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Author Mathews, F.; Roche, N.; Aughney, T.; Jones, N.; Day, J.; Baker, J.; Langton, S.
Title Barriers and benefits: implications of artificial night-lighting for the distribution of common bats in Britain and Ireland Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci
Volume 370 Issue Pages 20140124
Keywords Animals; Chiroptera; Nyctalus leisleri; Pipistrellus pipistrellus; pipistrelle bat; Leisler's bat; bats, mammals; artificial light at night; migration; fragmentation; vision; outdoor lighting
Abstract Artificial lighting is a particular problem for animals active at night. Approximately 69% of mammal species are nocturnal, and one-third of these are bats. Due to their extensive movements—both on a nightly basis to exploit ephemeral food supplies, and during migration between roosts—bats have an unusually high probability of encountering artificial light in the landscape. This paper reviews the impacts of lighting on bats and their prey, exploring the direct and indirect consequences of lighting intensity and spectral composition. In addition, new data from large-scale surveys involving more than 265 000 bat calls at more than 600 locations in two countries are presented, showing that prevalent street-lighting types are not generally linked with increased activity of common and widespread bat species. Such bats, which are important to ecosystem function, are generally considered ‘light-attracted’ and likely to benefit from the insect congregations that form at lights. Leisler's bat (Nyctalus leisleri) may be an exception, being more frequent in lit than dark transects. For common pipistrelle bats (Pipistrellus pipistrellus), lighting is negatively associated with their distribution on a landscape scale, but there may be local increases in habitats with good tree cover. Research is now needed on the impacts of sky glow and glare for bat navigation, and to explore the implications of lighting for habitat matrix permeability.
Address (down) Hatherly Laboratories, University of Exeter, Prince of Wales Road, Exeter EX4 4PS, UK; f.mathews@exeter.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title The biological impacts of artificial light at night: from molecules to communities Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1123
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Author Liu, Z.; Lv, Y.; Ding, R.; Chen, X.; Pu, G.
Title Light Pollution Changes the Toxicological Effects of Cadmium on Microbial Community Structure and Function Associated with Leaf Litter Decomposition Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Molecular Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int J Mol Sci
Volume 21 Issue 2 Pages
Keywords Plants; Illumina Sequencing; artificial light at night; cadmium pollution; extracellular enzyme activities; litter decomposition; microbial biodiversity
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN/A) can not only alter the behavior and communication of biological organisms, it can also interact with other stressors. Despite its widespread use and the numerous potential ecological effects, little is known about the impact of ALAN on plant litter decomposition under cadmium (Cd) pollution in aquatic ecosystems. In an indoor microcosm experiment, we tested single and combined effects of ALAN and Cd on the activities and community structure of fungi associated with plant litter. The results showed that ALAN and/or Cd can change both water and leaf litter characteristics. ALAN exposure not only altered fungal community structure and their correlations, but also increased the activities of alkaline phosphatase, beta-glucosidase, and cellobiohydrolase. The leaf litter decomposition rate was 71% higher in the A-Cd treatment than that in the N-Cd treatment, indicating that the presence of ALAN weakened the negative impact of Cd on leaf litter decomposition. These results suggested that ALAN exposure mitigated the negative effect of Cd on leaf litter decomposition, contributing to the duel effect of ALAN on leaf litter decomposition. Overall, the results expand our understanding of ALAN on the environment and highlight the contribution of ALAN to Cd toxicity in aquatic ecosystems.
Address (down) Guangxi Key Laboratory of Plant Conservation and Restoration Ecology in Karst Terrain, Guangxi Institute of Botany, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region and Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guilin 541006, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1422-0067 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31936535 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2818
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Author Kuechly, H.U.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Ruhtz, T.; Lindemann, C.; Wolter, C.; Fischer, J.; Hölker, F.
Title Aerial survey and spatial analysis of sources of light pollution in Berlin, Germany Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 126 Issue Pages 39-50
Keywords Light pollution; Artificial lighting; Urban analysis; Remote sensing; GIS; Darkness; Spatial analysis; Light at night
Abstract Aerial observations of light pollution can fill an important gap between ground based surveys and nighttime satellite data. Terrestrially bound surveys are labor intensive and are generally limited to a small spatial extent, and while existing satellite data cover the whole world, they are limited to coarse resolution. This paper describes the production of a high resolution (1 m) mosaic image of the city of Berlin, Germany at night. The dataset is spatially analyzed to identify the major sources of light pollution in the city based on urban land use data. An area-independent ‘brightness factor’ is introduced that allows direct comparison of the light emission from differently sized land use classes, and the percentage area with values above average brightness is calculated for each class. Using this methodology, lighting associated with streets has been found to be the dominant source of zenith directed light pollution (31.6%), although other land use classes have much higher average brightness. These results are compared with other urban light pollution quantification studies. The minimum resolution required for an analysis of this type is found to be near 10 m. Future applications of high resolution datasets such as this one could include: studies of the efficacy of light pollution mitigation measures, improved light pollution simulations, economic and energy use, the relationship between artificial light and ecological parameters (e.g. circadian rhythm, fitness, mate selection, species distributions, migration barriers and seasonal behavior), or the management of nightscapes. To encourage further scientific inquiry, the mosaic data is freely available at Pangaea: http://dx.doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.785492.
Address (down) Freie Universität Berlin, Department of Earth Sciences, Institute for Space Sciences, Carl-Heinrich-Becker-Weg 6‐10, 12165 Berlin, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 188
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Author Costin, K.J.; Boulton, A.M.
Title A Field Experiment on the Effect of Introduced Light Pollution on Fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae) in the Piedmont Region of Maryland Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication The Coleopterists Bulletin Abbreviated Journal The Coleopterists Bulletin
Volume 70 Issue 1 Pages 84-86
Keywords Animals; insects; fireflies; Coleoptera; Lampyridae; Coleoptera Lampyridae; artificial light at night; ecology; light pollution
Abstract (none)
Address (down) Environmental Biology Hood College 401 Rosemont Avenue Frederick, MD 21701, U.S.A.; kjc(at)hood.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher BioOne Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0010-065X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1406
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Author Inger, R.; Bennie, J.; Davies, T.W.; Gaston, K.J.
Title Potential biological and ecological effects of flickering artificial light Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 9 Issue 5 Pages e98631
Keywords flickering; artificial light; biology
Abstract Organisms have evolved under stable natural lighting regimes, employing cues from these to govern key ecological processes. However, the extent and density of artificial lighting within the environment has increased recently, causing widespread alteration of these regimes. Indeed, night-time electric lighting is known significantly to disrupt phenology, behaviour, and reproductive success, and thence community composition and ecosystem functioning. Until now, most attention has focussed on effects of the occurrence, timing, and spectral composition of artificial lighting. Little considered is that many types of lamp do not produce a constant stream of light but a series of pulses. This flickering light has been shown to have detrimental effects in humans and other species. Whether a species is likely to be affected will largely be determined by its visual temporal resolution, measured as the critical fusion frequency. That is the frequency at which a series of light pulses are perceived as a constant stream. Here we use the largest collation to date of critical fusion frequencies, across a broad range of taxa, to demonstrate that a significant proportion of species can detect such flicker in widely used lamps. Flickering artificial light thus has marked potential to produce ecological effects that have not previously been considered.
Address (down) Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall, United Kingdom
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24874801; PMCID:PMC4038456 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 237
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