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Author Li, M.-D.; Li, C.-M.; Wang, Z. url  openurl
  Title The Role of Circadian Clocks in Metabolic Disease Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication (down) Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 85 Issue 3 Pages 387–401  
  Keywords Animals; circadian clocks; metabolism; metabolic disease  
  Abstract The circadian clock is a highly conserved timing system, resonating physiological processes to 24-hour environmental cycles. Circadian misalignment is emerging as a risk factor of metabolic disease. The molecular clock resides in all metabolic tissues, the dysfunction of which is associated with perturbed energy metabolism. In this article, we will review current knowledge about molecular mechanisms of the circadian clock and the role of clocks in the physiology and pathophysiology of metabolic tissues.  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 392  
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Author Sahar, S.; Sassone-Corsi, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Regulation of metabolism: the circadian clock dictates the time Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication (down) Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism: TEM Abbreviated Journal Trends Endocrinol Metab  
  Volume 23 Issue 1 Pages 1-8  
  Keywords Animals; Chronobiology Disorders/metabolism; *Circadian Clocks; *Circadian Rhythm; Circadian Rhythm Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism; *Energy Metabolism; Humans; Metabolome  
  Abstract Circadian rhythms occur with a periodicity of approximately 24h and regulate a wide array of metabolic and physiologic functions. Accumulating epidemiological and genetic evidence indicates that disruption of circadian rhythms can be directly linked to many pathological conditions, including sleep disorders, depression, metabolic syndrome and cancer. Intriguingly, several molecular gears constituting the clock machinery have been found to establish functional interplays with regulators of cellular metabolism. Although the circadian clock regulates multiple metabolic pathways, metabolite availability and feeding behavior can in turn regulate the circadian clock. An in-depth understanding of this reciprocal regulation of circadian rhythms and cellular metabolism may provide insights into the development of therapeutic intervention against specific metabolic disorders.  
  Address Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism, School of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1043-2760 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:22169754; PMCID:PMC3259741 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 151  
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Author Revell, V.L.; Molina, T.A.; Eastman, C.I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Human phase response curve to intermittent blue light using a commercially available device Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication (down) The Journal of Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Physiol  
  Volume 590 Issue Pt 19 Pages 4859-4868  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Circadian Clocks/physiology/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/analysis/physiology; Saliva/chemistry; Young Adult; blue light  
  Abstract Light shifts the timing of the circadian clock according to a phase response curve (PRC). To date, all human light PRCs have been to long durations of bright white light. However, melanopsin, the primary photopigment for the circadian system, is most sensitive to short wavelength blue light. Therefore, to optimise light treatment it is important to generate a blue light PRC.We used a small, commercially available blue LED light box, screen size 11.2 x 6.6 cm at approximately 50 cm, approximately 200 muW cm(-2), approximately 185 lux. Subjects participated in two 5 day laboratory sessions 1 week apart. Each session consisted of circadian phase assessments to obtain melatonin profiles before and after 3 days of free-running through an ultradian light-dark cycle (2.5 h wake in dim light, 1.5 h sleep in the dark), forced desynchrony protocol. During one session subjects received intermittent blue light (three 30 min pulses over 2 h) once a day for the 3 days of free-running, and in the other session (control) they remained in dim room light, counterbalanced. The time of blue light was varied among subjects to cover the entire 24 h day. For each individual, the phase shift to blue light was corrected for the free-run determined during the control session. The blue light PRC had a broad advance region starting in the morning and extending through the afternoon. The delay region started a few hours before bedtime and extended through the night. This is the first PRC to be constructed to blue light and to a stimulus that could be used in the real world.  
  Address University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-3751 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22753544; PMCID:PMC3487041 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 345  
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Author Dominoni, D.M.; Helm, B.; Lehmann, M.; Dowse, H.B.; Partecke, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Clocks for the city: circadian differences between forest and city songbirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication (down) Proceedings. Biological Sciences / The Royal Society Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci  
  Volume 280 Issue 1763 Pages 20130593  
  Keywords Animals; Circadian Clocks/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm; Cities; *Ecosystem; Light; Male; Songbirds/classification/*physiology; Trees; Urbanization; birds; chronotype; circadian rhythms; light at night; radio-telemetry; urbanization  
  Abstract To keep pace with progressing urbanization organisms must cope with extensive habitat change. Anthropogenic light and noise have modified differences between day and night, and may thereby interfere with circadian clocks. Urbanized species, such as birds, are known to advance their activity to early morning and night hours. We hypothesized that such modified activity patterns are reflected by properties of the endogenous circadian clock. Using automatic radio-telemetry, we tested this idea by comparing activity patterns of free-living forest and city European blackbirds (Turdus merula). We then recaptured the same individuals and recorded their activity under constant conditions. City birds started their activity earlier and had faster but less robust circadian oscillation of locomotor activity than forest conspecifics. Circadian period length predicted start of activity in the field, and this relationship was mainly explained by fast-paced and early-rising city birds. Although based on only two populations, our findings point to links between city life, chronotype and circadian phenotype in songbirds, and potentially in other organisms that colonize urban habitats, and highlight that urban environments can significantly modify biologically important rhythms in wild organisms.  
  Address Department of Migration and Immuno-ecology, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Radolfzell 78479, Germany. ddominoni@orn.mpg.de  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23740778; PMCID:PMC3774226 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 42  
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Author Wahl, F.; Kantermann, T.; Amft, O. url  doi
openurl 
  Title How much Light do you get? Estimating Daily Light Exposure using Smartphones Type Conference Article
  Year 2014 Publication (down) Proceedings of the 2014 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers Abbreviated Journal Proc. of the 2014 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers  
  Volume n/a Issue n/a Pages 43-46  
  Keywords Instrumentation; light exposure; context inference, light intensity; light intake; circadian clock; circadian rhythm; mobile sensing  
  Abstract We present an approach to estimate a persons light exposure using smartphones. We used web-sourced weather reports combined with smartphone light sensor data, time of day, and indoor/outdoor information, to estimate illuminance around the user throughout a day. Since light dominates every human’s circadian rhythm and influences the sleep-wake cycle, we developed a smartphone-based system that does not re- quire additional sensors for illuminance estimation. To evaluate our approach, we conducted a free-living study with 12 users, each carrying a smartphone, a head-mounted light reference sensor, and a wrist-worn light sensing device for six consecutive days. Estimated light values were compared to the head-mounted reference, the wrist-worn device and a mean value estimate. Our results show that illuminance could be estimated at less than 20% error for all study participants, outperforming the wrist-worn device. In 9 out of 12 participants the estimation deviated less than 10% from the reference measurements.  
  Address ACTLab, Chair of Sensor Technology, University of Passau (florian.wahl@uni-passau.de)  
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  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1206  
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