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Author Bergs, R.
Title Exploring the Spatial Economy by Night Type Report
Year 2016 Publication n/a Abbreviated Journal n/a
Volume n/a Issue n/a Pages n/a
Keywords Economics; DMSP; DMSP-OLS; remote sensing; spatial distribution
Abstract Night satellite images may offer an interesting tool to generate socio-economically relevant data and to analyse the evolution of space, e.g. cities or rural areas, and how spatial units interact over time. This paper is just an essay with preliminary ideas for discussion; the approach is explorative-methodological rather than one putting an empirical focus on a defined research item. Empirics discussed in this paper are just various examples collected from tinkering.

The DMSP-OLS images and adequate image analysis software such as ImageJ (in some cases to be complemented by further statistics software) provide a useful perspective for the analysis of spatial change. Since there is a stable and significant correlation between social and economic variables (population density, GDP PPP) and luminosity, such image analyses contain important information on spatial economic development. Analysis of night imagery is certainly not adequate to replace the statistical analysis of regional data, but it is a good tool to confirm and illustrate patterns of spatial heterogeneity and spatial dependence over time.
Address PRAC – Bergs & Issa Partnership Co., Bad Soden, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher n/a Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Planung & Forschung Spolicy Research & Consultancy Discussion Paper Series Abbreviated Series Title
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Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1392
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Author Boscarino, B.T.; Rudstam, L.G.; Eillenberger, J.L.; O'Gorman, R.
Title Importance of light, temperature, zooplankton and fish in predicting the nighttime vertical distribution of Mysis diluviana Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Aquat Biol Abbreviated Journal
Volume 5 Issue Pages 263-279
Keywords Animals; Mysis relicta; Modeling; Migration; Zooplankton; Vertical distribution; DVM
Abstract The opossum shrimp Mysis diluviana (formerly M. relicta) performs large amplitude diel vertical migrations in Lake Ontario and its nighttime distribution is influenced by temperature, light and the distribution of its predators and prey. At one location in southeastern Lake Ontario, we measured the vertical distribution of mysids, mysid predators (i.e. planktivorous fishes) and mysid prey (i.e. zooplankton), in addition to light and temperature, on 8 occasions from May to September, 2004 and 2005. We use these data to test 3 different predictive models of mysid habitat selection, based on: (1) laboratory-derived responses of mysids to different light and temperature gradients in the absence of predator or prey cues; (2) growth rate of mysids, as estimated with a mysid bioenergetics model, given known prey densities and temperatures at different depths in the water column; (3) ratio of growth rates (g) and mortality risk (μ) associated with the distribution of predatory fishes. The model based on light and temperature preferences was a better predictor of mysid vertical distribution than the models based on growth rate and g:μ on all 8 occasions. Although mysid temperature and light preferences probably evolved as mechanisms to reduce predation while increasing foraging intake, the response to temperature and light alone predicts mysid vertical distribution across seasons in Lake Ontario.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 402
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Author Chen, B.; Shi, G.; Wang, B.; Zhao, J.; Tan, S.
Title Estimation of the anthropogenic heat release distribution in China from 1992 to 2009 Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Acta Meteorologica Sinica Abbreviated Journal Acta Meteorol Sin
Volume 26 Issue 4 Pages 507-515
Keywords DMSP/OLS; estimation; distribution; anthropogenic heat flux; China; remote sensing
Abstract Stable light data from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP)/Operational Linescan System (OLS) satellites and authoritative energy consumption data distributed by National Bureau of Statistics of China were applied to estimating the distribution of anthropogenic heat release in China from 1992 to 2009. A strong linear relationship was found between DMSP/OLS digital number data and anthropogenic heat flux density (AHFD). The results indicate that anthropogenic heat release in China was geographically concentrated and was fundamentally correlated with economic activities. The anthropogenic heat release in economically developed areas in northern, eastern, and southern China was much larger than other regions, whereas it was very small in northwestern and southwestern China. The mean AHFD in China increased from 0.07 W m−2 in 1978 to 0.28 W m−2 in 2008. The results indicate that in the anthropogenic heat-concentrated regions of Beijing, the Yangtze River Delta, and the Pearl River Delta, the AHFD levels were much higher than the average. The effect of aggravating anthropogenic heat release on climate change deserves further investigation.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0894-0525 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 215
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Author Jin, X.; Li, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zheng, J.; Liu, H.
Title An Approach to Evaluating Light Pollution in Residential Zones: A Case Study of Beijing Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability
Volume 9 Issue 4 Pages 652
Keywords Measurements; light pollution; monitoring approach; spatial distribution; residential zone; Beijing; China
Abstract Outdoor lighting is becoming increasingly widespread, and residents are suffering from serious light pollution as a result. Residents’ awareness of their rights to protection has gradually increased. However, due to the sometimes-inaccessible nature of residential vertical light incidence intensity data and the high cost of obtaining specific measurements, there is no appropriate hierarchic compensation for residents suffering from different degrees of light pollution. It is therefore important to measure light pollution levels and their damage at the neighborhood scale to provide residents with basic materials for proper protection and to create more politically-suitable solutions. This article presents a light pollution assessment method that is easy to perform, is low-cost and has a short data-processing cycle. This method can be used to monitor residential zone light pollution in other cities. We chose three open areas to test the spatial variation pattern of light intensity. The results are in accordance with spatial interpolation patterns and can be fit, with high precision, using the inverse distance weighted interpolation (IDW) method. This approach can also be used in three dimensions to quantitatively evaluate the distribution of light intensity. We use a mixed-use zone in Beijing known as The Place as our case study area. The vertical illumination at the windows of residential buildings ranges from 2 lux to 23 lux; the illumination in some areas is far higher than the value recommended by CIE. Such severe light pollution can seriously interfere with people’s daily lives and has a serious influence on their rest and health. The results of this survey will serve as an important database to assess whether the planning of night-time lighting is scientific, and it will help protect the rights of residents and establish distinguished compensation mechanisms for light pollution.
Address Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100101, China; Tel. +86-10-5880-7455
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1683
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Author Johansen, N.S.; Vänninen, I.; Pinto, D.M.; Nissinen, A.I.; Shipp, L.
Title In the light of new greenhouse technologies: 2. Direct effects of artificial lighting on arthropods and integrated pest management in greenhouse crops Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Annals of Applied Biology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 159 Issue 1 Pages 1-27
Keywords Behaviour; biology; insects; light intensity; mites; photobiology; photoperiod; photoreceptors; plant protection; visual ecology; wavelength distribution
Abstract Novel lighting technology offers the possibility of improved arthropod integrated pest management (IPM) in artificially lighted crops. This review compiles the current knowledge on how greenhouse pest and beneficial arthropods are directly affected by light, with the focus on whiteflies. The effect of ultraviolet depletion on orientation and colour-coded phototaxis are to some extent studied and utilised for control of the flying adult stage of some pest species, but far less is known about the visual ecology of commercially used biological control agents and pollinators, and about how light affects arthropod biology in different life stages. Four approaches for utilisation of artificial light in IPM of whiteflies are suggested: (a) use of attractive visual stimuli incorporated into traps for monitoring and direct control, (b) use of visual stimuli that disrupt the host-detection process, (c) radiation with harmful or inhibitory wavelengths to kill or suppress pest populations and (d) use of time cues to manipulate daily rhythms and photoperiodic responses. Knowledge gaps are identified to design a road map for research on IPM in crops lighted with high-pressure sodium lamps, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and photoselective films. LEDs are concluded to offer possibilities for behavioural manipulation of arthropods, but the extent of such possibilities depends in practice on which wavelength combinations are determined to be optimal for plant production. Furthermore, the direct effects of artificial lighting on IPM must be studied in the context of plant-mediated effects of artificial light on arthropods, as both types of manipulations are possible, particularly with LEDs.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-4746 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 112
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