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Author Adams, C.A.; Blumenthal, A.; Fernández-Juricic, E.; Bayne, E.; St. Clair, C.C.
Title Effect of anthropogenic light on bird movement, habitat selection, and distribution: a systematic map protocol Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Evidence Abbreviated Journal Environ Evid
Volume 8 Issue S1 Pages 13
Keywords Animals; BirdsDepartment of Biological Science, University of Alberta, CW 405, Biological Sciences Building, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E9, Canada
Abstract Anthropogenic light is known or suspected to exert profound effects on many taxa, including birds. Documentation of bird aggregation around artificial light at night, as well as observations of bird reactions to strobe lights and lasers, suggests that light may both attract and repel birds, although this assumption has yet to be tested. These effects may cause immediate changes to bird movement, habitat selection and settlement, and ultimately alter bird distribution at large spatial scales. Global increases in the extent of anthropogenic light contribute to interest by wildlife managers and the public in managing light to reduce harm to birds, but there are no evidence syntheses of the multiple ways light affects birds to guide this effort. Existing reviews usually emphasize either bird aggregation or deterrence and do so for a specific context, such as aggregation at communication towers and deterrence from airports. We outline a protocol for a systematic map that collects and organizes evidence from the many contexts in which anthropogenic light is reported to affect bird movement, habitat selection, or distribution. Our map will provide an objective synthesis of the evidence that identifies subtopics that may support systematic review and knowledge gaps that could direct future research questions. These products will substantially advance an understanding of both patterns and processes associated with the responses of birds to anthropogenic light.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2047-2382 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2547
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Author Agarwal, N.; Srivastava, S.; Malik, S.; Rani, S.; Kumar, V.
Title Altered light conditions during spring: Effects on timing of migration and reproduction in migratory redheaded bunting (Emberiza bruniceps) Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Biological Rhythm Research Abbreviated Journal Biological Rhythm Research
Volume 46 Issue 5 Pages 647-657
Keywords Animals
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0929-1016 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1166
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Author Agbaria, S.; Haim, A.; Fares, F.; Zubidat, A.E.
Title Epigenetic modification in 4T1 mouse breast cancer model by artificial light at night and melatonin – the role of DNA-methyltransferase Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 36 Issue 5 Pages 629-643
Keywords Animals
Abstract Currently, one of the most disputed hypotheses regarding breast cancer (BC) development is exposure to short wavelength artificial light at night (ALAN) as multiple studies suggest a possible link between them. This link is suggested to be mediated by nocturnal melatonin suppression that plays an integral role in circadian regulations including cell division. The objective of the research was to evaluate effects of 1 x 30 min/midnight ALAN (134 micro Wcm(-2), 460 nm) with or without nocturnal melatonin supplement on tumor development and epigenetic responses in 4T1 tumor-bearing BALB/c mice. Mice were monitored for body mass (Wb) and tumor volume for 3 weeks and thereafter urine samples were collected at regular intervals for determining daily rhythms of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (6-SMT). Finally, mice were sacrificed and the tumor, lungs, liver, and spleen were excised for analyzing the total activity of DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) and global DNA methylation (GDM) levels. Mice exposed to ALAN significantly reduced 6-SMT levels and increased Wb, tumor volume, and lung metastasis compared with controls. These effects were diminished by melatonin. The DNMT activity and GDM levels showed tissue-specific response. The enzymatic activity and GDM levels were lower in tumor and liver and higher in spleen and lungs under ALAN compared with controls. Our results suggest that ALAN disrupts the melatonin rhythm and potentially leading to increased BC burden by affecting DNMT activity and GDM levels. These data may also be applicable to early detection and management of BC by monitoring melatonin and GDM levels as early biomarker of ALAN circadian disruption.
Address b The Israeli Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Chronobiology , University of Haifa, Haifa , Israel; Zubidat3(at)013.net.il
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30746962 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2211
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Author Alaasam, V.J.; Duncan, R.; Casagrande, S.; Davies, S.; Sidher, A.; Seymoure, B.; Shen, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Ouyang, J.Q.
Title Light at night disrupts nocturnal rest and elevates glucocorticoids at cool color temperatures Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol
Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 465-472
Keywords Animals
Abstract Nighttime light pollution is quickly becoming a pervasive, global concern. Since the invention and proliferation of light-emitting diodes (LED), it has become common for consumers to select from a range of color temperatures of light with varying spectra. Yet, the biological impacts of these different spectra on organisms remain unclear. We tested if nighttime illumination of LEDs, at two commercially available color temperatures (3000 and 5000 K) and at ecologically relevant illumination levels affected body condition, food intake, locomotor activity, and glucocorticoid levels in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). We found that individuals exposed to 5000 K light had higher rates of nighttime activity (peaking after 1 week of treatment) compared to 3000 K light and controls (no nighttime light). Birds in the 5000 K treatment group also had increased corticosterone levels from pretreatment levels compared to 3000 K and control groups but no changes in body condition or food intake. Individuals that were active during the night did not consequently decrease daytime activity. This study adds to the growing evidence that the spectrum of artificial light at night is important, and we advocate the use of nighttime lighting with warmer color temperatures of 3000 K instead of 5000 K to decrease energetic costs for avian taxa.
Address Department of Biology, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29766666 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1909
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Author Alabia, I.; Dehara, M.; Saitoh, S.-I.; Hirawake, T.
Title Seasonal Habitat Patterns of Japanese Common Squid (Todarodes Pacificus) Inferred from Satellite-Based Species Distribution Models Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 8 Issue 11 Pages 921
Keywords Remote Sensing; Animals
Abstract The understanding of the spatio-temporal distributions of the species habitat in the marine environment is central to effectual resource management and conservation. Here, we examined the potential habitat distributions of Japanese common squid (Todarodes pacificus) in the Sea of Japan during a four-year period. The seasonal patterns of preferential habitat were inferred from species distribution models, built using squid occurrences detected from night-time visible images and remotely-sensed environmental factors. The predicted squid habitat (i.e., areas with high habitat suitability) revealed strong seasonal variability, characterized by a reduction of potential habitat, confined off of the southern part of the basin during the winter–spring period (December–May). Apparent expansion of preferential habitat occurred during summer–autumn months (June–November), concurrent with the formation of highly suitable habitat patches in certain regions of the Sea of Japan. These habitat distribution patterns were in response to changes in oceanographic conditions and synchronous with seasonal migration of squid. Moreover, the most important variables regulating the spatio-temporal patterns of suitable habitat were sea surface temperature, depth, sea surface height anomaly, and eddy kinetic energy. These variables could affect the habitat distributions through their impacts on growth and survival of squid, local nutrient transport, and the availability of favorable spawning and feeding grounds.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1551
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