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Author Zabiliute, A.; Vaicekauskas, R.; Vitta, P.; Zukauskas, A.
Title Phosphor-converted LEDs with low circadian action for outdoor lighting Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2014 Publication Optics Letters Abbreviated Journal Opt Lett
Volume 39 Issue 3 Pages 563-566
Keywords LED; light emitting diode; phosphor conversion; firelight; circadian disruption
Abstract Dichromatic phosphor-converted (pc) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with low circadian action are proposed for low-luminance photobiologically safe outdoor illumination. The LEDs feature the partial conversion of blue radiation in an orange phosphor with the resulting correlated color temperature in the “firelight” range of 1700-2500 K. The circadian action factor, which is the ratio of the biological efficacy of radiation due to the excitation of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells to the mesopic luminous efficacy of radiation, is considerably lower than that of commercial white pc LEDs. The equivalent general color-rendering index estimated with regard to the reduced color-discrimination ability of human vision at low luminances has appropriate values in between those of common white pc LEDs and high-pressure sodium lamp.
Address Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Saulėtekio al. 9, bldg. III, LT-10222 Vilnius, Lithuania
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0146-9592 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24487866 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 283
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Author LeGates, T.A.; Fernandez, D.C.; Hattar, S.
Title Light as a central modulator of circadian rhythms, sleep and affect Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2014 Publication Nature Reviews. Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Nat Rev Neurosci
Volume 15 Issue 7 Pages 443-454
Keywords Human Health; photobiology; circadian disruption; asynchronization; sleep; mood; Review
Abstract Light has profoundly influenced the evolution of life on earth. As widely appreciated, light enables us to generate images of our environment. However, light – through intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) – also influences behaviours that are essential for our health and quality of life but are independent of image formation. These include the synchronization of the circadian clock to the solar day, tracking of seasonal changes and the regulation of sleep. Irregular light environments lead to problems in circadian rhythms and sleep, which eventually cause mood and learning deficits. Recently, it was found that irregular light can also directly affect mood and learning without producing major disruptions in circadian rhythms and sleep. In this Review, we discuss the indirect and direct influence of light on mood and learning, and provide a model for how light, the circadian clock and sleep interact to influence mood and cognitive functions.
Address 1] Johns Hopkins University, Department of Biology, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA. [2] Johns Hopkins University, Department of Neuroscience, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-003X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24917305 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 299
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Author Landgraf, D.; McCarthy, M.J.; Welsh, D.K.
Title The role of the circadian clock in animal models of mood disorders Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2014 Publication Behavioral Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Behav Neurosci
Volume 128 Issue 3 Pages 344-359
Keywords *Circadian Rhythm; mood; mood disorders; circadian disruption
Abstract An association between circadian clock function and mood regulation is well established and has been proposed as a factor in the development of mood disorders. Patients with depression or mania suffer disturbed sleep-wake cycles and altered rhythms in daily activities. Environmentally disrupted circadian rhythms increase the risk of mood disorders in the general population. However, proof that a disturbance of circadian rhythms is causally involved in the development of psychiatric disorders remains elusive. Using clock gene mutants, manipulations of sleep-wake and light-dark cycles, and brain lesions affecting clock function, animal models have been developed to investigate whether circadian rhythm disruptions alter mood. In this review, selected animal models are examined to address the issue of causality between circadian rhythms and affective behavior.
Address Research Service, Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0735-7044 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24660657 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 316
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Author Rakshit, K.; Thomas, A.P.; Matveyenko, A.V.
Title Does disruption of circadian rhythms contribute to beta-cell failure in type 2 diabetes? Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2014 Publication Current Diabetes Reports Abbreviated Journal Curr Diab Rep
Volume 14 Issue 4 Pages 474
Keywords *epidemiology; diabetes; Type 2 diabetes; beta cell; T2DM; artificial light; light exposure; circadian disruption
Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a complex metabolic disease characterized by the loss of beta-cell secretory function and mass. The pathophysiology of beta-cell failure in T2DM involves a complex interaction between genetic susceptibilities and environmental risk factors. One environmental condition that is gaining greater appreciation as a risk factor for T2DM is the disruption of circadian rhythms (eg, shift-work and sleep loss). In recent years, circadian disruption has become increasingly prevalent in modern societies and consistently shown to augment T2DM susceptibility (partly mediated through its effects on pancreatic beta-cells). Since beta-cell failure is essential for development of T2DM, we will review current work from epidemiologic, clinical, and animal studies designed to gain insights into the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying the predisposition to beta-cell failure associated with circadian disruption. Elucidating the role of circadian clocks in regulating beta-cell health will add to our understanding of T2DM pathophysiology and may contribute to the development of novel therapeutic and preventative approaches.
Address Larry L. Hillblom Islet Research Center, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, University of California Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, 900A Weyburn Place, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1534-4827 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24532160; PMCID:PMC3988110 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 320
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Author Dauchy, R.T.; Xiang, S.; Mao, L.; Brimer, S.; Wren, M.A.; Yuan, L.; Anbalagan, M.; Hauch, A.; Frasch, T.; Rowan, B.G.; Blask, D.E.; Hill, S.M.
Title Circadian and melatonin disruption by exposure to light at night drives intrinsic resistance to tamoxifen therapy in breast cancer Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2014 Publication Cancer Research Abbreviated Journal Cancer Res
Volume 74 Issue 15 Pages 4099-4110
Keywords *Cancer; breast cancer; melatonin; endocrinology; tamoxifen; *Circadian Rhythm; circadian disruption; human health; epidemiology
Abstract Resistance to endocrine therapy is a major impediment to successful treatment of breast cancer. Preclinical and clinical evidence links resistance to antiestrogen drugs in breast cancer cells with the overexpression and/or activation of various pro-oncogenic tyrosine kinases. Disruption of circadian rhythms by night shift work or disturbed sleep-wake cycles may lead to an increased risk of breast cancer and other diseases. Moreover, light exposure at night (LEN) suppresses the nocturnal production of melatonin that inhibits breast cancer growth. In this study, we used a rat model of estrogen receptor (ERalpha(+)) MCF-7 tumor xenografts to demonstrate how altering light/dark cycles with dim LEN (dLEN) speed the development of breast tumors, increasing their metabolism and growth and conferring an intrinsic resistance to tamoxifen therapy. These characteristics were not observed in animals in which the circadian melatonin rhythm was not disrupted, or in animals subjected to dLEN if they received nocturnal melatonin replacement. Strikingly, our results also showed that melatonin acted both as a tumor metabolic inhibitor and a circadian-regulated kinase inhibitor to reestablish the sensitivity of breast tumors to tamoxifen and tumor regression. Together, our findings show how dLEN-mediated disturbances in nocturnal melatonin production can render tumors insensitive to tamoxifen. Cancer Res; 74(15); 4099-110. (c)2014 AACR.
Address Departments of Structural and Cellular Biology and Tulane Cancer Center and Louisiana Cancer Research Consortium; Tulane Circadian Cancer Biology Group; and
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0008-5472 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:25062775; PMCID:PMC4119539 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 355
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