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Author Arnaud Da Silva, Jelmer M. Samplonius, Emmi Schlicht, Mihai Valcu, Bart Kempenaers url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial night lighting rather than traffic noise affects the daily timing of dawn and dusk singing in common European songbirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Behavioral Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 25 Issue 5 Pages 1037-1047  
  Keywords animal, birds, dawn chorus, dusk chorus, light intensity, light pollution, noise pollution, seasonality, songbird, weather  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1105  
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Author Da Silva, A.; Valcu, M.; Kempenaers, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution alters the phenology of dawn and dusk singing in common European songbirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci  
  Volume 2015 Issue Pages 20140126  
  Keywords Animals; birds; artificial light at night; seasonality; song production; dawn chorus; dusk chorus; weather; European robin; Erithacus rubecula; common blackbird; song thrush; Turdus philomelos; great tit; Parus major; blue tit; common chaffinch; Fringilla coelebs  
  Abstract Artificial night lighting is expanding globally, but its ecological consequences remain little understood. Animals often use changes in day length as a cue to time seasonal behaviour. Artificial night lighting may influence the perception of day length, and may thus affect both circadian and circannual rhythms. Over a 3.5 month period, from winter to breeding, we recorded daily singing activity of six common songbird species in 12 woodland sites, half of which were affected by street lighting. We previously reported on analyses suggesting that artificial night lighting affects the daily timing of singing in five species. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether the presence of artificial night lighting is also associated with the seasonal occurrence of dawn and dusk singing. We found that in four species dawn and dusk singing developed earlier in the year at sites exposed to light pollution. We also examined the effects of weather conditions and found that rain and low temperatures negatively affected the occurrence of dawn and dusk singing. Our results support the hypothesis that artificial night lighting alters natural seasonal rhythms, independently of other effects of urbanization. The fitness consequences of the observed changes in seasonal timing of behaviour remain unknown.  
  Address Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard-Gwinner-Strasse, 82319 Seewiesen, Germany; b.kempenaers@orn.mpg.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title The biological impacts of artificial light at night: from molecules to communities Abbreviated Series Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1124  
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Author Hasan, N.M. openurl 
  Title Comparison of the onset of dawn chorus of bulbuls and house sparrows in two different geographical locations: effect of climate, noise and light pollution. Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Research Opinions in Animal & Veterinary Sciences Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 1 Issue 4 Pages 220-225  
  Keywords Animals; bulbul; Pycnonotidae; house sparrow; Passer domesticus; Tulkarem; Ar-Rayyan; Palestinian Authority; Riyadh; Saudi Arabia; dawn chorus; urbanization  
  Abstract The onset of dawn chorus was studied for a period of fourteen months for bulbuls (Pycnonotidae) and house sparrows (Passer domesticus) in two different geographical locations. One is very quiet and semi lit place in the suburbs of the small Mediterranean city of Tulkarem/Palestinian Authority. The other location is comparatively noisy and very well lit place in the Ar-Rayyan urban district of the city of Riyadh/ Saudi Arabia where desert climate prevails. This study is the first of its kind and clearly shows that the timing of dawn chorus is similar for

autumn and winter seasons in both locations but major differences were observed from February until September between the two locations. It can be concluded that very early timing of dawn chorus during spring / summer for the Riyadh location cannot only be attributed to breeding season and is temperature dependent (strong positive correlation, r>0.6). The similarities for autumn and early winter between the two locations is very interesting in that it is not in agreement with the notion that big cities (urbanization) influence the timing of dawn chorus due to noise and light pollution. This emphasizes that dawn chorus is a complex process and that change in the onset and pattern of dawn chorus can not merely be attributed to one variable such as noise or light pollution alone.
 
  Address Department of Basic sciences, College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdel Aziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh 11426, Saudi Arabia  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 2221-1896 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 397  
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Author Miller, M.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Apparent Effects of Light Pollution on Singing Behavior of American Robins Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication The Condor Abbreviated Journal Condor  
  Volume 108 Issue 1 Pages 130  
  Keywords American Robin; birds; light pollution; morning chorus; dawn chorus; song; Turdus migratorius; animals; communication  
  Abstract Astronomers consider light pollution to be a growing problem, however few studies have addressed potential effects of light pollution on wildlife. Sunlight is believed to initiate song in many bird species. If light initiates song, then light pollution may be influencing avian song behavior at a population level. This hypothesis predicts that birds breeding in areas with large amounts of artificial light will begin singing earlier in the day than birds in areas with little artificial light. Birds in highly illuminated areas might begin singing earlier than did birds in those same areas in previous years when artificial light levels were known to be, or were presumably, lower. Also, birds should begin singing earlier within a site on brightly lit nights. In 2002 and 2003 I documented initiation of morning song by breeding American Robins (Turdus migratorius) in areas with differing intensity of artificial nocturnal light. I compared my observations among sites and against historical studies. Robin populations in areas with large amounts of artificial light frequently began their morning chorus during true night. Chorus initiation time, relative to civil twilight, was positively correlated with amount of artificial light present during true night. Robin choruses in areas with little, or presumably little, artificial light have almost never begun during true night, instead appearing to track the onset of civil twilight. Proliferation of artificial nocturnal light may be strongly affecting singing behavior of American Robins at a population level.  
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  ISSN 0010-5422 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 39  
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Author Nordt, A.; Klenke, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sleepless in town--drivers of the temporal shift in dawn song in urban European blackbirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 8 Issue 8 Pages e71476  
  Keywords Animals; Automobiles; Cities; Ecosystem; Germany; Humans; Light; Male; Noise; Photoperiod; Sleep; Songbirds/*physiology; Urban Population; *Vocalization, Animal; dawn chorus; morning chorus  
  Abstract Organisms living in urban environments are exposed to different environmental conditions compared to their rural conspecifics. Especially anthropogenic noise and artificial night light are closely linked to urbanization and pose new challenges to urban species. Songbirds are particularly affected by these factors, because they rely on the spread of acoustic information and adjust their behaviour to the rhythm of night and day, e.g. time their dawn song according to changing light intensities. Our aim was to clarify the specific contributions of artificial night light and traffic noise on the timing of dawn song of urban European Blackbirds (Turdus merula). We investigated the onset of blackbird dawn song along a steep urban gradient ranging from an urban forest to the city centre of Leipzig, Germany. This gradient of anthropogenic noise and artificial night light was reflected in the timing of dawn song. In the city centre, blackbirds started their dawn song up to 5 hours earlier compared to those in semi-natural habitats. We found traffic noise to be the driving factor of the shift of dawn song into true night, although it was not completely separable from the effects of ambient night light. We additionally included meteorological conditions into the analysis and found an effect on the song onset. Cloudy and cold weather delayed the onset, but cloud cover was assumed to reflect night light emissions, thus, amplified sky luminance and increased the effect of artificial night light. Beside these temporal effects, we also found differences in the spatial autocorrelation of dawn song onset showing a much higher variability in noisy city areas than in rural parks and forests. These findings indicate that urban hazards such as ambient noise and light pollution show a manifold interference with naturally evolved cycles and have significant effects on the activity patterns of urban blackbirds.  
  Address Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Department of Conservation Biology, Leipzig, Germany. anja.nordt@ufz.de  
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  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:23940759; PMCID:PMC3737108 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 43  
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