toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Savvidis, C.; Koutsilieris, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian rhythm disruption in cancer biology Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Molecular Medicine (Cambridge, Mass.) Abbreviated Journal Mol Med  
  Volume 18 Issue (up) Pages 1249-1260  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; CLOCK Proteins/genetics/metabolism; Circadian Clocks/genetics; *Circadian Rhythm/genetics; Environment; Humans; Melatonin/metabolism; Neoplasms/genetics/pathology/*physiopathology/therapy  
  Abstract Circadian rhythms show universally a 24-h oscillation pattern in metabolic, physiological and behavioral functions of almost all species. This pattern is due to a fundamental adaptation to the rotation of Earth around its own axis. Molecular mechanisms of generation of circadian rhythms organize a biochemical network in suprachiasmatic nucleus and peripheral tissues, building cell autonomous clock pacemakers. Rhythmicity is observed in transcriptional expression of a wide range of clock-controlled genes that regulate a variety of normal cell functions, such as cell division and proliferation. Desynchrony of this rhythmicity seems to be implicated in several pathologic conditions, including tumorigenesis and progression of cancer. In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) categorized “shiftwork that involves circadian disruption [as] probably carcinogenic to humans” (Group 2A in the IARC classification system of carcinogenic potency of an agentagent) (Painting, Firefighting, and Shiftwork; IARC; 2007). This review discusses the potential relation between disruptions of normal circadian rhythms with genetic driving machinery of cancer. Elucidation of the role of clockwork disruption, such as exposure to light at night and sleep disruption, in cancer biology could be important in developing new targeted anticancer therapies, optimizing individualized chronotherapy and modifying lighting environment in workplaces or homes.  
  Address Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hippocration General Hospital, Athens, Greece. csavvidis@med.uoa.gr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1076-1551 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22811066; PMCID:PMC3521792 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 514  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sahar, S.; Sassone-Corsi, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Regulation of metabolism: the circadian clock dictates the time Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism: TEM Abbreviated Journal Trends Endocrinol Metab  
  Volume 23 Issue (up) 1 Pages 1-8  
  Keywords Animals; Chronobiology Disorders/metabolism; *Circadian Clocks; *Circadian Rhythm; Circadian Rhythm Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism; *Energy Metabolism; Humans; Metabolome  
  Abstract Circadian rhythms occur with a periodicity of approximately 24h and regulate a wide array of metabolic and physiologic functions. Accumulating epidemiological and genetic evidence indicates that disruption of circadian rhythms can be directly linked to many pathological conditions, including sleep disorders, depression, metabolic syndrome and cancer. Intriguingly, several molecular gears constituting the clock machinery have been found to establish functional interplays with regulators of cellular metabolism. Although the circadian clock regulates multiple metabolic pathways, metabolite availability and feeding behavior can in turn regulate the circadian clock. An in-depth understanding of this reciprocal regulation of circadian rhythms and cellular metabolism may provide insights into the development of therapeutic intervention against specific metabolic disorders.  
  Address Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism, School of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1043-2760 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22169754; PMCID:PMC3259741 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 151  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Santhi, N.; Thorne, H.C.; van der Veen, D.R.; Johnsen, S.; Mills, S.L.; Hommes, V.; Schlangen, L.J.M.; Archer, S.N.; Dijk, D.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The spectral composition of evening light and individual differences in the suppression of melatonin and delay of sleep in humans Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res  
  Volume 53 Issue (up) 1 Pages 47-59  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; *Circadian Clocks; Cross-Sectional Studies; Electroencephalography; Female; Humans; Male; Melatonin/*metabolism; Photic Stimulation; *Photoperiod; Rod Opsins/*metabolism; *Sleep; *Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/etiology/metabolism/physiopathology; Time Factors  
  Abstract The effect of light on circadian rhythms and sleep is mediated by a multi-component photoreceptive system of rods, cones and melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. The intensity and spectral sensitivity characteristics of this system are to be fully determined. Whether the intensity and spectral composition of light exposure at home in the evening is such that it delays circadian rhythms and sleep also remains to be established. We monitored light exposure at home during 6-8wk and assessed light effects on sleep and circadian rhythms in the laboratory. Twenty-two women and men (23.1+/-4.7yr) participated in a six-way, cross-over design using polychromatic light conditions relevant to the light exposure at home, but with reduced, intermediate or enhanced efficacy with respect to the photopic and melanopsin systems. The evening rise of melatonin, sleepiness and EEG-assessed sleep onset varied significantly (P<0.01) across the light conditions, and these effects appeared to be largely mediated by the melanopsin, rather than the photopic system. Moreover, there were individual differences in the sensitivity to the disruptive effect of light on melatonin, which were robust against experimental manipulations (intra-class correlation=0.44). The data show that light at home in the evening affects circadian physiology and imply that the spectral composition of artificial light can be modified to minimize this disruptive effect on sleep and circadian rhythms. These findings have implications for our understanding of the contribution of artificial light exposure to sleep and circadian rhythm disorders such as delayed sleep phase disorder.  
  Address Surrey Sleep Research Centre, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK. n.santhi@surrey.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22017511 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 802  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kantermann, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian biology: sleep-styles shaped by light-styles Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 23 Issue (up) 16 Pages R689-90  
  Keywords Human Health; Circadian Clocks/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; *Lighting; Male; *Photoperiod; *Sunlight  
  Abstract Light and darkness are the main time cues synchronising all biological clocks to the external environment. This little understood evolutionary phenomenon is called circadian entrainment. A new study illuminates our understanding of how modern light- and lifestyles compromise circadian entrainment and impact our biological clocks.  
  Address Chronobiology – Centre for Behaviour and Neurosciences, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 7, 9747 AG Groningen, The Netherlands. thomas@kantermann.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23968925 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 501  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wright, K.P.J.; McHill, A.W.; Birks, B.R.; Griffin, B.R.; Rusterholz, T.; Chinoy, E.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Entrainment of the human circadian clock to the natural light-dark cycle Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 23 Issue (up) 16 Pages 1554-1558  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; Circadian Clocks/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; *Lighting; Male; *Photoperiod; *Sunlight; Young Adult; Circadian Rhythm  
  Abstract The electric light is one of the most important human inventions. Sleep and other daily rhythms in physiology and behavior, however, evolved in the natural light-dark cycle [1], and electrical lighting is thought to have disrupted these rhythms. Yet how much the age of electrical lighting has altered the human circadian clock is unknown. Here we show that electrical lighting and the constructed environment is associated with reduced exposure to sunlight during the day, increased light exposure after sunset, and a delayed timing of the circadian clock as compared to a summer natural 14 hr 40 min:9 hr 20 min light-dark cycle camping. Furthermore, we find that after exposure to only natural light, the internal circadian clock synchronizes to solar time such that the beginning of the internal biological night occurs at sunset and the end of the internal biological night occurs before wake time just after sunrise. In addition, we find that later chronotypes show larger circadian advances when exposed to only natural light, making the timing of their internal clocks in relation to the light-dark cycle more similar to earlier chronotypes. These findings have important implications for understanding how modern light exposure patterns contribute to late sleep schedules and may disrupt sleep and circadian clocks.  
  Address Sleep and Chronobiology Laboratory, Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309-0354, USA. kenneth.wright@colorado.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23910656; PMCID:PMC4020279 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 505  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: