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Author Stevens, R.G.; Brainard, G.C.; Blask, D.E.; Lockley, S.W.; Motta, M.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Breast cancer and circadian disruption from electric lighting in the modern world Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication CA: a Cancer Journal for Clinicians Abbreviated Journal CA Cancer J Clin  
  Volume 64 Issue 3 Pages 207-218  
  Keywords breast neoplasms; circadian clock; melatonin production; shift work; sleep duration; oncogenesis  
  Abstract Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide, and there is only a limited explanation of why. Risk is highest in the most industrialized countries but also is rising rapidly in the developing world. Known risk factors account for only a portion of the incidence in the high-risk populations, and there has been considerable speculation and many false leads on other possibly major determinants of risk, such as dietary fat. A hallmark of industrialization is the increasing use of electricity to light the night, both within the home and without. It has only recently become clear that this evolutionarily new and, thereby, unnatural exposure can disrupt human circadian rhythmicity, of which three salient features are melatonin production, sleep, and the circadian clock. A convergence of research in cells, rodents, and humans suggests that the health consequences of circadian disruption may be substantial. An innovative experimental model has shown that light at night markedly increases the growth of human breast cancer xenografts in rats. In humans, the theory that light exposure at night increases breast cancer risk leads to specific predictions that are being tested epidemiologically: evidence has accumulated on risk in shift workers, risk in blind women, and the impact of sleep duration on risk. If electric light at night does explain a portion of the breast cancer burden, then there are practical interventions that can be implemented, including more selective use of light and the adoption of recent advances in lighting technology and application. CA Cancer J Clin 2014;64:207-218. ((c)) 2013 American Cancer Society.  
  Address Professor, Department of Community Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-9235 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24604162; PMCID:PMC4038658 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 155  
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Author Kantermann, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Circadian biology: sleep-styles shaped by light-styles Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 23 Issue 16 Pages R689-90  
  Keywords Human Health; Circadian Clocks/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; *Lighting; Male; *Photoperiod; *Sunlight  
  Abstract Light and darkness are the main time cues synchronising all biological clocks to the external environment. This little understood evolutionary phenomenon is called circadian entrainment. A new study illuminates our understanding of how modern light- and lifestyles compromise circadian entrainment and impact our biological clocks.  
  Address Chronobiology – Centre for Behaviour and Neurosciences, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 7, 9747 AG Groningen, The Netherlands. thomas@kantermann.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23968925 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 501  
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Author Lahti, T.; Merikanto, I.; Partonen, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Circadian clock disruptions and the risk of cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Annals of Medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Med  
  Volume 44 Issue 8 Pages 847-853  
  Keywords Human Health; Cell Division; Chronobiology Disorders/*complications/genetics/*physiopathology; Circadian Clocks/*genetics; Humans; Neoplasms/*etiology; Work Schedule Tolerance/physiology  
  Abstract Disrupted circadian rhythms may lead to failures in the control of the cell division cycle and the subsequent malignant cell growth. In order to understand the pathogenesis of cancer more in detail, it is crucial to identify those mechanisms of action which contribute to the loss of control of the cell division cycle. This mini-review focuses on the recent findings concerning the links between the human circadian clock and cancer. Clinical implications concern not only feasible methods for the assessment of the circadian time of an individual or for the determination of the best time for administration of a drug of treatment, but also in the future genetic tests for screening and for planning treatment.  
  Address Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0785-3890 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23072403 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 513  
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Author Oliveira, A.G.; Stevani, C.V.; Waldenmaier, H.E.; Viviani, V.; Emerson, J.M.; Loros, J.J.; Dunlap, J.C. url  openurl
  Title (up) Circadian Control Sheds Light on Fungal Bioluminescence Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Current Biology Abbreviated Journal Curr. Biol.  
  Volume 25 Issue 7 Pages R283-R285  
  Keywords Animals; bioluminescence; fungi; Agaricales; NADH; NADPH; Neonothopanus gardneri; *Circadian Clocks; luciferase; reductase; biology; luciferin; coleopterans; hemipterans; dipterans; hymenopterans; ecology  
  Abstract Bioluminescence, the creation and emission of light by organisms, affords insight into the lives of organisms doing it. Luminous living things are widespread and access diverse mechanisms to generate and control luminescence. Among the least studied bioluminescent organisms are phylogenetically rare fungi—only 71 species, all within the ∼9,000 fungi of the temperate and tropical Agaricales order—are reported from among ∼100,000 described fungal species. All require oxygen and energy (NADH or NADPH) for bioluminescence and are reported to emit green light (λmax 530 nm) continuously, implying a metabolic function for bioluminescence, perhaps as a byproduct of oxidative metabolism in lignin degradation. Here, however, we report that bioluminescence from the mycelium of Neonothopanus gardneri is controlled by a temperature-compensated circadian clock, the result of cycles in content/activity of the luciferase, reductase, and luciferin that comprise the luminescent system. Because regulation implies an adaptive function for bioluminescence, a controversial question for more than two millennia, we examined interactions between luminescent fungi and insects. Prosthetic acrylic resin “mushrooms,” internally illuminated by a green LED emitting light similar to the bioluminescence, attract staphilinid rove beetles (coleopterans), as well as hemipterans (true bugs), dipterans (flies), and hymenopterans (wasps and ants), at numbers far greater than dark control traps. Thus, circadian control may optimize energy use for when bioluminescence is most visible, attracting insects that can in turn help in spore dispersal, thereby benefitting fungi growing under the forest canopy, where wind flow is greatly reduced.  
  Address Departamento de Oceanografia Física, Química, e Geológica, Instituto Oceanográfico, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP 05508-120, Brazil  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1141  
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Author Savvidis, C.; Koutsilieris, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Circadian rhythm disruption in cancer biology Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Molecular Medicine (Cambridge, Mass.) Abbreviated Journal Mol Med  
  Volume 18 Issue Pages 1249-1260  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; CLOCK Proteins/genetics/metabolism; Circadian Clocks/genetics; *Circadian Rhythm/genetics; Environment; Humans; Melatonin/metabolism; Neoplasms/genetics/pathology/*physiopathology/therapy  
  Abstract Circadian rhythms show universally a 24-h oscillation pattern in metabolic, physiological and behavioral functions of almost all species. This pattern is due to a fundamental adaptation to the rotation of Earth around its own axis. Molecular mechanisms of generation of circadian rhythms organize a biochemical network in suprachiasmatic nucleus and peripheral tissues, building cell autonomous clock pacemakers. Rhythmicity is observed in transcriptional expression of a wide range of clock-controlled genes that regulate a variety of normal cell functions, such as cell division and proliferation. Desynchrony of this rhythmicity seems to be implicated in several pathologic conditions, including tumorigenesis and progression of cancer. In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) categorized “shiftwork that involves circadian disruption [as] probably carcinogenic to humans” (Group 2A in the IARC classification system of carcinogenic potency of an agentagent) (Painting, Firefighting, and Shiftwork; IARC; 2007). This review discusses the potential relation between disruptions of normal circadian rhythms with genetic driving machinery of cancer. Elucidation of the role of clockwork disruption, such as exposure to light at night and sleep disruption, in cancer biology could be important in developing new targeted anticancer therapies, optimizing individualized chronotherapy and modifying lighting environment in workplaces or homes.  
  Address Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hippocration General Hospital, Athens, Greece. csavvidis@med.uoa.gr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1076-1551 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22811066; PMCID:PMC3521792 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 514  
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