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Author Rotics, S.; Dayan, T.; Kronfeld-Schor, N.
Title Effect of artificial night lighting on temporally partitioned spiny mice Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Journal of Mammalogy Abbreviated Journal Journal of Mammalogy
Volume 92 Issue 1 Pages 159-168
Keywords mice; animals; mammals; Acomys cahirinus; Acomys russatus; activity patterns; light night niche; light pollution
Abstract We studied the effect of ecological light pollution on a rocky desert community, focusing on 2 spiny mouse congeners, nocturnal Acomys cahirinus (common spiny mouse) and diurnal Acomys russatus (golden spiny mouse). We hypothesized that in response to artificial illumination A. cahirinus will decrease its activity and A. russatus will increase its activity, and thus temporal overlap and interspecific competition could increase. Our study took place in 4 field enclosures: the 1st and 3rd months were controls with natural light, and in the 2nd month artificial illumination, simulating low levels of light pollution, was set for the first 3 h of the night. We implanted temperature-sensitive radiotransmitters to monitor mouse activity, and individual identification tags with automonitored foraging patches were used to track foraging behavior. A. cahirinus decreased activity and foraging with artificial lighting, restricting movement particularly in less-sheltered microhabitats, probably because of increased predation risk. Because illumination restricted both activity time and space, intraspecific encounters of A. cahirinus over foraging patches increased during and following the illuminated hours. However, diurnal A. russatus did not expand its activity into the illuminated hours, possibly due to the presence of competing A. cahirinus, or to nonfavorable environmental conditions. Therefore, overt interspecific competition was not affected by experimental light pollution. Light pollution had a negative influence by reducing overall activity and producing a relatively underexploited temporal niche, which may promote invasion of alien species that are less light sensitive; and by increasing intraspecific overlap in foraging A. cahirinus.
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ISSN 0022-2372 ISBN Medium
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Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 86
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Author Saldaña-Vázquez, R.A.; Munguía-Rosas, M.A.
Title Lunar phobia in bats and its ecological correlates: A meta-analysis Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Mammalian Biology – Zeitschrift für Säugetierkunde Abbreviated Journal Mammalian Biology – Zeitschrift für Säugetierkunde
Volume 78 Issue 3 Pages 216-219
Keywords Chiroptera; Foraging activity; Foraging habitat; Latitude; Moonlight; mammals; bats; animals
Abstract Animals show several behavioral strategies to reduce predation risks. Presumably, moonlight avoidance is a strategy used by some nocturnal species to reduce the risk of predation. In bats, some research indicates that foraging activity is negatively correlated with moonlight intensity, a phenomenon better known as lunar phobia. However, the currently available evidence is contradictory because some bat species reduce their activity during nights with more moonlight while the opposite occurs in other species. We quantitatively evaluated the strength and direction of the relationship between moonlight intensity and bat activity using a meta-analysis. We also looked at some ecological correlates of lunar phobia in bats. Specifically, we examined foraging habitat and latitude as potential moderators of the size of the lunar phobia effect. Our results show that, regardless of the method used to evaluate bat activity, the overall relationship between moonlight intensity and bat activity is significant and negative (r = −0.22). Species foraging on the surface of the water (piscivores and insectivores; r = −0.83) and forest canopy species (i.e., big frugivores; r = −0.30) are more affected by moonlight than those with different foraging habitats (understory, subcanopy, open air). Latitude was positively correlated with lunar phobia (r = 0.023). The stronger lunar phobia for bats foraging on the water surface and in the forest canopy may suggest that the risk of predation is greater where moonlight penetrates more easily. The significant effect of latitude as a moderator of lunar phobia suggests that there is a weak geographic pattern, with this phobia slightly more common in tropical bats than in temperate species.
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ISSN 1616-5047 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 97
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Author Doll, C.N.H.; Muller, J.-P.; Morley, J.G.
Title Mapping regional economic activity from night-time light satellite imagery Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Ecological Economics Abbreviated Journal Ecological Economics
Volume 57 Issue 1 Pages 75-92
Keywords Night-time light satellite imagery; Economic activity; Geographic information; Mapping; Scale
Abstract The recognition that the elements of the ‘anthropocene’ play a critical role in global change processes means that datasets describing elements of the socio-economic environment are becoming increasingly more desirable. The ability to present these data in a gridded format as opposed to the traditionally reported administrative units is advantageous for incorporation with other environmental datasets. Night-time light remote sensing data has been shown to correlate with national-level figures of Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Night-time radiance data is analysed here along with regional economic productivity data for 11 European Union countries along with the United States at a number of sub-national levels. Night-time light imagery was found to correlate with Gross Regional Product (GRP) across a range of spatial scales. Maps of economic activity at 5 km resolution were produced based on the derived relationships. To produce these maps, certain areas had to be excluded due to their anomalously high levels of economic activity for the amount of total radiance present. These areas were treated separately from other areas in the map. These results provide the first detailed examination of night-time light characteristics with respect to local economic activity and highlight issues, which should be considered when undertaking such analysis.
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ISSN 0921-8009 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 124
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Author Allema, A.B.; Rossing, A.H.; van der Werf, W.; Heusinkveld, B.G.; Bukovinszky, T.; Steingröver, E.; van Lenteren, C.
Title Effect of light quality on movement of Pterostichus melanarius (Coleoptera: Carabidae) Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Journal of Applied Entomology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 136 Issue 10 Pages 793–800
Keywords Animals; insects; movement activity; movement behaviour; movement speed; red light sensitivity; resting behaviour
Abstract Behaviour of nocturnal insects is routinely observed under red light, but it is unclear how the behaviour under red light compares to behaviour in complete darkness, or under a source of white light. Here, we measure movement behaviour of the nocturnal carabid beetle Pterostichus melanarius Illiger (Coleoptera: Carabidae) using camera recording under a near-infrared (nir), red or white radiation source. Red light significantly reduced movement speed in females similar to the effect of white light and different from nir. Also movement activity and pause length were affected by radiation source, with a significant difference between nir and white light, and with intermediate values in red light. The results presented here indicate that P. melanarius has different movement behaviour under the three radiation sources and suggest that nir rather than red radiation is most appropriate for measuring behaviour in total darkness. However, in the field total darkness is rare both because of natural light sources such as the moon and stars but increasingly also because of ecological light pollution, and therefore red light may still be of use for observing ecologically and practically relevant natural night-time behaviour.
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 385
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Author Jung, K.; Kalko, E.K.
Title Where forest meets urbanization: foraging plasticity of aerial insectivorous bats in an anthropogenically altered environment Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Journal of Mammalogy Abbreviated Journal J. Mammal.
Volume 91 Issue 1 Pages 144-153
Keywords animals; flying mammals; acoustic monitoring; anthropogenic influence; artificial light; bat activity; Chiroptera; habitat plasticity; moon
Abstract Given worldwide rapid human population growth resulting in degradation or loss of habitats, it is important to understand how anthropogenic factors affect species presence and activity, and consequently, how well species tolerate or adapt to anthropogenically altered environments. This study, conducted in Panama, focuses on aerial insectivorous bats, a highly mobile and ecologically important, but largely understudied group. Acoustic monitoring was used to investigate habitat use in a tropical forest-town interface and microhabitat use around streetlights differing in wavelength (type of light) and accessibility (distance to vegetation). Plasticity in microhabitat use also was examined in relation to season and moonlight. We recorded a total of 25 aerial insectivorous bat species in the study area and found a subset of 20 species in town of which 18 frequently foraged around streetlights. Bat activity (passes/min) was lowest at the forest site, highest at streetlights, and intermediate in the dark areas of town. General bat activity at streetlights was concentrated at bluish-white lights compared to yellow-white and orange lights. However, bats revealed species-specific microhabitats with regard to light type, distance to vegetation, and relative light intensity. Season and moon phase affected microhabitat use around streetlights leading to microhabitat plasticity of individual species. Thus, in the forest-town interface most, but not all, aerial insectivorous bats were present in town and regularly foraged around streetlights, suggesting a species-specific tolerance for habitat alteration. Bats foraging at streetlights used microhabitats, and some species even changed microhabitats, according to season or moon phase. This indicates species-specific requirements for microhabitats and the importance of preserving habitat heterogeneity.
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Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1593
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