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Author Moaraf, S.; Vistoropsky, Y.; Pozner, T.; Heiblum, R.; Okuliarova, M.; Zeman, M.; Barnea, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night affects brain plasticity and melatonin in birds Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Neuroscience Letters Abbreviated Journal Neurosci Lett  
  Volume in press Issue Pages 134639  
  Keywords Animals; Artificial Light At Night (ALAN); cell proliferation; circadian cycle; melatonin; neuronal densities; zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata)  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN), which disrupts the daily cycle of light, has vast biological impacts on all organisms, and is also associated with several health problems. The few existing studies on neuronal plasticity and cognitive functions in mammals indicate that a disruption of the circadian cycle impairs learning and memory and suppresses neurogenesis. However, nothing is known about the effect of ALAN on neuronal plasticity in birds. To this end, zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) were exposed to ecologically relevant ALAN intensities (0.5, 1.5 and 5 lux), treated with BrdU to quantify cell proliferation in their ventricular zone (VZ), and compared to controls that were kept under dark nights. We found, in our diurnal birds, that ALAN significantly increased cell proliferation in the VZ. However, neuronal densities in two brain regions decreased under ALAN, suggesting neuronal death. In addition, ALAN suppressed nocturnal melatonin production in a dose-dependent manner, and might also increase body mass. Taken together, our findings add to the notion of the deleterious effect of ALAN.  
  Address Department of Natural and Life Sciences, The Open University of Israel, Ra'anana, 43107, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3940 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31760086 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2760  
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Author Newman, R.C.; Ellis, T.; Davison, P.I.; Ives, M.J.; Thomas, R.J.; Griffiths, S.W.; Riley, W.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Using novel methodologies to examine the impact of artificial light at night on the cortisol stress response in dispersing Atlantic salmon (Salmo salarL.) fry Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Conservation Physiology Abbreviated Journal Conserv Physiol  
  Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages cov051  
  Keywords Animals; salmon; Salmo salar; Artificial light at night; Atlantic salmon; cortisol  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is gaining recognition as having an important anthropogenic impact on the environment, yet the behavioural and physiological impacts of this stressor are largely unknown. This dearth of information is particularly true for freshwater ecosystems, which are already heavily impacted by anthropogenic pressures. Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) is a species of conservation and economic importance whose ecology and behaviour is well studied, making it an ideal model species. Recent investigations have demonstrated that salmon show disrupted behaviour in response to artificial light; however, it is not yet clear which physiological processes are behind the observed behavioural modifications. Here, two novel non-invasive sampling methods were used to examine the cortisol stress response of dispersing salmon fry under different artificial lighting intensities. Fish egg and embryos were reared under differing ALAN intensities and individual measures of stress were subsequently taken from dispersing fry using static sampling, whereas population-level measures were achieved using deployed passive samplers. Dispersing fry exposed to experimental confinement showed elevated cortisol levels, indicating the capacity to mount a stress response at this early stage in ontogenesis. However, only one of the two methods for sampling cortisol used in this study indicated that ALAN may act as a stressor to dispersing salmon fry. As such, a cortisol-mediated response to light was not strongly supported. Furthermore, the efficacy of the two non-invasive methodologies used in this study is, subject to further validation, indicative of them proving useful in future ecological studies.  
  Address School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Museum Avenue, Cardiff CF10 3AX, UK. Tel: +44 (0) 2920 875 729; newmanrc(at)cardiff.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Journals Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2051-1434 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1397  
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Author Ouyang, J.Q; Maaike de Jong, M.H.; Visser, M.E.; van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Ouyang, J.Q url  openurl
  Title Stressful colours: corticosterone concentrations in a free-living songbird vary with the spectral composition of experimental illumination Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Biology Letters Abbreviated Journal Biol. Lett.  
  Volume 11 Issue Pages 20150517  
  Keywords Animals; birds; corticosterone; stress; Parus major; great tit; artificial light; light spectra  
  Abstract Organisms have evolved under natural daily light/dark cycles for millions of years. These cycles have been disturbed as night-time darkness is increasingly replaced by artificial illumination. Investigating the physiological consequences of free-living organisms in artificially lit environments is crucial to determine whether nocturnal lighting disrupts circadian rhythms, changes behaviour, reduces fitness and ultimately affects population numbers. We make use of a unique, large-scale network of replicated field sites which were experimentally illuminated at night using lampposts emanating either red, green, white or no light to test effect on stress hormone concentrations (corticosterone) in a songbird, the great tit (Parus major). Adults nesting in white-light transects had higher corticosterone concentrations than in the other treatments. We also found a significant interaction between distance to the closest lamppost and treatment type: individuals in red light had higher corticosterone levels when they nested closer to the lamppost than individuals nesting farther away, a decline not observed in the green or dark treatment. Individuals with high corticosterone levels had fewer fledglings, irrespective of treatment. These results show that artificial light can induce changes in individual hormonal phenotype. As these effects vary considerably with light spectrum, it opens the possibility to mitigate these effects by selecting street lighting of specific spectra.  
  Address Department of Animal Ecology, The Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, The Netherlands; j.ouyang(at)nioo.knaw.nl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1248  
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Author Pendoley, K.; Kamrowski, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Influence of horizon elevation on the sea-finding behaviour of hatchling flatback turtles exposed to artificial light glow Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Marine Ecology Progress Series Abbreviated Journal Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser.  
  Volume 529 Issue Pages 279-288  
  Keywords Animals; Hatchling orientation; Artificial lighting; Horizon elevation; Marine turtle; Conservation management; Elevation; Industry; Coastal development; Sea turtle; Sea turtle conservation  
  Abstract Marine turtles are threatened globally by increasing coastal development. In particular, increased artificial lighting at the nesting beach has the potential to disrupt turtle breeding success. Few published data exist regarding the behaviour of the flatback turtle Natator depressus, a species endemic to Australia, in response to artificial light. Given the ongoing industrialisation of the Australian coastline, this study is a timely investigation into the orientation of flatback hatchlings exposed to light glow produced by lighting typically used in industrial settings. We recorded the orientation of hatchlings at the nesting beach on Barrow Island, Western Australia, exposed to 3 types of standard lighting — high-pressure sodium vapour (HPS), metal halide (MH), and fluorescent white (FW)—at 3 different intensities. The light array was positioned either behind a high dune (producing a high, dark silhouette; 16° elevation), or in a low creek bed (producing a low silhouette and bright horizon; 2° elevation). At medium and high light intensities of all 3 light types, hatchlings were significantly less ocean-oriented when exposed to light at 2° elevation compared to 16° elevation. This difference remained with glow from low-intensity MH light; however, there was no significant difference in orientation of hatchlings exposed to low- intensity HPS and FW light glow at either elevation. Our study emphasises the importance of horizon elevation cues in hatchling sea-finding. Since all species of marine turtles show similar sea-finding behaviour, our results have important implications for management of lighting adjacent to turtle nesting beaches in Australia and elsewhere, as coastal development continues.  
  Address Pendoley Environmental Pty Ltd, 12A Pitt Way, Booragoon, Western Australia 6154, Australia; ruth.kamrowski@penv.com.au  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1189  
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Author Rakshit, K.; Thomas, A.P.; Matveyenko, A.V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Does disruption of circadian rhythms contribute to beta-cell failure in type 2 diabetes? Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Current Diabetes Reports Abbreviated Journal Curr Diab Rep  
  Volume 14 Issue 4 Pages 474  
  Keywords *epidemiology; diabetes; Type 2 diabetes; beta cell; T2DM; artificial light; light exposure; circadian disruption  
  Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a complex metabolic disease characterized by the loss of beta-cell secretory function and mass. The pathophysiology of beta-cell failure in T2DM involves a complex interaction between genetic susceptibilities and environmental risk factors. One environmental condition that is gaining greater appreciation as a risk factor for T2DM is the disruption of circadian rhythms (eg, shift-work and sleep loss). In recent years, circadian disruption has become increasingly prevalent in modern societies and consistently shown to augment T2DM susceptibility (partly mediated through its effects on pancreatic beta-cells). Since beta-cell failure is essential for development of T2DM, we will review current work from epidemiologic, clinical, and animal studies designed to gain insights into the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying the predisposition to beta-cell failure associated with circadian disruption. Elucidating the role of circadian clocks in regulating beta-cell health will add to our understanding of T2DM pathophysiology and may contribute to the development of novel therapeutic and preventative approaches.  
  Address Larry L. Hillblom Islet Research Center, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, University of California Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, 900A Weyburn Place, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1534-4827 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24532160; PMCID:PMC3988110 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 320  
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