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Author Riley, W.D.; Bendall, B.; Ives, M.J.; Edmonds, N.J.; Maxwell, D.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Street lighting disrupts the diel migratory pattern of wild Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., smolts leaving their natal stream Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Aquaculture Abbreviated Journal Aquaculture  
  Volume 330-333 Issue Pages 74-81  
  Keywords Artificial light; Behaviour; Migration; Salmon; Smolt; Street lighting  
  Abstract The migratory timing and behaviour of wild Atlantic salmon smolts leaving their natal stream was determined using a passive integrated transponder (PIT) antennae system at a study site on a tributary of the River Itchen, England. Experiments compared the downstream migration of smolts under natural control conditions (2000–2006) with two years (2008 and 2009) when the main downstream exit of the study site was subject to street-lit conditions every alternate night (maximum light intensity measured at the stream surface = 14 lx). Migration of smolts under control conditions was significantly (p < 0.01, n = 170) correlated with sunset. By contrast, street lighting resulted in the timing of migration being random (p = 0.11, n = 7; p = 0.76, n = 34, respectively) with respect to time of day. Furthermore, migration of smolts was significantly (p = 0.01, n = 19) correlated with the time of sunset for fish migrating when the lamp had been off, but random (p = 0.36, n = 22) when the lamp had been on (2008 and 2009 data, combined). This alteration in migratory behaviour due to street lighting may impact fitness.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 69  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rowse, E.G., Lewanzik, D.; Stone, E.L.; Harris, S.; Jones, G. url  doi
isbn  openurl
  Title Dark Matters: The Effects of Artificial Lighting on Bats Type Book Chapter
  Year 2015 Publication Bats in the Anthropocene: Conservation of Bats in a Changing World Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 187-213  
  Keywords Animals; bats; vertebrates; ecology; artificial light at night; climate change  
  Abstract While artificial lighting is a major component of global change, its biological impacts have only recently been recognised. Artificial lighting attracts and repels animals in taxon-specific ways and affects physiological processes. Being nocturnal, bats are likely to be strongly affected by artificial lighting. Moreover, many species of bats are insectivorous, and insects are also strongly influenced by lighting. Lighting technologies are changing rapidly, with the use of light-emitting diode (LED) lamps increasing. Impacts on bats and their prey depend on the light spectra produced by street lights ; ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths attract more insects and consequently insectivorous bats. Bat responses to lighting are species-specific and reflect differences in flight morphology and performance ; fast-flying aerial hawking species frequently feed around street lights, whereas relatively slow-flying bats that forage in more confined spaces are often light-averse. Both high-pressure sodium and LED lights reduce commuting activity by clutter-tolerant bats of the genera Myotis and Rhinolophus, and these bats still avoided LED lights when dimmed. Light-induced reductions in the activity of frugivorous bats may affect ecosystem services by reducing dispersal of the seeds of pioneer plants and hence reforestation. Rapid changes in street lighting offer the potential to explore mitigation methods such as part-night lighting (PNL), dimming, directed lighting, and motion-sensitive lighting that may have beneficial consequences for light-averse bat specie.  
  Address School of Life Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK; Gareth.Jones(at)bristol.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor Voigt, C.C.; Kingston; T.  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-3-319-25218-6 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1320  
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Author Schoeman, M.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution at stadiums favors urban exploiter bats: Selected urban exploiter bats hunt insects at stadiums Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Animal Conservation Abbreviated Journal Anim. Conserv.  
  Volume 19 Issue 2 Pages 120–130  
  Keywords Animals; artificial light; light pollution; Molossidae; predator–prey interactions; urban avoiders; urban exploiters; bats; bats; mammals; Chaerephon pumilus; Tadarida aegyptiaca; Otomops martiensseni; Mops condylurus  
  Abstract Artificial night lighting by humans may destabilize ecosystems by altering light-dependent biological processes of organisms and changing the availability of light and darkness as resources of food, information and refuge. I tested the hypothesis that urban exploiters should be more likely to utilize bright, unpredictable light pollution sources such as sport stadiums and building sites than urban avoiders. I quantified insectivorous bat activity and feeding attempts at seven sport stadiums under light and dark treatments using acoustic monitoring of echolocation calls. Species richness estimators indicated that stadium inventories were complete. Activity and feeding attempts were significantly higher at lit stadiums than dark stadiums, irrespective of season or surrounding human land use. Bats exhibited species-specific differences in utilization of stadiums. As predicted, four urban exploiters – Chaerephon pumilus, Tadarida aegyptiaca, Otomops martiensseni and Scotophilus dinganii – dominated activity and feeding attempts at lit stadiums, yet one urban exploiter – Mops condylurus – was associated with dark stadiums. Activity levels at both dark and light stadiums were negatively correlated with peak echolocation frequency. Landscape-scale and finer scale abiotic variables were poor predictors of bat activity and feeding attempts. My results suggest that in addition to abiotic processes associated with urbanization, light pollution at sport stadiums may homogenize urban bat diversity by favoring selected urban exploiters.  
  Address School of Life Sciences, Westville Campus, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa; schoemanc(at)ukzn.ac.za  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1367-9430 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1223  
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Author Schroer, S.; Hölker, F. url  doi
isbn  openurl
  Title Impact of Lighting on Flora and Fauna Type Book Chapter
  Year 2016 Publication Handbook of Advanced Lighting Technology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-33  
  Keywords Ecology; Lighting; Artificial light at night; ALAN; Plants; Animals; review  
  Abstract Technology, especially artificial light at night (ALAN), often has unexpected impacts on the environment. This chapter addresses both the perception of light by various organisms and the impact of ALAN on flora and fauna. The responses to ALAN are subdivided into the effects of light intensity, color spectra, and duration and timing of illumination. The ways organisms perceive light can be as variable as the habitats they live in. ALAN often interferes with natural light information. It is rarely neutral and has significant impacts beyond human perception. For example, UV light reflection of generative plant parts or the direction of light is used by many organisms as information for foraging, finding spawning sites, or communication. Contemporary outdoor lighting often lacks sustainable planning, even though the protection of species, habitat, and human well-being could be improved by adopting simple technical measures. The increasing use of ALAN with high intensities in the blue part of the spectrum, e.g., fluorescent light and LEDs, is discussed as a critical trend. Blue light is a major circadian signal in higher vertebrates and can substantially impact the orientation of organisms such as numerous insect species. A better understanding of how various types and sources of artificial light, and how organisms perceive ALAN, will be an important step towards more sustainable lighting. Such knowledge is the basis for sustainable lighting planning and the development of solutions to protect biodiversity from the effects of outdoor lighting. Maps that describe the rapid changes in ALAN are urgently needed. In addition, measures are required to reduce the increasing use and intensity of ALAN in more remote areas as signaling thresholds in flora and fauna at night are often close to moonlight intensity and far below streetlight levels.  
  Address Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Müggelseedamm 310, 12587, Berlin, Germany; schroer(at)igb-berlin.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-3-319-00295-8 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1470  
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Author Sella, K.N.; Salmon, M.; Witherington, B.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Filtered Streetlights Attract Hatchling Marine Turtles Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Chelonian Conservation and Biology Abbreviated Journal Chelonian Conservation and Biology  
  Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 255-261  
  Keywords Reptilia; Testudines; Cheloniidae; Loggerhead turtle; turtles; marine turtles; reptiles; Caretta caretta; Chelonia mydas; hatchlings; artificial lighting; light “trapping”; orientation; seafinding; Florida  
  Abstract On many nesting beaches, hatchling marine turtles are exposed to poled street lighting that disrupts their ability to crawl to the sea. Experiments were done to determine how hatchlings responded to street lighting transmitted through 2 filters that excluded the most disruptive wavelengths (those <&#8201;530 nm; those <&#8201;570 nm). Filtered lighting, however, also attracted the turtles though not as strongly as an unfiltered (high-pressure sodium vapor) lighting. Filtering is therefore of limited utility for light management, especially since other alternatives (such as lowering, shielding, or turning off unnecessary lighting; use of dimmer lights embedded in roadways) are more effective.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1071-8443 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 78  
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