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Author Garaulet, M.; Ordovas, J.M.; Madrid, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The chronobiology, etiology and pathophysiology of obesity Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication International Journal of Obesity (2005) Abbreviated Journal Int J Obes (Lond)  
  Volume 34 Issue 12 Pages 1667-1683  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; CLOCK Proteins/genetics/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm/genetics/*physiology; Energy Intake/*physiology; Feeding Behavior/physiology; Humans; Mice; Motor Activity/physiology; *Obesity/etiology/physiopathology; Sleep/physiology; Sleep Deprivation/complications/genetics/*physiopathology  
  Abstract The effect of CD on human health is an emerging issue. Many records link CD with diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular, cognitive impairment and obesity, all of them conducive to premature aging. The amount of sleep has declined by 1.5 h over the past century, accompanied by an important increase in obesity. Shift work, sleep deprivation and exposure to bright light at night increase the prevalence of adiposity. Animal models have shown that mice with Clock gene disruption are prone to developing obesity and MetS. This review summarizes the latest developments with regard to chronobiology and obesity, considering (1) how molecular clocks coordinate metabolism and the specific role of the adipocyte; (2) CD and its causes and pathological consequences; (3) the epidemiological evidence of obesity as a chronobiological illness; and (4) theories of circadian disruption and obesity. Energy intake and expenditure, relevance of sleep, fat intake from a circadian perspective and psychological and genetic aspects of obesity are examined. Finally, ideas about the use of chronobiology in the treatment of obesity are discussed. Such knowledge has the potential to become a valuable tool in the understanding of the relationship between the chronobiology, etiology and pathophysiology of obesity.  
  Address Faculty of Biology, Department of Physiology, Campus of Espinardo, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain. garaulet@um.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0307-0565 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20567242 Approved no  
  Call Number (up) LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 755  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sherman, H.; Gutman, R.; Chapnik, N.; Meylan, J.; le Coutre, J.; Froy, O. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Caffeine alters circadian rhythms and expression of disease and metabolic markers Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology Abbreviated Journal Int J Biochem Cell Biol  
  Volume 43 Issue 5 Pages 829-838  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Biological Markers/blood/metabolism; Body Weight/drug effects/physiology; Caffeine/*pharmacology; Caloric Restriction; Circadian Rhythm/*drug effects/genetics/physiology; *Disease/genetics; Eating/drug effects/physiology; Gene Expression Regulation/*drug effects/genetics; HEK293 Cells; Humans; Inflammation/metabolism; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Motor Activity/drug effects/physiology  
  Abstract The circadian clock regulates many aspects of physiology, energy metabolism, and sleep. Restricted feeding (RF), a regimen that restricts the duration of food availability entrains the circadian clock. Caffeine has been shown to affect both metabolism and sleep. However, its effect on clock gene and clock-controlled gene expression has not been studied. Here, we tested the effect of caffeine on circadian rhythms and the expression of disease and metabolic markers in the serum, liver, and jejunum of mice supplemented with caffeine under ad libitum (AL) feeding or RF for 16 weeks. Caffeine significantly affected circadian oscillation and the daily levels of disease and metabolic markers. Under AL, caffeine reduced the average daily mRNA levels of certain disease and inflammatory markers, such as liver alpha fetoprotein (Afp), C-reactive protein (Crp), jejunum alanine aminotransferase (Alt), growth arrest and DNA damage 45beta (Gadd45beta), Interleukin 1alpha (Il-1alpha), Il-1beta mRNA and serum plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1). Under RF, caffeine reduced the average daily levels of Alt, Gadd45beta, Il-1alpha and Il-1beta mRNA in the jejunum, but not in the liver. In addition, caffeine supplementation led to decreased expression of catabolic factors under RF. In conclusion, caffeine affects circadian gene expression and metabolism possibly leading to beneficial effects mainly under AL feeding.  
  Address Institute of Biochemistry, Food Science and Nutrition, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 76100, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1357-2725 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21352949 Approved no  
  Call Number (up) LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 810  
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Author Jung, K.; Kalko, E.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Where forest meets urbanization: foraging plasticity of aerial insectivorous bats in an anthropogenically altered environment Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of Mammalogy Abbreviated Journal J. Mammal.  
  Volume 91 Issue 1 Pages 144-153  
  Keywords animals; flying mammals; acoustic monitoring; anthropogenic influence; artificial light; bat activity; Chiroptera; habitat plasticity; moon  
  Abstract Given worldwide rapid human population growth resulting in degradation or loss of habitats, it is important to understand how anthropogenic factors affect species presence and activity, and consequently, how well species tolerate or adapt to anthropogenically altered environments. This study, conducted in Panama, focuses on aerial insectivorous bats, a highly mobile and ecologically important, but largely understudied group. Acoustic monitoring was used to investigate habitat use in a tropical forest-town interface and microhabitat use around streetlights differing in wavelength (type of light) and accessibility (distance to vegetation). Plasticity in microhabitat use also was examined in relation to season and moonlight. We recorded a total of 25 aerial insectivorous bat species in the study area and found a subset of 20 species in town of which 18 frequently foraged around streetlights. Bat activity (passes/min) was lowest at the forest site, highest at streetlights, and intermediate in the dark areas of town. General bat activity at streetlights was concentrated at bluish-white lights compared to yellow-white and orange lights. However, bats revealed species-specific microhabitats with regard to light type, distance to vegetation, and relative light intensity. Season and moon phase affected microhabitat use around streetlights leading to microhabitat plasticity of individual species. Thus, in the forest-town interface most, but not all, aerial insectivorous bats were present in town and regularly foraged around streetlights, suggesting a species-specific tolerance for habitat alteration. Bats foraging at streetlights used microhabitats, and some species even changed microhabitats, according to season or moon phase. This indicates species-specific requirements for microhabitats and the importance of preserving habitat heterogeneity.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1593  
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