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Author Dauchy, R.T.; Xiang, S.; Mao, L.; Brimer, S.; Wren, M.A.; Yuan, L.; Anbalagan, M.; Hauch, A.; Frasch, T.; Rowan, B.G.; Blask, D.E.; Hill, S.M.
Title Circadian and melatonin disruption by exposure to light at night drives intrinsic resistance to tamoxifen therapy in breast cancer Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Cancer Research Abbreviated Journal Cancer Res
Volume 74 Issue 15 Pages 4099-4110
Keywords (up) *Cancer; breast cancer; melatonin; endocrinology; tamoxifen; *Circadian Rhythm; circadian disruption; human health; epidemiology
Abstract Resistance to endocrine therapy is a major impediment to successful treatment of breast cancer. Preclinical and clinical evidence links resistance to antiestrogen drugs in breast cancer cells with the overexpression and/or activation of various pro-oncogenic tyrosine kinases. Disruption of circadian rhythms by night shift work or disturbed sleep-wake cycles may lead to an increased risk of breast cancer and other diseases. Moreover, light exposure at night (LEN) suppresses the nocturnal production of melatonin that inhibits breast cancer growth. In this study, we used a rat model of estrogen receptor (ERalpha(+)) MCF-7 tumor xenografts to demonstrate how altering light/dark cycles with dim LEN (dLEN) speed the development of breast tumors, increasing their metabolism and growth and conferring an intrinsic resistance to tamoxifen therapy. These characteristics were not observed in animals in which the circadian melatonin rhythm was not disrupted, or in animals subjected to dLEN if they received nocturnal melatonin replacement. Strikingly, our results also showed that melatonin acted both as a tumor metabolic inhibitor and a circadian-regulated kinase inhibitor to reestablish the sensitivity of breast tumors to tamoxifen and tumor regression. Together, our findings show how dLEN-mediated disturbances in nocturnal melatonin production can render tumors insensitive to tamoxifen. Cancer Res; 74(15); 4099-110. (c)2014 AACR.
Address Departments of Structural and Cellular Biology and Tulane Cancer Center and Louisiana Cancer Research Consortium; Tulane Circadian Cancer Biology Group; and
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0008-5472 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:25062775; PMCID:PMC4119539 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 355
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Author Vetter, C.; Juda, M.; Lang, D.; Wojtysiak, A.; Roenneberg, T.
Title Blue-enriched office light competes with natural light as a zeitgeber Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Work Environ Health
Volume 37 Issue 5 Pages 437-445
Keywords (up) *Circadian Rhythm; *Color; Humans; *Lighting; *Occupational Health; Sleep; Wakefulness; blue light; circadian disruption; Circadian rhythm; sleep
Abstract OBJECTIVES: Circadian regulation of human physiology and behavior (eg, body temperature or sleep-timing), depends on the “zeitgeber” light that synchronizes them to the 24-hour day. This study investigated the effect of changing light temperature at the workplace from 4000 Kelvin (K) to 8000 K on sleep-wake and activity-rest behavior. METHODS: An experimental group (N=27) that experienced the light change was compared with a non-intervention group (N=27) that remained in the 4000 K environment throughout the 5-week study period (14 January to 17 February). Sleep logs and actimetry continuously assessed sleep-wake behavior and activity patterns. RESULTS: Over the study period, the timing of sleep and activity on free days steadily advanced parallel to the seasonal progression of sunrise in the non-intervention group. In contrast, the temporal pattern of sleep and activity in the experimental group remained associated with the constant onset of work. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that artificial blue-enriched light competes with natural light as a zeitgeber. While subjects working under the warmer light (4000 K) appear to entrain (or synchronize) to natural dawn, the subjects who were exposed to blue-enriched (8000 K) light appear to entrain to office hours. The results confirm that light is the dominant zeitgeber for the human clock and that its efficacy depends on spectral composition. The results also indicate that blue-enriched artificial light is a potent zeitgeber that has to be used with diligence.
Address Institute for Medical Psychology, Centre of Chronobiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat, Munich, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0355-3140 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21246176 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 350
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Author Landgraf, D.; McCarthy, M.J.; Welsh, D.K.
Title The role of the circadian clock in animal models of mood disorders Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Behavioral Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Behav Neurosci
Volume 128 Issue 3 Pages 344-359
Keywords (up) *Circadian Rhythm; mood; mood disorders; circadian disruption
Abstract An association between circadian clock function and mood regulation is well established and has been proposed as a factor in the development of mood disorders. Patients with depression or mania suffer disturbed sleep-wake cycles and altered rhythms in daily activities. Environmentally disrupted circadian rhythms increase the risk of mood disorders in the general population. However, proof that a disturbance of circadian rhythms is causally involved in the development of psychiatric disorders remains elusive. Using clock gene mutants, manipulations of sleep-wake and light-dark cycles, and brain lesions affecting clock function, animal models have been developed to investigate whether circadian rhythm disruptions alter mood. In this review, selected animal models are examined to address the issue of causality between circadian rhythms and affective behavior.
Address Research Service, Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0735-7044 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24660657 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 316
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Author Rakshit, K.; Thomas, A.P.; Matveyenko, A.V.
Title Does disruption of circadian rhythms contribute to beta-cell failure in type 2 diabetes? Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Current Diabetes Reports Abbreviated Journal Curr Diab Rep
Volume 14 Issue 4 Pages 474
Keywords (up) *epidemiology; diabetes; Type 2 diabetes; beta cell; T2DM; artificial light; light exposure; circadian disruption
Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a complex metabolic disease characterized by the loss of beta-cell secretory function and mass. The pathophysiology of beta-cell failure in T2DM involves a complex interaction between genetic susceptibilities and environmental risk factors. One environmental condition that is gaining greater appreciation as a risk factor for T2DM is the disruption of circadian rhythms (eg, shift-work and sleep loss). In recent years, circadian disruption has become increasingly prevalent in modern societies and consistently shown to augment T2DM susceptibility (partly mediated through its effects on pancreatic beta-cells). Since beta-cell failure is essential for development of T2DM, we will review current work from epidemiologic, clinical, and animal studies designed to gain insights into the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying the predisposition to beta-cell failure associated with circadian disruption. Elucidating the role of circadian clocks in regulating beta-cell health will add to our understanding of T2DM pathophysiology and may contribute to the development of novel therapeutic and preventative approaches.
Address Larry L. Hillblom Islet Research Center, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, University of California Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, 900A Weyburn Place, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1534-4827 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24532160; PMCID:PMC3988110 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 320
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Author Cajochen, C.; Frey, S.; Anders, D.; Spati, J.; Bues, M.; Pross, A.; Mager, R.; Wirz-Justice, A.; Stefani, O.
Title Evening exposure to a light-emitting diodes (LED)-backlit computer screen affects circadian physiology and cognitive performance Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) Abbreviated Journal J Appl Physiol (1985)
Volume 110 Issue 5 Pages 1432-1438
Keywords (up) Adult; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology/radiation effects; Cognition/*physiology/radiation effects; *Computer Terminals; Humans; Light; Lighting/*methods; Male; Photic Stimulation/*methods; Radiation Dosage; Semiconductors; *Task Performance and Analysis; Young Adult; blue light; sleep; circadian disruption
Abstract Many people spend an increasing amount of time in front of computer screens equipped with light-emitting diodes (LED) with a short wavelength (blue range). Thus we investigated the repercussions on melatonin (a marker of the circadian clock), alertness, and cognitive performance levels in 13 young male volunteers under controlled laboratory conditions in a balanced crossover design. A 5-h evening exposure to a white LED-backlit screen with more than twice as much 464 nm light emission {irradiance of 0,241 Watt/(steradian x m(2)) [W/(sr x m(2))], 2.1 x 10(13) photons/(cm(2) x s), in the wavelength range of 454 and 474 nm} than a white non-LED-backlit screen [irradiance of 0,099 W/(sr x m(2)), 0.7 x 10(13) photons/(cm(2) x s), in the wavelength range of 454 and 474 nm] elicited a significant suppression of the evening rise in endogenous melatonin and subjective as well as objective sleepiness, as indexed by a reduced incidence of slow eye movements and EEG low-frequency activity (1-7 Hz) in frontal brain regions. Concomitantly, sustained attention, as determined by the GO/NOGO task; working memory/attention, as assessed by “explicit timing”; and declarative memory performance in a word-learning paradigm were significantly enhanced in the LED-backlit screen compared with the non-LED condition. Screen quality and visual comfort were rated the same in both screen conditions, whereas the non-LED screen tended to be considered brighter. Our data indicate that the spectral profile of light emitted by computer screens impacts on circadian physiology, alertness, and cognitive performance levels. The challenge will be to design a computer screen with a spectral profile that can be individually programmed to add timed, essential light information to the circadian system in humans.
Address Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospitals of the University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland. christian.cajochen@upkbs.ch
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0161-7567 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21415172 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 293
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