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Author Hölker, F.; Wurzbacher, C.; Weißenborn, C.; Monaghan, M.T.; Holzhauer, S.I.J.; Premke, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Microbial diversity and community respiration in freshwater sediments influenced by artificial light at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci  
  Volume 370 Issue Pages 20140130  
  Keywords Animals; DNA metabarcoding; next-generation sequencing; light pollution; photoautotrophs; diatoms; Cyanobacteria; primary production; carbon turnover; freshwater  
  Abstract An increasing proportion of the Earth's surface is illuminated at night. In aquatic ecosystems, artificial light at night (ALAN) may influence microbial communities living in the sediments. These communities are highly diverse and play an important role in the global carbon cycle. We combined field and laboratory experiments using sediments from an agricultural drainage system to examine how ALAN affects communities and alters carbon mineralization. Two identical light infrastructures were installed parallel to a drainage ditch before the start of the experiment. DNA metabarcoding indicated that both sediment communities were similar. After one was lit for five months (July–December 2012) we observed an increase in abundance (diatoms, Cyanobacteria) in ALAN-exposed sediments. In laboratory incubations mimicking summer and winter (six weeks each), communities in sediments that were exposed to ALAN for 1 year (July 2012–June 2013) showed less overall seasonal change compared with ALAN-naive sediments. Nocturnal community respiration was reduced in ALAN-exposed sediments. In long-term exposed summer-sediments, we observed a shift from negative to positive net ecosystem production. Our results indicate ALAN may alter sediment microbial communities over time, with implications for ecosystem-level functions. It may thus have the potential to transform inland waters to nocturnal carbon sinks.  
  Address Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB), Mu¨ggelseedamm 301/310, Berlin 12587, Germany; hoelker@igb-berlin.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title The biological impacts of artificial light at night: from molecules to communities Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1127  
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Author Holzhauer S.I.J.; Franke S.; Kyba C.C.M.; Manfrin A.; Klenke R.; Voigt C.C.; Lewanzik D.; Oehlert M.; Monaghan M.T.; Schneider S.; Heller S.; Kuechly H.; Brüning A.; Honnen A.-C.; Hölker F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Out of the Dark: Establishing a Large-Scale Field Experiment to Assess the Effects of Artificial Light at Night on Species and Food Webs Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 7 Issue 11 Pages 15593-15616  
  Keywords ALAN; artificial light at night; ecosystems; freshwater; light pollution; loss of the night; photometric characterization; riparian; Verlust der Nacht  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is one of the most obvious hallmarks of human presence in an ecosystem. The rapidly increasing use of artificial light has fundamentally transformed nightscapes throughout most of the globe, although little is known about how ALAN impacts the biodiversity and food webs of illuminated ecosystems. We developed a large-scale experimental infrastructure to study the effects of ALAN on a light-naïve, natural riparian (i.e., terrestrial-aquatic) ecosystem. Twelve street lights (20 m apart) arranged in three rows parallel to an agricultural drainage ditch were installed on each of two sites located in a grassland ecosystem in northern Germany. A range of biotic, abiotic, and photometric data are collected regularly to study the short- and long-term effects of ALAN on behavior, species interactions, physiology, and species composition of communities. Here we describe the infrastructure setup and data collection methods, and characterize the study area including photometric measurements. None of the measured parameters differed significantly between sites in the period before illumination. Results of one short-term experiment, carried out with one site illuminated and the other acting as a control, demonstrate the attraction of ALAN by the immense and immediate increase of insect catches at the lit street lights. The experimental setup provides a unique platform for carrying out interdisciplinary research on sustainable lighting.  
  Address Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB), Müggelseedamm 301/310, 12587 Berlin, Germany; holzhauer(at)igb-berlin.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1305  
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Author Mehner, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Diel vertical migration of freshwater fishes – proximate triggers, ultimate causes and research perspectives: Diel vertical migration in freshwater fishes Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Freshwater Biology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 57 Issue 7 Pages 1342-1359  
  Keywords diel vertical migration; *Fishes; freshwater fish  
  Abstract 1. Diel vertical migrations (DVM) are typical for many cold-water fish species such as Pacific salmons (Oncorhynchus spp.) and coregonids (Coregonus spp.) inhabiting deep lakes. A comprehensive recent overview of DVM in freshwater fish has not been available, however.

2. The main proximate trigger of DVM in freshwater fish is the diel change in light intensity, with declining illumination at dusk triggering the ascent and the increase at dawn triggering the descent. Additional proximate cues are hydrostatic pressure and water temperature, which may guide fish into particular water layers at night.

3. Ultimate causes of DVM encompass bioenergetics efficiency, feeding opportunities and predator avoidance. None of these factors alone can explain the DVM in all cases. Multi-factorial hypotheses, such as the ‘antipredation window’ combined with the thermal niche hypothesis, are more likely to explain DVM. It is suggested that planktivorous fish move within a layer sufficiently well illuminated to capture zooplankton, but too dark for predators to feed upon the migrating fish. In complete darkness, fish seek layers with a temperature that optimises bioenergetics efficiency. The strength of each factor may differ from lake to lake, and hence system-specific individual analyses are needed.

4. Mechanistic details that are still poorly explored are the costs of buoyancy regulation and migration, the critical light thresholds for feeding of planktivorous and piscivorous fish, and predator assessment by (and size-dependent predation risk of) the prey fish.

5. A comprehensive understanding of the adaptive value of DVM can be attained only if the behaviour of individual fish within migrating populations is explicitly taken into account. Size, condition and reproductive value differ between individuals, suggesting that migrating populations should split into migrants and non-migrants for whom the balance between mortality risk and growth rate can differ. There is increasing evidence for this type of partial DVM within populations.

6. Whereas patterns of DVM are well documented, the evolution of DVM is still only poorly understood. Because experimental approaches at realistic natural scales remain difficult, a combination of comprehensive data sets with modelling is likely to resolve the relative importance of different proximate and ultimate causes behind DVM in fish.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0046-5070 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 66  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Perkin, E.K.; Hölker, F.; Heller, S.; Berghahn, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light and nocturnal activity in gammarids Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication PeerJ Abbreviated Journal PeerJ  
  Volume 2 Issue Pages e279  
  Keywords Acclimation; Gammarus; Invertebrate drift; Light pollution; Multispecies freshwater biomonitor  
  Abstract Artificial light is gaining attention as a potential stressor to aquatic ecosystems. Artificial lights located near streams increase light levels experienced by stream invertebrates and we hypothesized light would depress night drift rates. We also hypothesized that the effect of light on drift rates would decrease over time as the invertebrates acclimated to the new light level over the course of one month's exposure. These hypotheses were tested by placing Gammarus spp. in eight, 75 m x 1 m artificial flumes. One flume was exposed to strong (416 lx) artificial light at night. This strong light created a gradient between 4.19 and 0.04 lx over the neighboring six artificial flumes, while a control flume was completely covered with black plastic at night. Night-time light measurements taken in the Berlin area confirm that half the flumes were at light levels experienced by urban aquatic invertebrates. Surprisingly, no light treatment affected gammarid drift rates. In contrast, physical activity measurements of in situ individually caged G. roeseli showed they increased short-term activity levels in nights of complete darkness and decreased activity levels in brightly lit flumes. Both nocturnal and diurnal drift increased, and day drift rates were unexpectadly higher than nocturnal drift.  
  Address Umweltbundesamt , Berlin , Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24688857; PMCID:PMC3961812 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 322  
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