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Author Kohyama, J.
Title A newly proposed disease condition produced by light exposure during night: asynchronization Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Brain & Development Abbreviated Journal Brain Dev
Volume 31 Issue 4 Pages 255-273
Keywords (down) Adolescent; Adult; Biological Clocks; Child; Child, Preschool; Chronotherapy; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Complementary Therapies; Humans; Infant; Japan; *Light; Motor Activity; Phototherapy; Serotonin/metabolism; Sleep; Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/*physiopathology/therapy; Students; Wakefulness
Abstract The bedtime of preschoolers/pupils/students in Japan has become progressively later with the result sleep duration has become progressively shorter. With these changes, more than half of the preschoolers/pupils/students in Japan recently have complained of daytime sleepiness, while approximately one quarter of junior and senior high school students in Japan reportedly suffer from insomnia. These preschoolers/pupils/students may be suffering from behaviorally induced insufficient sleep syndrome due to inadequate sleep hygiene. If this diagnosis is correct, they should be free from these complaints after obtaining sufficient sleep by avoiding inadequate sleep hygiene. However, such a therapeutic approach often fails. Although social factors are often involved in these sleep disturbances, a novel clinical notion--asynchronization--can further a deeper understanding of the pathophysiology of these disturbances. The essence of asynchronization is a disturbance in various aspects (e.g., cycle, amplitude, phase and interrelationship) of the biological rhythms that normally exhibit circadian oscillation, presumably involving decreased activity of the serotonergic system. The major trigger of asynchronization is hypothesized to be a combination of light exposure during the night and a lack of light exposure in the morning. In addition to basic principles of morning light and an avoidance of nocturnal light exposure, presumable potential therapeutic approaches for asynchronization involve both conventional ones (light therapy, medications (hypnotics, antidepressants, melatonin, vitamin B12), physical activation, chronotherapy) and alternative ones (kampo, pulse therapy, direct contact, control of the autonomic nervous system, respiration (qigong, tanden breathing), chewing, crawling). A morning-type behavioral preference is described in several of the traditional textbooks for good health. The author recommends a morning-type behavioral lifestyle as a way to reduce behavioral/emotional problems, and to lessen the likelihood of falling into asynchronization.
Address Department of Pediatrics, Tokyo Kita Shakai Hoken Hospital, 4-17-56 Akabanedai, Tokyo, Japan. j-kohyama@tokyokita-jadecom.jp
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0387-7604 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:18757146 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 297
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Author Yadav, G.; Malik, S.; Rani, S.; Kumar, V.
Title Role of light wavelengths in synchronization of circadian physiology in songbirds Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords (down) Activity; Animals; Bunting; Cortisol; Light wavelength; Melatonin; Weaver bird
Abstract This study investigated whether at identical duration and equal energy level birds presented with short (450nm; blue, B) and long (640nm; red, R) light wavelengths would differentially interpret them and exhibit wavelength-dependent circadian behavioral and physiological responses, despite the difference in their breeding latitudes. Temperate migratory blackheaded buntings (Emberiza melanocephala) and subtropical non-migratory Indian weaverbirds (Ploceus philippinus) initially entrained to 12h light:12h darkness (12L:12D; L=0.33muM/m2/s, D=0muM/m2/s) in two groups of each, groups 1 and 2, were subjected to constant light (LL, 0.33muM/m2/s), which rendered them arrhythmic in the activity behavior. They were then exposed for about two weeks each to 12B:12R and 12R:12B (group 1) or 12R:12B and 12B:12R (group 2) at 0.33muM/m2/s light energy level. Blue and red light periods were interpreted as the day and night, respectively, with activity and no-activity in non-migratory weaverbirds or activity and intense activity (Zugunruhe, migratory night restlessness) in the migratory buntings. Consistent with this, plasma melatonin levels under B:R, not R:B, light cycle were low and high in blue and red light periods, respectively. A similar diurnal pattern was absent in the cortisol levels, however. These results show an important role of light wavelengths in synchronization of the circadian clock governed behavior and physiology to the photoperiodic environment, and suggest that photoperiodic timing might be a conserved physiological adaptation in many more birds, regardless of the difference in breeding latitudes, than has been generally envisaged.
Address DST-IRHPA Centre for Excellence in Biological Rhythms Research, Department of Zoology, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007, India. Electronic address: drvkumar11@yahoo.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:25536387 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1080
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Author Evans, J.A.; Elliott, J.A.; Gorman, M.R.
Title Dim nighttime illumination accelerates adjustment to timezone travel in an animal model Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol
Volume 19 Issue 4 Pages R156-7
Keywords (down) *Adaptation, Physiological; Animals; Behavior, Animal/physiology; Biological Clocks/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Cricetinae; Humans; *Lighting; Mesocricetus; Mice; Motor Activity/physiology; Phodopus; *Photoperiod; Time Factors
Abstract Jetlag reflects a mismatch between local and circadian time following rapid timezone travel [1]. Appropriately timed bright light can shift human circadian rhythms but recovery is slow (e.g., 1-2 days per timezone). Most symptoms subside after resynchronization, but chronic jetlag may have enduring negative effects [2], including even accelerated mortality in mice [3]. Melatonin, prescription drugs, and/or exercise may help shift the clock but, like bright light, require complex schedules of application [1]. Thus, there is a need for more efficient and practical treatments for addressing jetlag. In contrast to bright daytime lighting, nighttime conditions have received scant attention. By incorporating more naturalistic nighttime lighting comparable in intensity to dim moonlight, we demonstrate that recovery after simulated jetlag is accelerated when nights are dimly lit rather than completely dark.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19243688 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 152
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