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Author Kunz, T.H.; Gauthreaux, S.A.J.; Hristov, N.I.; Horn, J.W.; Jones, G.; Kalko, E.K.V.; Larkin, R.P.; McCracken, G.F.; Swartz, S.M.; Srygley, R.B.; Dudley, R.; Westbrook, J.K.; Wikelski, M.
Title Aeroecology: probing and modeling the aerosphere Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication Integrative and Comparative Biology Abbreviated Journal Integr Comp Biol
Volume 48 Issue 1 Pages 1-11
Keywords aeroecology; light; biology
Abstract Aeroecology is a discipline that embraces and integrates the domains of atmospheric science, ecology, earth science, geography, computer science, computational biology, and engineering. The unifying concept that underlies this emerging discipline is its focus on the planetary boundary layer, or aerosphere, and the myriad of organisms that, in large part, depend upon this environment for their existence. The aerosphere influences both daily and seasonal movements of organisms, and its effects have both short- and long-term consequences for species that use this environment. The biotic interactions and physical conditions in the aerosphere represent important selection pressures that influence traits such as size and shape of organisms, which in turn facilitate both passive and active displacements. The aerosphere also influences the evolution of behavioral, sensory, metabolic, and respiratory functions of organisms in a myriad of ways. In contrast to organisms that depend strictly on terrestrial or aquatic existence, those that routinely use the aerosphere are almost immediately influenced by changing atmospheric conditions (e.g., winds, air density, precipitation, air temperature), sunlight, polarized light, moon light, and geomagnetic and gravitational forces. The aerosphere has direct and indirect effects on organisms, which often are more strongly influenced than those that spend significant amounts of time on land or in water. Future advances in aeroecology will be made when research conducted by biologists is more fully integrated across temporal and spatial scales in concert with advances made by atmospheric scientists and mathematical modelers. Ultimately, understanding how organisms such as arthropods, birds, and bats aloft are influenced by a dynamic aerosphere will be of importance for assessing, and maintaining ecosystem health, human health, and biodiversity.
Address *Center for Ecology and Conservation Biology, Department of Biology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA; Department of Biological Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634, USA; School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Woodland Road, Bristol BS8 1UG, UK; Department of Experimental Ecology, University of Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89069, Ulm, Germany; Illinois Natural History Survey, 607 East Peabody Drive, Champaign, IL 61820, USA; Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1610, USA; Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, USA; **USDA-ARS, 1500 N. Central Avenue, Sidney, MT 59270, USA; Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; USDA-ARS, 2771 F&B Road, College Station, TX 77845, USA and Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton NJ 08544, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1540-7063 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21669768 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 19
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Author Lahti, T.; Merikanto, I.; Partonen, T.
Title Circadian clock disruptions and the risk of cancer Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Annals of Medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Med
Volume 44 Issue 8 Pages 847-853
Keywords Human Health; Cell Division; Chronobiology Disorders/*complications/genetics/*physiopathology; Circadian Clocks/*genetics; Humans; Neoplasms/*etiology; Work Schedule Tolerance/physiology
Abstract Disrupted circadian rhythms may lead to failures in the control of the cell division cycle and the subsequent malignant cell growth. In order to understand the pathogenesis of cancer more in detail, it is crucial to identify those mechanisms of action which contribute to the loss of control of the cell division cycle. This mini-review focuses on the recent findings concerning the links between the human circadian clock and cancer. Clinical implications concern not only feasible methods for the assessment of the circadian time of an individual or for the determination of the best time for administration of a drug of treatment, but also in the future genetic tests for screening and for planning treatment.
Address Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0785-3890 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23072403 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 513
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Author Le Tallec, T.; Théry, M.; Perret, M.
Title Melatonin concentrations and timing of seasonal reproduction in male mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus) exposed to light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Journal of Mammalogy Abbreviated Journal J of Mammalogy
Volume 97 Issue 3 Pages 753-760
Keywords Animals; light pollution; photobiology; core temperature; locomotor activity; melatonin; Microcebus murinus; primate; testosterone; lemurs; mouse lemur
Abstract Adverse effects of light at night are associated with human health problems and with changes in seasonal reproduction in several species. Owing to its role in the circadian timing system, melatonin production is suspected to mediate excess nocturnal light. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of light pollution on the timing of seasonal reproduction on a strict Malagasy long-day breeder, the nocturnal mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus). We randomly exposed 12 males in wintering sexual rest to moonlight or to a light-mimicking nocturnal streetlight for 5 weeks. We monitored urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin concentrations (aMT6s), plasma testosterone concentrations, and testis size, and we recorded daily rhythms of core temperature and locomotor activity. In males exposed to light pollution, we observed a significant decrease in urinary aMT6s concentrations associated with changes in daily rhythm profiles and with activation of reproductive function. These results showed that males entered spontaneous sexual recrudescence leading to a summer acclimatization state, which suggests that light at night disrupts perception of day length cues, leading to an inappropriate photoentrainment of seasonal rhythms.
Address UMR 7179 Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle , 1 avenue du petit château, 91800 Brunoy, France; thery(at)mnhn.fr
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Oxford University Press Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1348
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Author LeGates, T.A.; Fernandez, D.C.; Hattar, S.
Title Light as a central modulator of circadian rhythms, sleep and affect Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Nature Reviews. Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Nat Rev Neurosci
Volume 15 Issue 7 Pages 443-454
Keywords light at night; photobiology; circadian disruption; asynchronization; sleep; mood; review
Abstract Light has profoundly influenced the evolution of life on earth. As widely appreciated, light enables us to generate images of our environment. However, light – through intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) – also influences behaviours that are essential for our health and quality of life but are independent of image formation. These include the synchronization of the circadian clock to the solar day, tracking of seasonal changes and the regulation of sleep. Irregular light environments lead to problems in circadian rhythms and sleep, which eventually cause mood and learning deficits. Recently, it was found that irregular light can also directly affect mood and learning without producing major disruptions in circadian rhythms and sleep. In this Review, we discuss the indirect and direct influence of light on mood and learning, and provide a model for how light, the circadian clock and sleep interact to influence mood and cognitive functions.
Address 1] Johns Hopkins University, Department of Biology, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA. [2] Johns Hopkins University, Department of Neuroscience, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-003X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24917305 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 299
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Author Lucas, M.A.; Chahl, J.S.
Title Challenges for biomimetic night time sky polarization navigation Type Conference Article
Year 2016 Publication Proceedings of the SPIE Abbreviated Journal Proc SPIE
Volume 9797 Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; detection of light; biology; polarization; navigation
Abstract Studies on some species of insects have shown them to use the polarization pattern cast by the moon in the night sky to control heading. Additional heading cues are of value to autonomous systems, since the earth’s magnetic field is not uniform, often not available and is substantially modified by local phenomena. In addition to the required low-light sensitivity of a night time polarization compass, additional complexities caused by the relative intensity of terrestrial sources must be overcome. We will show that the end result will tend to be a less reliable compass than the equivalent day time polarization device.
Address Univ. of South Australia, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SPIE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1430
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