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Author (up) Bonmati-Carrion, M.; Arguelles-Prieto, R.; Martinez-Madrid, M.; Reiter, R.; Hardeland, R.; Rol, M.; Madrid, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Protecting the Melatonin Rhythm through Circadian Healthy Light Exposure Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication International Journal of Molecular Sciences Abbreviated Journal IJMS  
  Volume 15 Issue 12 Pages 23448-23500  
  Keywords human health; chronodisruption; circadian; light at night (LAN); melanopsin; melatonin  
  Abstract Currently, in developed countries, nights are excessively illuminated (light at night), whereas daytime is mainly spent indoors, and thus people are exposed to much lower light intensities than under natural conditions. In spite of the positive impact of artificial light, we pay a price for the easy access to light during the night: disorganization of our circadian system or chronodisruption (CD), including perturbations in melatonin rhythm. Epidemiological studies show that CD is associated with an increased incidence of diabetes, obesity, heart disease, cognitive and affective impairment, premature aging and some types of cancer. Knowledge of retinal photoreceptors and the discovery of melanopsin in some ganglion cells demonstrate that light intensity, timing and spectrum must be considered to keep the biological clock properly entrained. Importantly, not all wavelengths of light are equally chronodisrupting. Blue light, which is particularly beneficial during the daytime, seems to be more disruptive at night, and induces the strongest melatonin inhibition. Nocturnal blue light exposure is currently increasing, due to the proliferation of energy-efficient lighting (LEDs) and electronic devices. Thus, the development of lighting systems that preserve the melatonin rhythm could reduce the health risks induced by chronodisruption. This review addresses the state of the art regarding the crosstalk between light and the circadian system.  
  Address Department of Physiology, Faculty of Biology, University of Murcia, Murcia 30100, Spain  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1422-0067 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1078  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cornean, R.E.; Margescu, M.; Simionescu, B. url  openurl
  Title Disruption of the Cyrcadian System and Obesity Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Jurnalul Pediatrului Abbreviated Journal Jurnalul Pediatrului  
  Volume XVIII Issue Supplement 3 Pages 38-42  
  Keywords Human Health; sleep deprivation; circadian rhythms; *Chronobiology Disorders; chronodisruption; obesity  
  Abstract Disruption of the cyrcadian system is a relatively new concept incriminated as being responsible for obesity, cardiovascular involvement, cognitive impairment, premature aging and last but not least, cancer. Because obesity is undoubtedly assimilated today to the medical conditions related to the disruption of the normal chronobiology, this paper presents the pivotal role of chronodisruption in the neuroendocrine control of appetite among these patients.  
  Address University of Medicine and Pharmacy "Iuliu Hatieganu” Cluj – Napoca, Romania; recornean(as)yahoo.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Romanian Society of Pediatric Surgery Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2065-4855 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1349  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Dominoni, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effects of light pollution on biological rhythms of birds: an integrated, mechanistic perspective Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Ornithology Abbreviated Journal J. of Ornith.  
  Volume 156 Issue 1 Pages 409-418  
  Keywords Animals; Birds; Light pollution; Circadian rhythms; Annual rhythms; Chronodisruption; Melatonin; Deep brain photoreceptors; ipRGCs  
  Abstract Light pollution is considered a threat for biodiversity given the extent to which it can affect a vast number of behavioral and physiological processes in several species. This comes as no surprise as light is a fundamental, environmental cue through which organisms time their daily and seasonal activities, and alterations in the light environment have been found to affect profoundly the synchronization of the circadian clock, the endogenous mechanism that tracks and predicts variation in the external light/dark cycles. In this context, birds have been one of the most studied animal taxa, but our understanding of the effects of light pollution on the biological rhythms of avian species is mostly limited to behavioral responses. In order to understand which proximate mechanisms may be affected by artificial lights, we need an integrated perspective that focuses on light as a physiological signal, and especially on how photic information is perceived, decoded, and transmitted through the whole body. The aim of this review is to summarize the effects of light pollution on physiological and biochemical mechanisms that underlie changes in birds’ behavior, highlighting the current gaps in our knowledge and proposing future research avenues.  
  Address Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK; davide.dominoni@glasgow.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1167  
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Author (up) Erren, T.C.; Morfeld, P.; Foster, R.G.; Reiter, R.J.; Gross, J.V.; Westermann, I.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sleep and cancer: Synthesis of experimental data and meta-analyses of cancer incidence among some 1 500 000 study individuals in 13 countries Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 33 Issue 4 Pages 325-350  
  Keywords Human Health; Cancer; chronodisruption; meta-analyses; napping; sleep and circadian rhythm disruption (SCRD); sleep duration; sleep quality; sleep timing; Circadian Rhythm; sleep; Oncogenesis  
  Abstract Sleep and its impact on physiology and pathophysiology are researched at an accelerating pace and from many different angles. Experiments provide evidence for chronobiologically plausible links between chronodisruption and sleep and circadian rhythm disruption (SCRD), on the one hand, and the development of cancer, on the other. Epidemiological evidence from cancer incidence among some 1 500 000 study individuals in 13 countries regarding associations with sleep duration, napping or “poor sleep” is variable and inconclusive. Combined adjusted relative risks (meta-RRs) for female breast cancer, based on heterogeneous data, were 1.01 (95% CI: 0.97-1.06). Meta-RRs for cancers of the colorectum and of the lung in women and men and for prostate cancer were 1.08 (95% CI: 1.03-1.13), 1.11 (95% CI: 1.00-1.22) and 1.05 (95% CI: 0.83-1.33), respectively. The significantly increased meta-RRs for colorectal cancer, based on homogeneous data, warrant targeted study. However, the paramount epidemiological problem inhibiting valid conclusions about the associations between sleep and cancer is the probable misclassification of the exposures to facets of sleep over time. Regarding the inevitable conclusion that more research is needed to answer How are sleep and cancer linked in humans? we offer eight sets of recommendations for future studies which must take note of the complexity of multidirectional relationships.  
  Address a Institute and Policlinic for Occupational Medicine, Environmental Medicine and Prevention Research , University of Cologne , Cologne , Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27003385 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1407  
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Author (up) Reiter, R.J.; Rosales-Corral, S.; Coto-Montes, A.; Antonio Boga, J.; Tan, D.X.; Davis, J.M.; Konturek, P.C.; Konturek, S.J.; Brzozowski, T. url  openurl
  Title The photoperiod, circadian regulation and chronodisruption: the requisite interplay between the suprachiasmatic nuclei and the pineal and gut melatonin. Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 62 Issue Pages 269-274  
  Keywords Human Health; biological clock; chronodisruption; circadian rhythm; gastrointestinal melatonin; peptic ulcer; pineal gland; suprachiasmatic nucleus  
  Abstract Biological rhythms are essential for optimal health (1, 2). Throughout the course of human evolution, hominids were exposed to regularly alternating periods of light and dark during every 24-hour period. This evolutionary period, which for humans may have lasted for three million or more years, allowed species to take advantage of the light:dark cycle to adjust their physiology and to synchronize it with the prevailing light:dark environment. To take advantage of this information, vertebrates, including hominids, evolved a group of neurons to monitor the photoperiodic environment and to adjust organismal, organ and cellular function accordingly.

This paired group of light-responsive neurons is located in the mediobasal preoptic area at the diencephalic-telencephalic junction just anterior to the hypothalamus. Since these neurons lie immediately above the decussating axons of the optic nerve, i.e., the optic chiasma, they are named the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) (3, 4). The SCN orchestrate all known circadian rhythms in vertebrates and are referred to as the master biological clock or the central rhythm generator.
 
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 522  
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