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Author Takemura, Y.; Ito, M.; Shimizu, Y.; Okano, K.; Okano, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Adaptive light: a lighting control method aligned with dark adaptation of human vision Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages (down) 11204  
  Keywords Human Health; Vision; Lighting  
  Abstract Light exposure before sleep causes a reduction in the quality and duration of sleep. In order to reduce these detrimental effects of light exposure, it is important to dim the light. However, dimming the light often causes inconvenience and can lower the quality of life (QOL). We therefore aimed to develop a lighting control method for use before going to bed, in which the illuminance of lights can be ramped down with less of a subjective feeling of changes in illuminance. We performed seven experiments in a double-blind, randomized crossover design. In each experiment, we compared two lighting conditions. We examined constant illuminance, linear dimming, and three monophasic and three biphasic exponential dimming, to explore the fast and slow increases in visibility that reflect the dark adaptation of cone and rod photoreceptors in the retina, respectively. Finally, we developed a biphasic exponential dimming method termed Adaptive Light 1.0. Adaptive Light 1.0 significantly prevented the misidentification seen in constant light and effectively suppressed perceptions of the illuminance change. This novel lighting method will help to develop new intelligent lighting instruments that reduce the negative effect of light on sleep and also lower energy consumption.  
  Address The Smart Life Science Institute, ACROSS, Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan. okano@waseda.jp  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32641723; PMCID:PMC7343865 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3050  
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Author Blask, D.E.; Brainard, G.C.; Dauchy, R.T.; Hanifin, J.P.; Davidson, L.K.; Krause, J.A.; Sauer, L.A.; Rivera-Bermudez, M.A.; Dubocovich, M.L.; Jasser, S.A.; Lynch, D.T.; Rollag, M.D.; Zalatan, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Melatonin-depleted blood from premenopausal women exposed to light at night stimulates growth of human breast cancer xenografts in nude rats Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Cancer Research Abbreviated Journal Cancer Res  
  Volume 65 Issue 23 Pages (down) 11174-11184  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Breast Neoplasms/*blood/genetics/pathology; Cell Growth Processes/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Humans; Light; Liver Neoplasms, Experimental/metabolism; Male; Melatonin/blood/*deficiency; Premenopause/blood; RNA, Messenger/biosynthesis/genetics; Rats; Rats, Nude; Receptors, Melatonin/biosynthesis/genetics; Transplantation, Heterologous  
  Abstract The increased breast cancer risk in female night shift workers has been postulated to result from the suppression of pineal melatonin production by exposure to light at night. Exposure of rats bearing rat hepatomas or human breast cancer xenografts to increasing intensities of white fluorescent light during each 12-hour dark phase (0-345 microW/cm2) resulted in a dose-dependent suppression of nocturnal melatonin blood levels and a stimulation of tumor growth and linoleic acid uptake/metabolism to the mitogenic molecule 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid. Venous blood samples were collected from healthy, premenopausal female volunteers during either the daytime, nighttime, or nighttime following 90 minutes of ocular bright, white fluorescent light exposure at 580 microW/cm2 (i.e., 2,800 lx). Compared with tumors perfused with daytime-collected melatonin-deficient blood, human breast cancer xenografts and rat hepatomas perfused in situ, with nocturnal, physiologically melatonin-rich blood collected during the night, exhibited markedly suppressed proliferative activity and linoleic acid uptake/metabolism. Tumors perfused with melatonin-deficient blood collected following ocular exposure to light at night exhibited the daytime pattern of high tumor proliferative activity. These results are the first to show that the tumor growth response to exposure to light during darkness is intensity dependent and that the human nocturnal, circadian melatonin signal not only inhibits human breast cancer growth but that this effect is extinguished by short-term ocular exposure to bright, white light at night. These mechanistic studies are the first to provide a rational biological explanation for the increased breast cancer risk in female night shift workers.  
  Address Laboratory of Chrono-Neuroendocrine Oncology, Bassett Research Institute, The Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, Cooperstown, New York 13326, USA. david.blask@bassett.org  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0008-5472 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16322268 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 721  
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Author Stone, J.E.; Phillips, A.J.K.; Ftouni, S.; Magee, M.; Howard, M.; Lockley, S.W.; Sletten, T.L.; Anderson, C.; Rajaratnam, S.M.W.; Postnova, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Generalizability of A Neural Network Model for Circadian Phase Prediction in Real-World Conditions Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages (down) 11001  
  Keywords Human Health; Instrumentation  
  Abstract A neural network model was previously developed to predict melatonin rhythms accurately from blue light and skin temperature recordings in individuals on a fixed sleep schedule. This study aimed to test the generalizability of the model to other sleep schedules, including rotating shift work. Ambulatory wrist blue light irradiance and skin temperature data were collected in 16 healthy individuals on fixed and habitual sleep schedules, and 28 rotating shift workers. Artificial neural network models were trained to predict the circadian rhythm of (i) salivary melatonin on a fixed sleep schedule; (ii) urinary aMT6s on both fixed and habitual sleep schedules, including shift workers on a diurnal schedule; and (iii) urinary aMT6s in rotating shift workers on a night shift schedule. To determine predicted circadian phase, center of gravity of the fitted bimodal skewed baseline cosine curve was used for melatonin, and acrophase of the cosine curve for aMT6s. On a fixed sleep schedule, the model predicted melatonin phase to within +/- 1 hour in 67% and +/- 1.5 hours in 100% of participants, with mean absolute error of 41 +/- 32 minutes. On diurnal schedules, including shift workers, the model predicted aMT6s acrophase to within +/- 1 hour in 66% and +/- 2 hours in 87% of participants, with mean absolute error of 63 +/- 67 minutes. On night shift schedules, the model predicted aMT6s acrophase to within +/- 1 hour in 42% and +/- 2 hours in 53% of participants, with mean absolute error of 143 +/- 155 minutes. Prediction accuracy was similar when using either 1 (wrist) or 11 skin temperature sensor inputs. These findings demonstrate that the model can predict circadian timing to within +/- 2 hours for the vast majority of individuals on diurnal schedules, using blue light and a single temperature sensor. However, this approach did not generalize to night shift conditions.  
  Address School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31358781; PMCID:PMC6662750 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2667  
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Author Sporl, F.; Korge, S.; Jurchott, K.; Wunderskirchner, M.; Schellenberg, K.; Heins, S.; Specht, A.; Stoll, C.; Klemz, R.; Maier, B.; Wenck, H.; Schrader, A.; Kunz, D.; Blatt, T.; Kramer, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Kruppel-like factor 9 is a circadian transcription factor in human epidermis that controls proliferation of keratinocytes Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A  
  Volume 109 Issue 27 Pages (down) 10903-10908  
  Keywords Human Health; Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology; Biological Clocks/genetics/physiology; Cell Differentiation/physiology; Cell Proliferation/drug effects; Cells, Cultured; Circadian Rhythm/genetics/*physiology; Epidermis/cytology/*physiology; Genome-Wide Association Study; Homeostasis/physiology; Humans; Hydrocortisone/pharmacology; Keratinocytes/cytology/drug effects/*physiology; Kruppel-Like Transcription Factors/*genetics/*metabolism; Luciferases/genetics; Skin Neoplasms/genetics/physiopathology  
  Abstract Circadian clocks govern a wide range of cellular and physiological functions in various organisms. Recent evidence suggests distinct functions of local clocks in peripheral mammalian tissues such as immune responses and cell cycle control. However, studying circadian action in peripheral tissues has been limited so far to mouse models, leaving the implication for human systems widely elusive. In particular, circadian rhythms in human skin, which is naturally exposed to strong daytime-dependent changes in the environment, have not been investigated to date on a molecular level. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of circadian gene expression in human epidermis. Whole-genome microarray analysis of suction-blister epidermis obtained throughout the day revealed a functional circadian clock in epidermal keratinocytes with hundreds of transcripts regulated in a daytime-dependent manner. Among those, we identified a circadian transcription factor, Kruppel-like factor 9 (Klf9), that is substantially up-regulated in a cortisol and differentiation-state-dependent manner. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments showed strong antiproliferative effects of Klf9. Putative Klf9 target genes include proliferation/differentiation markers that also show circadian expression in vivo, suggesting that Klf9 affects keratinocyte proliferation/differentiation by controlling the expression of target genes in a daytime-dependent manner.  
  Address Research and Development, Beiersdorf AG, 20245 Hamburg, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22711835; PMCID:PMC3390879 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 814  
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Author deHaro, D.; Kines, K.J.; Sokolowski, M.; Dauchy, R.T.; Streva, V.A.; Hill, S.M.; Hanifin, J.P.; Brainard, G.C.; Blask, D.E.; Belancio, V.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Regulation of L1 expression and retrotransposition by melatonin and its receptor: implications for cancer risk associated with light exposure at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Nucleic Acids Research Abbreviated Journal Nucleic Acids Res  
  Volume 42 Issue 12 Pages (down) 7694-7707  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Expression of long interspersed element-1 (L1) is upregulated in many human malignancies. L1 can introduce genomic instability via insertional mutagenesis and DNA double-strand breaks, both of which may promote cancer. Light exposure at night, a recently recognized carcinogen, is associated with an increased risk of cancer in shift workers. We report that melatonin receptor 1 inhibits mobilization of L1 in cultured cells through downregulation of L1 mRNA and ORF1 protein. The addition of melatonin receptor antagonists abolishes the MT1 effect on retrotransposition in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, melatonin-rich, but not melatonin-poor, human blood collected at different times during the circadian cycle suppresses endogenous L1 mRNA during in situ perfusion of tissue-isolated xenografts of human cancer. Supplementation of human blood with exogenous melatonin or melatonin receptor antagonist during the in situ perfusion establishes a receptor-mediated action of melatonin on L1 expression. Combined tissue culture and in vivo data support that environmental light exposure of the host regulates expression of L1 elements in tumors. Our data imply that light-induced suppression of melatonin production in shift workers may increase L1-induced genomic instability in their genomes and suggest a possible connection between L1 activity and increased incidence of cancer associated with circadian disruption.  
  Address Department of Structural and Cellular Biology, Tulane School of Medicine, Tulane Cancer Center, New Orleans, LA 70115, USA Tulane Center for Aging, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA vperepe@tulane.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0305-1048 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24914052; PMCID:PMC4081101 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1414  
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