|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Dominoni, D.
Title The effects of light pollution on biological rhythms of birds: an integrated, mechanistic perspective Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2015 Publication Journal of Ornithology Abbreviated Journal J. of Ornith.
Volume 156 Issue 1 Pages 409-418
Keywords Animals; Birds; Light pollution; Circadian rhythms; Annual rhythms; Chronodisruption; Melatonin; Deep brain photoreceptors; ipRGCs
Abstract Light pollution is considered a threat for biodiversity given the extent to which it can affect a vast number of behavioral and physiological processes in several species. This comes as no surprise as light is a fundamental, environmental cue through which organisms time their daily and seasonal activities, and alterations in the light environment have been found to affect profoundly the synchronization of the circadian clock, the endogenous mechanism that tracks and predicts variation in the external light/dark cycles. In this context, birds have been one of the most studied animal taxa, but our understanding of the effects of light pollution on the biological rhythms of avian species is mostly limited to behavioral responses. In order to understand which proximate mechanisms may be affected by artificial lights, we need an integrated perspective that focuses on light as a physiological signal, and especially on how photic information is perceived, decoded, and transmitted through the whole body. The aim of this review is to summarize the effects of light pollution on physiological and biochemical mechanisms that underlie changes in birds’ behavior, highlighting the current gaps in our knowledge and proposing future research avenues.
Address Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK; davide.dominoni@glasgow.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1167
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Smolensky, M.H.; Sackett-Lundeen, L.L.; Portaluppi, F.
Title Nocturnal light pollution and underexposure to daytime sunlight: Complementary mechanisms of circadian disruption and related diseases Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2015 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume Issue Pages 1-20
Keywords Human Health; Artificial light at night; cancer; circadian time structure; development and disruption; melatonin; sleep/wake cycle disturbance; sunlight; vitamin D; vitamin D deficiency; circadian time structure; circadian rhythm; desynchrony
Abstract Routine exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) in work, home, and community settings is linked with increased risk of breast and prostate cancer (BC, PC) in normally sighted women and men, the hypothesized biological rhythm mechanisms being frequent nocturnal melatonin synthesis suppression, circadian time structure (CTS) desynchronization, and sleep/wake cycle disruption with sleep deprivation. ALAN-induced perturbation of the CTS melatonin synchronizer signal is communicated maternally at the very onset of life and after birth via breast or artificial formula feedings. Nighttime use of personal computers, mobile phones, electronic tablets, televisions, and the like – now epidemic in adolescents and adults and highly prevalent in pre-school and school-aged children – is a new source of ALAN. However, ALAN exposure occurs concomitantly with almost complete absence of daytime sunlight, whose blue-violet (446-484 nm lambda) spectrum synchronizes the CTS and whose UV-B (290-315 nm lambda) spectrum stimulates vitamin D synthesis. Under natural conditions and clear skies, day/night and annual cycles of UV-B irradiation drive corresponding periodicities in vitamin D synthesis and numerous bioprocesses regulated by active metabolites augment and strengthen the biological time structure. Vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency are widespread in children and adults in developed and developing countries as a consequence of inadequate sunlight exposure. Past epidemiologic studies have focused either on exposure to too little daytime UV-B or too much ALAN, respectively, on vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency or melatonin suppression in relation to risk of cancer and other, e.g., psychiatric, hypertensive, cardiac, and vascular, so-called, diseases of civilization. The observed elevated incidence of medical conditions the two are alleged to influence through many complementary bioprocesses of cells, tissues, and organs led us to examine effects of the totality of the artificial light environment in which humans reside today. Never have chronobiologic or epidemiologic investigations comprehensively researched the potentially deleterious consequences of the combination of suppressed vitamin D plus melatonin synthesis due to life in today's man-made artificial light environment, which in our opinion is long overdue.
Address c Hypertension Center, S. Anna University Hospital, University of Ferrara , Ferrara , Italy
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26374931 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1271
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Robert, K.A.; Lesku, J.A.; Partecke, J.; Chambers, B.
Title Artificial light at night desynchronizes strictly seasonal reproduction in a wild mammal Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2015 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences / The Royal Society Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci
Volume 282 Issue 1816 Pages
Keywords Animals; Macropus eugenii; anthropogenic disturbance; circadian disruption; light pollution; melatonin; trophic mismatch; ecology; wildlife
Abstract Change in day length is an important cue for reproductive activation in seasonally breeding animals to ensure that the timing of greatest maternal investment (e.g. lactation in mammals) coincides with favourable environmental conditions (e.g. peak productivity). However, artificial light at night has the potential to interfere with the perception of such natural cues. Following a 5-year study on two populations of wild marsupial mammals exposed to different night-time levels of anthropogenic light, we show that light pollution in urban environments masks seasonal changes in ambient light cues, suppressing melatonin levels and delaying births in the tammar wallaby. These results highlight a previously unappreciated relationship linking artificial light at night with induced changes in mammalian reproductive physiology, and the potential for larger-scale impacts at the population level.
Address School of Animal Biology, The University of Western Australia, Perth 6009, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26423847 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1286
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Escofet, J.; Bará, S.
Title Reducing the circadian input from self-luminous devices using hardware filters and software applications Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2015 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Res. & Tech.
Volume 49 Issue 4 Pages 481-496
Keywords Lighting; devices; circadian disruption; screens; self-luminous
Abstract The widespread use of self-luminous devices at nighttime (cell-phones, computers, and tablets) raises some reasonable concerns regarding their effects on human physiology. Light at night is a known circadian disruptor, particularly at short visible wavelengths, and it seems advisable to have practical tools for tailoring the spectral radiance of these displays. We analyse two possible strategies to achieve this goal, using hardware filters or software applications. Overall, software applications seem to offer, at the present time, the best trade-offs for controlling the light spectra emitted by existing devices. We submit that such tools should be included as a standard feature on any self-luminous device and that their default settings should be established according to the best available knowledge on the circadian effects of light.
Address Departament d'Òptica i Optometria, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Terrassa, Catalunya, Spain; salva.bara(at)usc.es
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1315
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cornean, R.E.; Margescu, M.; Simionescu, B.
Title Disruption of the Cyrcadian System and Obesity Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2015 Publication Jurnalul Pediatrului Abbreviated Journal Jurnalul Pediatrului
Volume XVIII Issue Supplement 3 Pages 38-42
Keywords Human Health; sleep deprivation; circadian rhythms; *Chronobiology Disorders; chronodisruption; obesity
Abstract Disruption of the cyrcadian system is a relatively new concept incriminated as being responsible for obesity, cardiovascular involvement, cognitive impairment, premature aging and last but not least, cancer. Because obesity is undoubtedly assimilated today to the medical conditions related to the disruption of the normal chronobiology, this paper presents the pivotal role of chronodisruption in the neuroendocrine control of appetite among these patients.
Address University of Medicine and Pharmacy "Iuliu Hatieganu” Cluj – Napoca, Romania; recornean(as)yahoo.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Romanian Society of Pediatric Surgery Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2065-4855 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1349
Permanent link to this record