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Author Adams, C.A.; Blumenthal, A.; Fernández-Juricic, E.; Bayne, E.; St. Clair, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of anthropogenic light on bird movement, habitat selection, and distribution: a systematic map protocol Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental Evidence Abbreviated Journal Environ Evid  
  Volume 8 Issue S1 Pages 13  
  Keywords Animals; BirdsDepartment of Biological Science, University of Alberta, CW 405, Biological Sciences Building, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E9, Canada  
  Abstract Anthropogenic light is known or suspected to exert profound effects on many taxa, including birds. Documentation of bird aggregation around artificial light at night, as well as observations of bird reactions to strobe lights and lasers, suggests that light may both attract and repel birds, although this assumption has yet to be tested. These effects may cause immediate changes to bird movement, habitat selection and settlement, and ultimately alter bird distribution at large spatial scales. Global increases in the extent of anthropogenic light contribute to interest by wildlife managers and the public in managing light to reduce harm to birds, but there are no evidence syntheses of the multiple ways light affects birds to guide this effort. Existing reviews usually emphasize either bird aggregation or deterrence and do so for a specific context, such as aggregation at communication towers and deterrence from airports. We outline a protocol for a systematic map that collects and organizes evidence from the many contexts in which anthropogenic light is reported to affect bird movement, habitat selection, or distribution. Our map will provide an objective synthesis of the evidence that identifies subtopics that may support systematic review and knowledge gaps that could direct future research questions. These products will substantially advance an understanding of both patterns and processes associated with the responses of birds to anthropogenic light.  
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  ISSN 2047-2382 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2547  
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Author Arnaud Da Silva, Jelmer M. Samplonius, Emmi Schlicht, Mihai Valcu, Bart Kempenaers url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial night lighting rather than traffic noise affects the daily timing of dawn and dusk singing in common European songbirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Behavioral Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 25 Issue 5 Pages 1037-1047  
  Keywords animal, birds, dawn chorus, dusk chorus, light intensity, light pollution, noise pollution, seasonality, songbird, weather  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1105  
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Author Baker, G.C.; Dekker, R.W.R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lunar synchrony in the reproduction of the Moluccan Megapode Megapodius wallacei Type Journal Article
  Year 2000 Publication Ibis Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 142 Issue 3 Pages 382-388  
  Keywords Moluccan Megapode; Megapodius wallacei; birds; nesting; reproduction; animals; *Moon  
  Abstract The Moluccan Megapode Megapodius wallacei uses heat generated by the sun to incubate its eggs. It buries the eggs deep in the sand of sun-exposed beaches and open sandy areas on islands in the Moluccas, Indonesia. The eggs are laid at night and left to incubate for two to three months without parental care. We present evidence that the Moluccan Megapode exhibits lunar synchrony in the timing of egg-laying, its spatial distribution of egg burrows and in its behaviour at communal nesting grounds. More Moluccan Megapodes visit the nesting grounds on bright nights than during the new moon. Data collected on the spatial distribution and depth of egg burrows also exhibit lunar periodicity. On moonlit nights, the birds excavate burrows in communal groups and spend longer at the nesting ground digging deeper burrows. Lunaphilia and lunar periodicity of reproduction are rarely documented in birds. We discuss possible explanations for these behaviours in the Moluccan Megapode.  
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  ISSN 0019-1019 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 52  
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Author Becker, D.J.; Singh, D.; Pan, Q.; Montoure, J.D.; Talbott, K.M.; Wanamaker, S.M.; Ketterson, E.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night amplifies seasonal relapse of haemosporidian parasites in a widespread songbird Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci  
  Volume 287 Issue 1935 Pages 20201831  
  Keywords *Animal Migration; Animals; Breeding; Parasitemia; Parasites; Recurrence; Seasons; Songbirds/*parasitology; *Junco hyemalis; *avian malaria; *ecoimmunology; *generalized additive models; *photoperiod; *urbanization  
  Abstract Urban habitats can shape interactions between hosts and parasites by altering not only exposure rates but also within-host processes. Artificial light at night (ALAN) is common in urban environments, and chronic exposure can impair host immunity in ways that may increase infection. However, studies of causal links between this stressor, immunity, and infection dynamics are rare, particularly in migratory animals. Here, we experimentally tested how ALAN affects cellular immunity and haemosporidian parasite intensity across the annual cycle of migrant and resident subspecies of the dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis). We monitored an experimental group exposed to light at night and a control group under natural light/dark cycles as they passed through short days simulating early spring to longer days simulating the breeding season, followed by autumn migration. Using generalized additive mixed models, we show that ALAN increased inflammation, and leucocyte counts were greatest in early spring and autumn. At the start of the experiment, few birds had active infections based on microscopy, but PCR revealed many birds had chronic infections. ALAN increased parasitaemia across the annual cycle, with strong peaks in spring and autumn that were largely absent in control birds. As birds were kept in indoor aviaries to prevent vector exposure, this increased parasitaemia indicates relapse of chronic infection during costly life-history stages (i.e. reproduction). Although the immunological and parasitological time series were in phase for control birds, cross-correlation analyses also revealed ALAN desynchronized leucocyte profiles and parasitaemia, which could suggest a general exaggerated inflammatory response. Our study shows how a common anthropogenic influence can shape within-host processes to affect infection dynamics.  
  Address Environmental Resilience Institute, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA; danbeck ( at ) iu.edu  
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  Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32962545; PMCID:PMC7542808 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3368  
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Author Canário, F.; Hespanhol Leitão, A.; Tomé, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Predation Attempts by Short-eared and Long-eared Owls on Migrating Songbirds Attracted to Artificial Lights Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Raptor Research Abbreviated Journal Journal of Raptor Research  
  Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 232-234  
  Keywords Asio otus; Long-eared Owl; birds; Asio flammeus; Short-eared Owl; artificial light; migration; predation  
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  ISSN 0892-1016 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 61  
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