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Author Gaston, K.J.
Title Nighttime Ecology: The “Nocturnal Problem” Revisited Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication The American Naturalist Abbreviated Journal The American Naturalist
Volume 193 Issue 4 Pages 481-502
Keywords Ecology; activity; diel; ecosystems; macroecology; nighttime; nocturnal; time partitioning
Abstract The existence of a synthetic program of research on what was then termed the “nocturnal problem” and that we might now call “nighttime ecology” was declared more than 70 years ago. In reality, this failed to materialize, arguably as a consequence of practical challenges in studying organisms at night and instead concentrating on the existence of circadian rhythms, the mechanisms that give rise to them, and their consequences. This legacy is evident to this day, with consideration of the ecology of the nighttime markedly underrepresented in ecological research and literature. However, several factors suggest that it would be timely to revive the vision of a comprehensive research program in nighttime ecology. These include (i) that the study of the ecology of the night is being revolutionized by new and improved technologies; (ii) suggestions that, far from being a minor component of biodiversity, a high proportion of animal species are active at night; (iii) that fundamental questions about differences and connections between the ecology of the daytime and the nighttime remain largely unanswered; and (iv) that the nighttime environment is coming under severe anthropogenic pressure. In this article, I seek to reestablish nighttime ecology as a synthetic program of research, highlighting key focal topics and questions and providing an overview of the current state of understanding and developments.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9FE, United Kingdom; and Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, Institute for Advanced Study, Wallotstrasse 19, 14193 Berlin, Germany; k.j.gaston(at)exeter.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher University of Chicago Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-0147 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2254
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Author Finch, D.; Smith, B.R.; Marshall, C.; Coomber, F.G.; Kubasiewicz, L.M.; Anderson, M.; Wright, P.G.R.; Mathews, F.
Title Effects of Artificial Light at Night (ALAN) on European Hedgehog Activity at Supplementary Feeding Stations Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Animals : an Open Access Journal From MDPI Abbreviated Journal Animals (Basel)
Volume 10 Issue 5 Pages in press
Keywords Animals; Erinaceus europaeus; activity pattern; camera trap; citizen science; fragmentation; hedgehogs; light pollution; lightscape; urbanisation
Abstract : Artificial light at night (ALAN) can have negative consequences for a wide range of taxa. However, the effects on nocturnal mammals other than bats are poorly understood. A citizen science camera trapping experiment was therefore used to assess the effect of ALAN on the activity of European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) at supplementary feeding stations in UK gardens. A crossover design was implemented at 33 gardens with two treatments-artificial light and darkness-each of which lasted for one week. The order of treatment depended on the existing lighting regime at the feeding station: dark treatments were applied first at dark feeding stations, whereas light treatments were used first where the station was already illuminated. Although temporal changes in activity patterns in response to the treatments were noted in some individuals, the direction of the effects was not consistent. Similarly, there was no overall impact of ALAN on the presence or feeding activities of hedgehogs in gardens where supplementary feeding stations were present. These findings are somewhat reassuring insofar as they demonstrate no net negative effect on a species thought to be in decline, in scenarios where the animals are already habituated to supplementary feeding. However, further research is needed to examine long-term effects and the effects of lighting on hedgehog prey, reproductive success and predation risk.
Address Mammal Society, London E9 6EJ, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2076-2615 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32354129 Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2904
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Author Maroni, M.J.; Capri, K.M.; Arruda, N.L.; Gelineau, R.R.; Deane, H.V.; Concepcion, H.A.; DeCourcey, H.; Monteiro De Pina, I.K.; Cushman, A.V.; Chasse, M.H.; Logan, R.W.; Seggio, J.A.
Title Substrain specific behavioral responses in male C57BL/6N and C57BL/6J mice to a shortened 21-hour day and high-fat diet Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Mouse; circadian; high-fat diet; locomotor activity; photoperiod; strain differences
Abstract Altered circadian rhythms have negative consequences on health and behavior. Emerging evidence suggests genetics influences the physiological and behavioral responses to circadian disruption. We investigated the effects of a 21 h day (T = 21 cycle), with high-fat diet consumption, on locomotor activity, explorative behaviors, and health in male C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N mice. Mice were exposed to either a T = 24 or T = 21 cycle and given standard rodent chow (RC) or a 60% high-fat diet (HFD) followed by behavioral assays and physiological measures. We uncovered numerous strain differences within the behavioral and physiological assays, mainly that C57BL/6J mice exhibit reduced susceptibility to the obesogenic effects of (HFD) and anxiety-like behavior as well as increased circadian and novelty-induced locomotor activity compared to C57BL/6N mice. There were also substrain-specific differences in behavioral responses to the T = 21 cycle, including exploratory behaviors and circadian locomotor activity. Under the 21-h day, mice consuming RC displayed entrainment, while mice exposed to HFD exhibited a lengthening of activity rhythms. In the open-field and light-dark box, mice exposed to the T = 21 cycle had increased novelty-induced locomotor activity with no further effects of diet, suggesting daylength may affect mood-related behaviors. These results indicate that different circadian cycles impact metabolic and behavioral responses depending on genetic background, and despite circadian entrainment.
Address Department of Biological Sciences, Bridgewater State University, Bridgewater, Massachusetts, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32400203 Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2919
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Author Lopez-Ruiz, H., Nezamuddin, N., Al Hassan, R., & Muhsen, A.
Title Estimating Freight Transport Activity Using Nighttime Lights Satellite Data in China, India and Saudi Arabia Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication EconPapers Abbreviated Journal
Volume ks--2019-mp07 Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing; Freight; shipping; freight transport activity; FTA; China; India; Saudi Arabia; Transportation; nighttime lights; NTL
Abstract This paper focuses on the methodology for estimating total freight transport activity (FTA) for three countries — China, India and Saudi Arabia — with the objective of building on current state-of-the-art transportation modeling in three key areas: Studying the relationship between nighttime lights (NTL) and FTA allows for an estimation of full transportation datasets for countries where only a few observation points exist or where data is unavailable. Establishing the foundation for future work on how to use this approach in transport flow estimation (origin-destination matrices). Determining whether this approach can be used globally, given the coverage of the satellite data used. The paper uses the KAPSARC Transport Analysis Framework (KTAF), which estimates transport activity from freely available global data sources, satellite images and NTL. It is a tool for estimating freight transport activity that can be used in models to measure the impact of an accelerated transport policy planning approach. The methodology offers a solution to inadequate data access and allows for scenario building in policy planning for transportation. This approach allows for quick estimation of the effects of policy measures and economic changes on transportation activities at a global level. The paper also includes a detailed guide on how to replicate the methodology used in this analysis.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) IDA @ intern @ Serial 2639
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Author Gerrish, G.A.; Morin, J.G.; Rivers, T.J.; Patrawala, Z.
Title Darkness as an ecological resource: the role of light in partitioning the nocturnal niche Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Oecologia Abbreviated Journal Oecologia
Volume 160 Issue 3 Pages 525-536
Keywords Age Factors; Animals; Belize; Crustacea/*physiology; *Darkness; *Ecosystem; Feeding Behavior/physiology; Linear Models; Motor Activity/*physiology; Photoperiod; Sexual Behavior, Animal/physiology; Water Movements
Abstract Nocturnal behaviors that vary as a function of light intensity, either from the setting sun or the moon, are typically labeled as circadian or circalunar. Both of these terms refer to endogenous time-dependent behaviors. In contrast, the nightly reproductive and feeding behaviors of Vargula annecohenae, a bioluminescent ostracod (Arthropoda: Crustacea) fluctuate in response to light intensity, an exogenous factor that is not strictly time-dependent. We measured adult and juvenile activity of V. annecohenae throughout lunar cycles in January/February and June 2003. Overnight and nightly measurements of foraging and reproductive behavior of adult V. annecohenae indicated that activity was greatest when a critical “dark threshold” was reached and that the dark threshold for adult V. annecohenae is met when less than a third of the moon is visible or at the intensity of light 2-3 min before the start of nautical twilight when no moon is illuminated. Juvenile V. annecohenae were also nocturnally active but demonstrated little or no response to lunar illumination, remaining active even during brightly moonlit periods. In addition to light level, water velocity also influenced the behaviors of V. annecohenae, with fewer juveniles and adults actively foraging on nights when water velocity was high (>25 cm/s). Our data demonstrate that the strongest environmental factor influencing adult feeding and reproductive behaviors of V. annecohenae is the availability of time when illumination is below the critical dark threshold. This dependence on darkness for successful growth and reproduction allows us to classify darkness as a resource, in the same way that the term has been applied to time, space and temperature.
Address Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850, USA. ggerrish@nd.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0029-8549 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19330516 Approved no
Call Number (up) IDA @ john @ Serial 16
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