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Author (down) Zanquetta, M.M.; Correa-Giannella, M.L.; Monteiro, M.B.; Villares, S.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Body weight, metabolism and clock genes Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome Abbreviated Journal Diabetol Metab Syndr  
  Volume 2 Issue Pages 53  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Biological rhythms are present in the lives of almost all organisms ranging from plants to more evolved creatures. These oscillations allow the anticipation of many physiological and behavioral mechanisms thus enabling coordination of rhythms in a timely manner, adaption to environmental changes and more efficient organization of the cellular processes responsible for survival of both the individual and the species. Many components of energy homeostasis exhibit circadian rhythms, which are regulated by central (suprachiasmatic nucleus) and peripheral (located in other tissues) circadian clocks. Adipocyte plays an important role in the regulation of energy homeostasis, the signaling of satiety and cellular differentiation and proliferation. Also, the adipocyte circadian clock is probably involved in the control of many of these functions. Thus, circadian clocks are implicated in the control of energy balance, feeding behavior and consequently in the regulation of body weight. In this regard, alterations in clock genes and rhythms can interfere with the complex mechanism of metabolic and hormonal anticipation, contributing to multifactorial diseases such as obesity and diabetes. The aim of this review was to define circadian clocks by describing their functioning and role in the whole body and in adipocyte metabolism, as well as their influence on body weight control and the development of obesity.  
  Address Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Endocrinology (LIM/25) – University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo, Brazil. mzanquetta@usp.br  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1758-5996 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20712885; PMCID:PMC2930623 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 838  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zahra, H. S., Iqbal, A., Hassan, S. H., Shakir, H. A., Khan, M., Irfan, M., ... & Ali, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Epigenetics: A Bridge between Artificial Light at Night and Breast Cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Punjab University Journal of Zoology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 34 Issue 2 Pages 231-238  
  Keywords Review; Human Health  
  Abstract The second most frequent cancer all over the world is breast cancer (BC). It is

reported that only about 10% BC cases are attributed due to inherited genetic mutations while remaining 90% cancer cases are associated with environmental factors. Artificial light at night (ALAN) is considered one of the major environmental risk factors for breast cancer. It inhibits production of melatonin (MLT) from pineal gland which results in abnormal epigenetic changes that relates with an increased risk of BC. The most important ALAN-mediated epigenetic changes include methylation of DNA and acetylation of histone, which are significant for growth, development and progression of BC. DNA hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands inhibits transcriptional activity by methyltransferase enzyme which results in inactivation of tumor suppressor genes (TSG), while in hypomethylation, demethyltransferase enzyme causes the activation of oncogenes by promoting transcriptional activity. Contrary to DNA methylation, histone acetylation and deacetylation results in chromatin opening and closing, respectively; leading to transcriptional activation and inactivation of genes. Histone acetylation has been frequently detected in oncogenes while histone deacetylation in TSG. Collective data from various studies demonstrate that DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation of TSG lead to inactivation of TSG and activation of oncogenes. The purpose of this review is to discuss the evidence based relationship between ALAN and oncogenes expression through epigenetic remodeling by DNA methylation and histone acetylation.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2973  
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Author (down) Youngstedt, S.D.; Elliott, J.A.; Kripke, D.F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Human Circadian Phase-Response Curves for Exercise Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication The Journal of Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Physiol  
  Volume 597 Issue 8 Pages 2253-2268  
  Keywords Human Health; Circadian Rhythm; Exercise  
  Abstract KEY POINTS: Exercise elicits circadian phase-shifting effects, but additional information is needed. The phase-response curve describing the magnitude and direction of circadian rhythm phase shifts depending on the time of the zeigeber (time cue) stimulus is the most fundamental chronobiological tool for alleviating circadian misalignment and related morbidity. 51 older and 48 young adults followed a circadian rhythms measurement protocol for up to 5.5 days, and performed 1 h of moderate treadmill exercise for 3 consecutive days at one of 8 times of day/night. Temporal changes in the phase of 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) were measured from evening onset, cosine acrophase, morning offset, and duration of excretion, establishing significant PRCs for aMT6 onset and acrophase with large phase delays from 7-10 PM and large phase advances at both 7 AM and 1-4 PM. Along with known synergism with bright light, the above PRCs with a second phase advance region (afternoon) could support both practical and clinical applications. ABSTRACT: Although bright light is regarded as the primary circadian zeitgeber, its limitations support exploring alternative zeitgebers. Exercise elicits significant circadian phase-shifting effects, but fundamental information regarding these effects is needed. The primary aim of this study was to establish phase-response curves (PRC) documenting the size and direction of phase shifts in relation to the circadian time of exercise. Aerobically fit older (n = 51, 59-75 y) and young adults (n = 48, 18-30 y) followed a 90-min laboratory ultra-short sleep wake cycle (60 min wake/30 min sleep) for up to 5 (1/2) days. At the same clock time on three consecutive days, each participant performed 60 min of moderate treadmill exercise (65-75% of heart rate reserve) at one of 8 times of day/night. To describe PRCs, phase shifts were measured for the cosine-fitted acrophase of urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s), as well as for the evening rise, morning decline, and change in duration of aMT6s excretion. Significant PRCs were found for aMT6s acrophase, onset and duration, with peak phase advances corresponding to clock times of 7 AM and 1PM-4PM, delays from 7 PM-10 PM, and minimal shifts around 4 PM and 2 AM. There were no significant age or sex differences. The amplitudes of the aMT6s onset and acrophase PRCs are comparable to expectations for bright light of equal duration. The phase advance to afternoon exercise and the exercise-induced PRC for change in aMT6s duration are novel findings. The results support further research exploring additive phase shifting effects of bright light and exercise and health benefits. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, CA  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-3751 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30784068 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2230  
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Author (down) Yates, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Perspective: The Long-Term Effects of Light Exposure on Establishment of Newborn Circadian Rhythm Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Jcsm  
  Volume 14 Issue 10 Pages 1829-1830  
  Keywords Commentary; Human Health  
  Abstract Development of newborns continues postnatally. Evidence has accumulated on the early life programming effects of light exposure on the maturing visual axis and the developing circadian rhythm. Consideration of the effects of light at night and insufficient light during the day should occur when giving anticipatory guidance in the care of newborn infants. Long-term health consequences of light imprinting may occur with inappropriate light-dark environments during the newborn period.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1550-9389 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2032  
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Author (down) Yang, M.; Ma, N.; Zhu, Y.; Su, Y.-C.; Chen, Q.; Hsiao, F.-C.; Ji, Y.; Yang, C.-M.; Zhou, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Acute Effects of Intermittent Light Exposure in the Evening on Alertness and Subsequent Sleep Architecture Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health Abbreviated Journal Int J Environ Res Public Health  
  Volume 15 Issue 3 Pages  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Exposure to bright light is typically intermittent in our daily life. However, the acute effects of intermittent light on alertness and sleep have seldom been explored. To investigate this issue, we employed within-subject design and compared the effects of three light conditions: intermittent bright light (30-min pulse of blue-enriched bright light (~1000 lux, ~6000 K) alternating with 30-min dim normal light (~5 lux, ~3600 K) three times); continuous bright light; and continuous dim light on subjective and objective alertness and subsequent sleep structure. Each light exposure was conducted during the three hours before bedtime. Fifteen healthy volunteers (20 +/- 3.4 years; seven males) were scheduled to stay in the sleep laboratory for four separated nights (one for adaptation and the others for the light exposures) with a period of at least one week between nights. The results showed that when compared with dim light, both intermittent light and continuous bright light significantly increased subjective alertness and decreased sleep efficiency (SE) and total sleep time (TST). Intermittent light significantly increased objective alertness than dim light did during the second half of the light-exposure period. Our results suggested that intermittent light was as effective as continuous bright light in their acute effects in enhancing subjective and objective alertness and in negatively impacting subsequent sleep.  
  Address Shenzhen Guohua Optoelectronics Tech. Co., Ltd., Shenzhen 518110, China. guofu.zhou@m.scnu.edu.cn  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1660-4601 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29543731 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1822  
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