume 31 Issue 4 Pages 255-273
Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Biological Clocks; Child; Child, Preschool; Chronotherapy; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Complementary Therapies; Humans; Infant; Japan; *Light; Motor Activity; Phototherapy; Serotonin/metabolism; Sleep; Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/*physiopathology/therapy; Students; Wakefulness
Abstract The bedtime of preschoolers/pupils/students in Japan has become progressively later with the result sleep duration has become progressively shorter. With these changes, more than half of the preschoolers/pupils/students in Japan recently have complained of daytime sleepiness, while approximately one quarter of junior and senior high school students in Japan reportedly suffer from insomnia. These preschoolers/pupils/students may be suffering from behaviorally induced insufficient sleep syndrome due to inadequate sleep hygiene. If this diagnosis is correct, they should be free from these complaints after obtaining sufficient sleep by avoiding inadequate sleep hygiene. However, such a therapeutic approach often fails. Although social factors are often involved in these sleep disturbances, a novel clinical notion--asynchronization--can further a deeper understanding of the pathophysiology of these disturbances. The essence of asynchronization is a disturbance in various aspects (e.g., cycle, amplitude, phase and interrelationship) of the biological rhythms that normally exhibit circadian oscillation, presumably involving decreased activity of the serotonergic system. The major trigger of asynchronization is hypothesized to be a combination of light exposure during the night and a lack of light exposure in the morning. In addition to basic principles of morning light and an avoidance of nocturnal light exposure, presumable potential therapeutic approaches for asynchronization involve both conventional ones (light therapy, medications (hypnotics, antidepressants, melatonin, vitamin B12), physical activation, chronotherapy) and alternative ones (kampo, pulse therapy, direct contact, control of the autonomic nervous system, respiration (qigong, tanden breathing), chewing, crawling). A morning-type behavioral preference is described in several of the traditional textbooks for good health. The author recommends a morning-type behavioral lifestyle as a way to reduce behavioral/emotional problems, and to lessen the likelihood of falling into asynchronization.
Address Department of Pediatrics, Tokyo Kita Shakai Hoken Hospital, 4-17-56 Akabanedai, Tokyo, Japan. j-kohyama@tokyokita-jadecom.jp
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0387-7604 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:18757146 Approved (up) no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 297
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Allema, A.B.; Rossing, A.H.; van der Werf, W.; Heusinkveld, B.G.; Bukovinszky, T.; Steingröver, E.; van Lenteren, C.
Title Effect of light quality on movement of Pterostichus melanarius (Coleoptera: Carabidae) Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Journal of Applied Entomology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 136 Issue 10 Pages 793–800
Keywords Animals; insects; movement activity; movement behaviour; movement speed; red light sensitivity; resting behaviour
Abstract Behaviour of nocturnal insects is routinely observed under red light, but it is unclear how the behaviour under red light compares to behaviour in complete darkness, or under a source of white light. Here, we measure movement behaviour of the nocturnal carabid beetle Pterostichus melanarius Illiger (Coleoptera: Carabidae) using camera recording under a near-infrared (nir), red or white radiation source. Red light significantly reduced movement speed in females similar to the effect of white light and different from nir. Also movement activity and pause length were affected by radiation source, with a significant difference between nir and white light, and with intermediate values in red light. The results presented here indicate that P. melanarius has different movement behaviour under the three radiation sources and suggest that nir rather than red radiation is most appropriate for measuring behaviour in total darkness. However, in the field total darkness is rare both because of natural light sources such as the moon and stars but increasingly also because of ecological light pollution, and therefore red light may still be of use for observing ecologically and practically relevant natural night-time behaviour.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved (up) no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 385
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Atkinson, G.; Davenne, D.
Title Relationships between sleep, physical activity and human health Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav
Volume 90 Issue 2-3 Pages 229-235
Keywords Human Health; Activity Cycles/*physiology; Animals; Body Temperature/physiology; Exercise/*physiology; Health; Humans; Motor Activity/physiology; Pineal Gland/physiology; Sleep/*physiology; Wakefulness/physiology
Abstract Although sleep and exercise may seem to be mediated by completely different physiological mechanisms, there is growing evidence for clinically important relationships between these two behaviors. It is known that passive body heating facilitates the nocturnal sleep of healthy elderly people with insomnia. This finding supports the hypothesis that changes in body temperature trigger somnogenic brain areas to initiate sleep. Nevertheless, little is known about how the core and distal thermoregulatory responses to exercise fit into this hypothesis. Such knowledge could also help in reducing sleep problems associated with nocturnal shiftwork. It is difficult to incorporate physical activity into a shiftworker's lifestyle, since it is already disrupted in terms of family commitments and eating habits. A multi-research strategy is needed to identify what the optimal amounts and timing of physical activity are for reducing shiftwork-related sleep problems. The relationships between sleep, exercise and diet are also important, given the recently reported associations between short sleep length and obesity. The cardiovascular safety of exercise timing should also be considered, since recent data suggest that the reactivity of blood pressure to a change in general physical activity is highest during the morning. This time is associated with an increased risk in general of a sudden cardiac event, but more research work is needed to separate the influences of light, posture and exercise per se on the haemodynamic responses to sleep and physical activity following sleep taken at night and during the day as a nap.
Address Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Henry Cotton Campus, Webster Street, Liverpool L3 2ET, UK. G.Atkinson@ljmu.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:17067643; PMCID:PMC2782301 Approved (up) no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 717
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Garaulet, M.; Ordovas, J.M.; Madrid, J.A.
Title The chronobiology, etiology and pathophysiology of obesity Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication International Journal of Obesity (2005) Abbreviated Journal Int J Obes (Lond)
Volume 34 Issue 12 Pages 1667-1683
Keywords Human Health; Animals; CLOCK Proteins/genetics/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm/genetics/*physiology; Energy Intake/*physiology; Feeding Behavior/physiology; Humans; Mice; Motor Activity/physiology; *Obesity/etiology/physiopathology; Sleep/physiology; Sleep Deprivation/complications/genetics/*physiopathology
Abstract The effect of CD on human health is an emerging issue. Many records link CD with diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular, cognitive impairment and obesity, all of them conducive to premature aging. The amount of sleep has declined by 1.5 h over the past century, accompanied by an important increase in obesity. Shift work, sleep deprivation and exposure to bright light at night increase the prevalence of adiposity. Animal models have shown that mice with Clock gene disruption are prone to developing obesity and MetS. This review summarizes the latest developments with regard to chronobiology and obesity, considering (1) how molecular clocks coordinate metabolism and the specific role of the adipocyte; (2) CD and its causes and pathological consequences; (3) the epidemiological evidence of obesity as a chronobiological illness; and (4) theories of circadian disruption and obesity. Energy intake and expenditure, relevance of sleep, fat intake from a circadian perspective and psychological and genetic aspects of obesity are examined. Finally, ideas about the use of chronobiology in the treatment of obesity are discussed. Such knowledge has the potential to become a valuable tool in the understanding of the relationship between the chronobiology, etiology and pathophysiology of obesity.
Address Faculty of Biology, Department of Physiology, Campus of Espinardo, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain. garaulet@um.es
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0307-0565 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:20567242 Approved (up) no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 755
Permanent link to this record