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Author (up) Cochran, W.W.; Mouritsen, H.; Wikelski, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Migrating songbirds recalibrate their magnetic compass daily from twilight cues Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 304 Issue 5669 Pages 405-408  
  Keywords *Animal Migration; Animals; Biological Clocks; Calibration; Cues; *Flight, Animal; Geography; *Magnetics; *Orientation; *Solar System; Songbirds/*physiology  
  Abstract Night migratory songbirds can use stars, sun, geomagnetic field, and polarized light for orientation when tested in captivity. We studied the interaction of magnetic, stellar, and twilight orientation cues in free-flying songbirds. We exposed Catharus thrushes to eastward-turned magnetic fields during the twilight period before takeoff and then followed them for up to 1100 kilometers. Instead of heading north, experimental birds flew westward. On subsequent nights, the same individuals migrated northward again. We suggest that birds orient with a magnetic compass calibrated daily from twilight cues. This could explain how birds cross the magnetic equator and deal with declination.  
  Address Illinois Natural History Survey, 607 East Peabody Drive, Champaign, IL61820, USA. Sparrow@springnet1.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:15087541 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 57  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Dunnett, O, url  openurl
  Title Contested landscapes: the moral geographies of light pollution in Britain Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Cultural Geographies Abbreviated Journal Cultural Geographies  
  Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 619-636  
  Keywords Light pollution; geography; darkness; moral geographies; urbanization  
  Abstract This paper considers the concept of light pollution and its connections to moral geographies of landscape in Britain. The paper aims to provide a greater understanding of light pollution in the present day, where the issue connects to policy debates about energy efficiency, crime, health, ecology and night time aesthetics, whilst also engaging with new areas of research in cultural geography. The main sources of investigation are the Campaign to Protect Rural England and the British Astronomical Association’s Campaign for Dark Skies (est. 1990). Using interviews, archival and textual analysis, the paper examines this anti-light-pollution lobby, looking at the lead-up to the formation of the Campaign as well as its ongoing influence. A moral geography of light pollution is identified, drawing on two interconnected discourses – a notion of the ‘astronomical sublime’ and the problem of urbanization. Whilst the former is often invoked, both through visual and linguistic means, by anti-light pollution campaigners, the latter is characterized as a threat to clear night skies, echoing earlier protests against urban sprawl. Complementing a growing area of research, the geographies of light and darkness, this paper considers the light pollution lobby as a way of investigating the fundamental relationship between humankind and the cosmos in the modern age.  
  Address School of Geography, Archaeology and Palaeoecology, Elmwood Avenue, Belfast BT7 1NN, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 353  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Gandy, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Negative Luminescence Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Annals of the American Association of Geographers Abbreviated Journal Ann. Amer. Assn. Geographers  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-18  
  Keywords Society; geography; urbanism; history  
  Abstract The increasingly pervasive phenomenon of light pollution spans several different fields of concern, including the loss of the night sky, energy wastage, and the effects of artificial light on circadian rhythms and nocturnal ecology. Although the scale of the problem has grown significantly in recent decades, the underlying dynamics remain only partially understood beyond the identification of specific technological pathways such as the rise of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or the capitalist transformation of the nocturnal realm. It is suggested that current approaches to the study of light, including the identification of “urban atmospheres,” the elaboration of existing approaches to urban ecology, or the extension of “smart city” type discourses, do not capture the full complexity of the politics of light under late modernity.  
  Address Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, Downing Place, Cambridge CB2 3EN, UK; mg107(at)cam.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2469-4452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1665  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Muheim, R.; Phillips, J.B.; Akesson, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Polarized light cues underlie compass calibration in migratory songbirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 313 Issue 5788 Pages 837-839  
  Keywords Alaska; *Animal Migration; Animals; Calibration; Cues; *Flight, Animal; Geography; *Light; Magnetics; *Orientation; Seasons; Sparrows/*physiology; Sunlight  
  Abstract Migratory songbirds use the geomagnetic field, stars, the Sun, and polarized light patterns to determine their migratory direction. To prevent navigational errors, it is necessary to calibrate all of these compass systems to a common reference. We show that migratory Savannah sparrows use polarized light cues from the region of sky near the horizon to recalibrate the magnetic compass at both sunrise and sunset. We suggest that skylight polarization patterns are used to derive an absolute (i.e., geographic) directional system that provides the primary calibration reference for all of the compasses of migratory songbirds.  
  Address Department of Animal Ecology, Lund University, Ecology Building, SE-223 62 Lund, Sweden. rmuheim@vt.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16902138 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 243  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Shaw, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Night as Fragmenting Frontier: Understanding the Night that Remains in an era of24/7: Night as Fragmenting Frontier Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Geography Compass Abbreviated Journal Geography Compass  
  Volume 9 Issue 12 Pages 637-647  
  Keywords Society; geography; social science  
  Abstract Social scientists have previously understood the night through a frontier metaphor. This has pitched night as an empty or lightly inhabited space into which the urban, capitalist day has been expanding. The contemporary increase in nocturnal research has complicated this picture, showing an increasing multiplicity of complexly lived, structured and experienced nights across the globe. This paper looks to retrieve the concept of night as frontier by drawing on postcolonial theories to generate a more subtle conceptualisation of ‘frontier’, while also arguing that recent research reveals that this frontier is now fragmenting. By exploring research into a series of core themes – artificial light at night and darkness; night-lives; and global nights – I then explore what such an understanding of night allows us to say about current research. As nocturnal social science continues to mature, a more critical eye will need to be paid to the complexity of shifting power relations and identities within this fragmenting nocturnal frontier.  
  Address School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, Claremont Tower, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 7RU; robert.shaw2(at)ncl.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1749-8198 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1326  
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