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Author Verma, A.K.; Singh, S.; Rizvi, S.I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Age-dependent altered redox homeostasis in the chronodisrupted rat model and moderation by melatonin administration Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Aging; artificial light-at-night; circadian disruption; melatonin; oxidative stress  
  Abstract Circadian disruption or chronodisruption (CD) occurs when day-night cycles and other internal rhythms are not adjusted to environmental light-dark regimens and are unable to synchronize among each other. Artificial light-induced oxidative stress is a major concern as the circadian physiology of the cell is chronically altered due to suppression of the time-keeping hormone, melatonin. The relationship between age-related impaired redox status and disrupted circadian rhythms is still not fully understood. The present study evaluated the effect of artificial light at night (ALAN) with respect to aging and role of melatonin supplementation. This study was conducted on young (3 months) and old (24 months) male Wistar rats subdivided into four groups control (C), melatonin treated (MLT), artificial light at night (ALAN), and ALAN+MLT group. Pronounced changes were observed in the old compared to the young rats. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), plasma membrane redox system (PMRS), protein carbonyl (PCO), and sialic acid (SA) were significantly (p </= 0.05) increased, while ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were significantly (p </= 0.05) suppressed in light-exposed young and old animals compared to their age-matched controls. Advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) increased non-significantly in young rats of the ALAN group; however, significant (p </= 0.05) changes were observed in the old rats of the ALAN group compared to their respective controls. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) increased and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity decreased, significantly (p </= 0.05) in young animals of the ALAN group, while nonsignificant changes of both parameters were recorded in the old animals of the ALAN groups compared with their age-matched controls. Melatonin supplementation resulted in maintenance of the normal redox homeostasis in both young and old animal groups. Our study suggests that aged rats are more susceptible to altered photoperiod as their circadian redox homeostasis is under stress subsequent to ALAN. Melatonin supplementation could be a promising means of alleviating age-related circadian disturbances, especially in light-polluted areas.  
  Address Department of Biochemistry, University of Allahabad , Allahabad, India  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32731777 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3067  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Vetter, C.; Juda, M.; Lang, D.; Wojtysiak, A.; Roenneberg, T. url  openurl
  Title Blue-enriched office light competes with natural light as a zeitgeber Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Work Environ Health  
  Volume 37 Issue 5 Pages 437-445  
  Keywords *Circadian Rhythm; *Color; Humans; *Lighting; *Occupational Health; Sleep; Wakefulness; blue light; circadian disruption; Circadian rhythm; sleep  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Circadian regulation of human physiology and behavior (eg, body temperature or sleep-timing), depends on the “zeitgeber” light that synchronizes them to the 24-hour day. This study investigated the effect of changing light temperature at the workplace from 4000 Kelvin (K) to 8000 K on sleep-wake and activity-rest behavior. METHODS: An experimental group (N=27) that experienced the light change was compared with a non-intervention group (N=27) that remained in the 4000 K environment throughout the 5-week study period (14 January to 17 February). Sleep logs and actimetry continuously assessed sleep-wake behavior and activity patterns. RESULTS: Over the study period, the timing of sleep and activity on free days steadily advanced parallel to the seasonal progression of sunrise in the non-intervention group. In contrast, the temporal pattern of sleep and activity in the experimental group remained associated with the constant onset of work. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that artificial blue-enriched light competes with natural light as a zeitgeber. While subjects working under the warmer light (4000 K) appear to entrain (or synchronize) to natural dawn, the subjects who were exposed to blue-enriched (8000 K) light appear to entrain to office hours. The results confirm that light is the dominant zeitgeber for the human clock and that its efficacy depends on spectral composition. The results also indicate that blue-enriched artificial light is a potent zeitgeber that has to be used with diligence.  
  Address Institute for Medical Psychology, Centre of Chronobiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat, Munich, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0355-3140 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21246176 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 350  
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Author Walmsley, L.; Hanna, L.; Mouland, J.; Martial, F.; West, A.; Smedley, A.R.; Bechtold, D.A.; Webb, A.R.; Lucas, R.J.; Brown, T.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Colour As a Signal for Entraining the Mammalian Circadian Clock Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication PLoS Biology Abbreviated Journal PLoS Biol  
  Volume 13 Issue 4 Pages e1002127  
  Keywords Animals; biology; color; circadian disruption; animal models; mouse models; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus; Photoperiod; twilight  
  Abstract Twilight is characterised by changes in both quantity (“irradiance”) and quality (“colour”) of light. Animals use the variation in irradiance to adjust their internal circadian clocks, aligning their behaviour and physiology with the solar cycle. However, it is currently unknown whether changes in colour also contribute to this entrainment process. Using environmental measurements, we show here that mammalian blue-yellow colour discrimination provides a more reliable method of tracking twilight progression than simply measuring irradiance. We next use electrophysiological recordings to demonstrate that neurons in the mouse suprachiasmatic circadian clock display the cone-dependent spectral opponency required to make use of this information. Thus, our data show that some clock neurons are highly sensitive to changes in spectral composition occurring over twilight and that this input dictates their response to changes in irradiance. Finally, using mice housed under photoperiods with simulated dawn/dusk transitions, we confirm that spectral changes occurring during twilight are required for appropriate circadian alignment under natural conditions. Together, these data reveal a new sensory mechanism for telling time of day that would be available to any mammalian species capable of chromatic vision.  
  Address Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher PLOS Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1544-9173 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25884537 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1152  
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Author Xiao, Q.; Gee, G.; Jones, R.R.; Jia, P.; James, P.; Hale, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cross-sectional association between outdoor artificial light at night and sleep duration in middle-to-older aged adults: The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res  
  Volume 180 Issue Pages 108823  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health; Artificial light at night; Circadian disruption; Neighborhood; Sleep; Socioeconomic disadvantage  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Artificial light at night (ALAN) can disrupt circadian rhythms and cause sleep disturbances. Several previous epidemiological studies have reported an association between higher levels of outdoor ALAN and shorter sleep duration. However, it remains unclear how this association may differ by individual- and neighborhood-level socioeconomic status, and whether ALAN may also be associated with longer sleep duration. METHODS: We assessed the cross-sectional relationship between outdoor ALAN and self-reported sleep duration in 333,365 middle- to older-aged men and women in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Study participants reported baseline addresses, which were geocoded and linked with outdoor ALAN exposure measured by satellite imagery data obtained from the U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System. We used multinomial logistic regression to estimate the multinomial odds ratio (MOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the likelihood of reporting very short (<5h), short (<7h) and long (>/=9h) sleep relative to reporting 7-8h of sleep across quintiles of LAN. We also conducted subgroup analyses by individual-level education and census tract-level poverty levels. RESULTS: We found that higher levels of ALAN were associated with both very short and short sleep. When compared to the lowest quintile, the highest quintile of ALAN was associated with 16% and 25% increases in the likelihood of reporting short sleep in women (MORQ1 vs Q5, (95% CI), 1.16 (1.10, 1.22)) and men (1.25 (1.19, 1.31)), respectively. Moreover, we found that higher ALAN was associated with a decrease in the likelihood of reporting long sleep in men (0.79 (0.71, 0.89)). We also found that the associations between ALAN and short sleep were larger in neighborhoods with higher levels of poverty. CONCLUSIONS: The burden of short sleep may be higher among residents in areas with higher levels of outdoor LAN, and this association is likely stronger in poorer neighborhoods. Future studies should investigate the potential benefits of reducing light intensity in high ALAN areas in improve sleep health.  
  Address Program in Public Health, Department of Family, Population, and Preventive Medicine, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31627155 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2702  
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Author Xiao, Q.; James, P.; Breheny, P.; Jia, P.; Park, Y.; Zhang, D.; Fisher, J.A.; Ward, M.H.; Jones, R.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Outdoor light at night and postmenopausal breast cancer risk in the NIH-AARP diet and health study Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Int J Cancer  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; circadian disruption; outdoor light at night; postmenopausal breast cancer; prospective cohort  
  Abstract Circadian disruption may play a role in breast carcinogenesis. Previous studies reported relationships between outdoor light at night (LAN) and the breast cancer risk, but their findings are mixed. There is also a need to examine LAN and breast cancer incidence according to different individual and environmental characteristics to identify subpopulations at greater risk associated with LAN exposure. We studied residential outdoor LAN estimated from satellite imagery at baseline (1996) in relation to postmenopausal breast cancer incidence over ~16 years of follow-up in 186 981 postmenopausal women including 12 318 incident postmenopausal breast cancer cases in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and two-sided 95% confidence intervals (CI) of the relationship between quintiles of LAN and postmenopausal breast cancer risk, overall and by hormone receptor status and cancer stage. We found that when compared to women in the lowest quintile of baseline LAN, those in the highest quintile had a 10% increase in postmenopausal breast cancer risk (HR (95% CI), 1.10 (1.02, 1.18), P-trend, .002). The association appeared to be stronger for estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer (1.12 [1.02, 1.24], .007) than for ER-negative cancer (1.07 [0.85, 1.34], .66). Our findings also suggested that the relationship between LAN and breast cancer risk may differ by individual characteristics, such as smoking, alcohol drinking, sleep duration and BMI, and neighborhood environment. In conclusion, our study suggests that higher outdoor LAN exposure may be a risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer.  
  Address Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0020-7136 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32488897 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2976  
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