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Author Kaniewska, P.; Alon, S.; Karako-Lampert, S.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.; Levy, O.
Title Signaling cascades and the importance of moonlight in coral broadcast mass spawning Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication eLife Abbreviated Journal
Volume 4 Issue Pages e09991
Keywords Animals; coral; chronobiology; reproductive strategies; reproductive synchronization; Great Barrier Reef; neurohormones; marine; oceans; invertebrates
Abstract Many reef-building corals participate in a mass-spawning event that occurs yearly on the Great Barrier Reef. This coral reproductive event is one of earth's most prominent examples of synchronised behavior, and coral reproductive success is vital to the persistence of coral reef ecosystems. Although several environmental cues have been implicated in the timing of mass spawning, the specific sensory cues that function together with endogenous clock mechanisms to ensure accurate timing of gamete release are largely unknown. Here, we show that moonlight is an important external stimulus for mass spawning synchrony and describe the potential mechanisms underlying the ability of corals to detect environmental triggers for the signaling cascades that ultimately result in gamete release. Our study increases the understanding of reproductive chronobiology in corals and strongly supports the hypothesis that coral gamete release is achieved by a complex array of potential neurohormones and light-sensing molecules.
Address Global Change Institute and ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia; oveh(at)uq.edu.au
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher eLife Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2050-084X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1321
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Author Kantermann, T.; Roenneberg, T.
Title Is light-at-night a health risk factor or a health risk predictor? Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 26 Issue 6 Pages 1069-1074
Keywords *Chronobiology Disorders; Circadian Rhythm; Environmental Exposure; Humans; *Light; Neoplasms; Risk Factors
Abstract In 2007, the IARC (WHO) has classified “shift-work that involves circadian disruption” as potentially carcinogenic. Ample evidence leaves no doubt that shift-work is detrimental for health, but the mechanisms behind this effect are not well understood. The hormone melatonin is often considered to be a causal link between night shift and tumor development. The underlying “light-at-night” (LAN) hypothesis is based on the following chain of arguments: melatonin is a hormone produced under the control of the circadian clock at night, and its synthesis can be suppressed by light; as an indolamine, it potentially acts as a scavenger of oxygen radicals, which in turn can damage DNA, which in turn can cause cancer. Although there is no experimental evidence that LAN is at the basis of increased cancer rates in shiftworkers, the scenario “light at night can cause cancer” influences research, medicine, the lighting industry and (via the media) also the general public, well beyond shiftwork. It is even suggested that baby-lights, TVs, computers, streetlights, moonlight, emergency lights, or any so-called “light pollution” by urban developments cause cancer via the mechanisms proposed by the LAN hypothesis. Our commentary addresses the growing concern surrounding light pollution. We revisit the arguments of the LAN theory and put them into perspective regarding circadian physiology, physical likelihood (e.g., what intensities reach the retina), and potential risks, specifically in non-shiftworkers.
Address Institute for Medical Psychology, University of Munich LMU, Munich, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19731106 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 134
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Author Karatsoreos, I.N.
Title Effects of circadian disruption on mental and physical health Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports Abbreviated Journal Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep
Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 218-225
Keywords Chronobiology Disorders/*complications/genetics; Circadian Clocks/genetics; Cognition Disorders/*etiology/genetics; Humans; Metabolic Diseases/*etiology/genetics; Obesity/*etiology/genetics
Abstract Circadian (daily) rhythms in physiology and behavior are phylogenetically ancient and are present in almost all plants and animals. In mammals, these rhythms are generated by a master circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, which in turn synchronizes “peripheral oscillators” throughout the brain and body in almost all cell types and organ systems. Although circadian rhythms are phylogenetically ancient, modern industrialized society and the ubiquity of electric lighting has resulted in a fundamental alteration in the relationship between an individual's endogenous circadian rhythmicity and the external environment. The ramifications of this desynchronization for mental and physical health are not fully understood, although numerous lines of evidence are emerging that link defects in circadian timing with negative health outcomes. This article explores the function of the circadian system, the effects of disrupted clocks on the brain and body, and how these effects impact mental and physical health.
Address Department of Veterinary and Comparative Anatomy, Pharmacology, and Physiology, Washington State University, 205 Wegner Hall, Pullman, WA 99164, USA. iliak@vetmed.wsu.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1528-4042 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22322663 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 146
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Author Lahti, T.; Merikanto, I.; Partonen, T.
Title Circadian clock disruptions and the risk of cancer Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Annals of Medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Med
Volume 44 Issue 8 Pages 847-853
Keywords Human Health; Cell Division; Chronobiology Disorders/*complications/genetics/*physiopathology; Circadian Clocks/*genetics; Humans; Neoplasms/*etiology; Work Schedule Tolerance/physiology
Abstract Disrupted circadian rhythms may lead to failures in the control of the cell division cycle and the subsequent malignant cell growth. In order to understand the pathogenesis of cancer more in detail, it is crucial to identify those mechanisms of action which contribute to the loss of control of the cell division cycle. This mini-review focuses on the recent findings concerning the links between the human circadian clock and cancer. Clinical implications concern not only feasible methods for the assessment of the circadian time of an individual or for the determination of the best time for administration of a drug of treatment, but also in the future genetic tests for screening and for planning treatment.
Address Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0785-3890 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23072403 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 513
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Author Mormont, M.-C.; Levi, F.
Title Cancer chronotherapy: principles, applications, and perspectives Type Journal Article
Year 2003 Publication Cancer Abbreviated Journal Cancer
Volume 97 Issue 1 Pages 155-169
Keywords Human Health; Animals; Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/*administration & dosage; Chronobiology Phenomena; *Chronotherapy; Colorectal Neoplasms/*drug therapy; Drug Tolerance; Humans; Models, Biological; Prognosis; Quality of Life
Abstract BACKGROUND: Cell physiology is regulated along the 24-hour timescale by a circadian clock, which is comprised of interconnected molecular loops involving at least nine genes. The cellular clocks are coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus, a hypothalamic pacemaker that also helps the organism adjust to environmental cycles. The rest-activity rhythm is a reliable marker of the circadian system function in both rodents and humans. This circadian organization is responsible for predictable changes in the tolerability and efficacy of anticancer agents, and possibly also may be involved in tumor promotion or growth. METHODS: Expected least toxic times of chemotherapy were extrapolated from experimental models to human subjects with reference to the rest-activity cycle. The clinical relevance of the chronotherapy principle (i.e., treatment administration as a function of rhythms) has been investigated previously in randomized multicenter trials. RESULTS: In the current study, chronotherapeutic schedules were used to safely document activity of the combination of oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and leucovorin against metastatic colorectal carcinoma and to establish new medicosurgical management for this disease, and were reported to result in unprecedented long-term survival. CONCLUSIONS: Chronotherapy concepts appear to offer further potential to improve current cancer treatment options as well as to optimize the development of new anticancer or supportive agents.
Address EPI 0118 INSERM Chronotherapeutique des cancers and Service de Cancerologie, Hopital Paul Brousse (I.C.I.G), 94800 Villejuif Cedex, France
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0008-543X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:12491517 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 785
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