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Author (up) Dominoni, D.M.; Helm, B.; Lehmann, M.; Dowse, H.B.; Partecke, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Clocks for the city: circadian differences between forest and city songbirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences / The Royal Society Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci  
  Volume 280 Issue 1763 Pages 20130593  
  Keywords Animals; Circadian Clocks/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm; Cities; *Ecosystem; Light; Male; Songbirds/classification/*physiology; Trees; Urbanization; birds; chronotype; circadian rhythms; light at night; radio-telemetry; urbanization  
  Abstract To keep pace with progressing urbanization organisms must cope with extensive habitat change. Anthropogenic light and noise have modified differences between day and night, and may thereby interfere with circadian clocks. Urbanized species, such as birds, are known to advance their activity to early morning and night hours. We hypothesized that such modified activity patterns are reflected by properties of the endogenous circadian clock. Using automatic radio-telemetry, we tested this idea by comparing activity patterns of free-living forest and city European blackbirds (Turdus merula). We then recaptured the same individuals and recorded their activity under constant conditions. City birds started their activity earlier and had faster but less robust circadian oscillation of locomotor activity than forest conspecifics. Circadian period length predicted start of activity in the field, and this relationship was mainly explained by fast-paced and early-rising city birds. Although based on only two populations, our findings point to links between city life, chronotype and circadian phenotype in songbirds, and potentially in other organisms that colonize urban habitats, and highlight that urban environments can significantly modify biologically important rhythms in wild organisms.  
  Address Department of Migration and Immuno-ecology, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Radolfzell 78479, Germany. ddominoni@orn.mpg.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23740778; PMCID:PMC3774226 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 42  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Kantermann, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian biology: sleep-styles shaped by light-styles Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 23 Issue 16 Pages R689-90  
  Keywords Human Health; Circadian Clocks/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; *Lighting; Male; *Photoperiod; *Sunlight  
  Abstract Light and darkness are the main time cues synchronising all biological clocks to the external environment. This little understood evolutionary phenomenon is called circadian entrainment. A new study illuminates our understanding of how modern light- and lifestyles compromise circadian entrainment and impact our biological clocks.  
  Address Chronobiology – Centre for Behaviour and Neurosciences, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 7, 9747 AG Groningen, The Netherlands. thomas@kantermann.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23968925 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 501  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Karatsoreos, I.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of circadian disruption on mental and physical health Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports Abbreviated Journal Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep  
  Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 218-225  
  Keywords Chronobiology Disorders/*complications/genetics; Circadian Clocks/genetics; Cognition Disorders/*etiology/genetics; Humans; Metabolic Diseases/*etiology/genetics; Obesity/*etiology/genetics  
  Abstract Circadian (daily) rhythms in physiology and behavior are phylogenetically ancient and are present in almost all plants and animals. In mammals, these rhythms are generated by a master circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, which in turn synchronizes “peripheral oscillators” throughout the brain and body in almost all cell types and organ systems. Although circadian rhythms are phylogenetically ancient, modern industrialized society and the ubiquity of electric lighting has resulted in a fundamental alteration in the relationship between an individual's endogenous circadian rhythmicity and the external environment. The ramifications of this desynchronization for mental and physical health are not fully understood, although numerous lines of evidence are emerging that link defects in circadian timing with negative health outcomes. This article explores the function of the circadian system, the effects of disrupted clocks on the brain and body, and how these effects impact mental and physical health.  
  Address Department of Veterinary and Comparative Anatomy, Pharmacology, and Physiology, Washington State University, 205 Wegner Hall, Pullman, WA 99164, USA. iliak@vetmed.wsu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1528-4042 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22322663 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 146  
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Author (up) Lahti, T.; Merikanto, I.; Partonen, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian clock disruptions and the risk of cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Annals of Medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Med  
  Volume 44 Issue 8 Pages 847-853  
  Keywords Human Health; Cell Division; Chronobiology Disorders/*complications/genetics/*physiopathology; Circadian Clocks/*genetics; Humans; Neoplasms/*etiology; Work Schedule Tolerance/physiology  
  Abstract Disrupted circadian rhythms may lead to failures in the control of the cell division cycle and the subsequent malignant cell growth. In order to understand the pathogenesis of cancer more in detail, it is crucial to identify those mechanisms of action which contribute to the loss of control of the cell division cycle. This mini-review focuses on the recent findings concerning the links between the human circadian clock and cancer. Clinical implications concern not only feasible methods for the assessment of the circadian time of an individual or for the determination of the best time for administration of a drug of treatment, but also in the future genetic tests for screening and for planning treatment.  
  Address Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0785-3890 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23072403 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 513  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Li, M.-D.; Li, C.-M.; Wang, Z. url  openurl
  Title The Role of Circadian Clocks in Metabolic Disease Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 85 Issue 3 Pages 387–401  
  Keywords Animals; circadian clocks; metabolism; metabolic disease  
  Abstract The circadian clock is a highly conserved timing system, resonating physiological processes to 24-hour environmental cycles. Circadian misalignment is emerging as a risk factor of metabolic disease. The molecular clock resides in all metabolic tissues, the dysfunction of which is associated with perturbed energy metabolism. In this article, we will review current knowledge about molecular mechanisms of the circadian clock and the role of clocks in the physiology and pathophysiology of metabolic tissues.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 392  
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