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Author Wright, K.P.J.; McHill, A.W.; Birks, B.R.; Griffin, B.R.; Rusterholz, T.; Chinoy, E.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Entrainment of the human circadian clock to the natural light-dark cycle Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 23 Issue 16 Pages (down) 1554-1558  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; Circadian Clocks/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; *Lighting; Male; *Photoperiod; *Sunlight; Young Adult; Circadian Rhythm  
  Abstract The electric light is one of the most important human inventions. Sleep and other daily rhythms in physiology and behavior, however, evolved in the natural light-dark cycle [1], and electrical lighting is thought to have disrupted these rhythms. Yet how much the age of electrical lighting has altered the human circadian clock is unknown. Here we show that electrical lighting and the constructed environment is associated with reduced exposure to sunlight during the day, increased light exposure after sunset, and a delayed timing of the circadian clock as compared to a summer natural 14 hr 40 min:9 hr 20 min light-dark cycle camping. Furthermore, we find that after exposure to only natural light, the internal circadian clock synchronizes to solar time such that the beginning of the internal biological night occurs at sunset and the end of the internal biological night occurs before wake time just after sunrise. In addition, we find that later chronotypes show larger circadian advances when exposed to only natural light, making the timing of their internal clocks in relation to the light-dark cycle more similar to earlier chronotypes. These findings have important implications for understanding how modern light exposure patterns contribute to late sleep schedules and may disrupt sleep and circadian clocks.  
  Address Sleep and Chronobiology Laboratory, Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309-0354, USA. kenneth.wright@colorado.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23910656; PMCID:PMC4020279 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 505  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jores, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Tag- und Nachtwechsel in Seiner Wirkung auf den Menschen Type Journal Article
  Year 1933 Publication Klinische Wochenschrift Abbreviated Journal Klin Wochenschr  
  Volume 12 Issue 39 Pages (down) 1538-1540  
  Keywords Human Health  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0023-2173 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 767  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sloane, P.D.; Williams, C.S.; Mitchell, C.M.; Preisser, J.S.; Wood, W.; Barrick, A.L.; Hickman, S.E.; Gill, K.S.; Connell, B.R.; Edinger, J.; Zimmerman, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title High-intensity environmental light in dementia: effect on sleep and activity Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Journal of the American Geriatrics Society Abbreviated Journal J Am Geriatr Soc  
  Volume 55 Issue 10 Pages (down) 1524-1533  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To determine whether high-intensity ambient light in public areas of long-term care facilities will improve sleeping patterns and circadian rhythms of persons with dementia. DESIGN: A cluster-unit crossover intervention trial involving four conditions: morning bright light, evening bright light, all-day bright light, and minimum standard light. SETTING: The common areas of two geriatric units in a psychiatric hospital and a dementia-specific residential care facility. PARTICIPANTS: Sixty-six older adults with dementia. INTERVENTION: Ambient bright light of approximately 2,500 lux, delivered through a low-glare lighting system installed in the dining and activity areas. Participant exposure averaged 2.5 to 3.0 hours for the morning and evening interventions and 8.4 hours for the all-day intervention. MEASUREMENTS: Nighttime sleep using wrist actigraphy and daytime activity using nonobtrusive daytime observations. RESULTS: Night-time sleep increased significantly in participants exposed to morning and all-day light, with the increase most prominent in participants with severe or very severe dementia (mean increase 16 minutes (P=.008) for morning, and 14 minutes (P=.01) for all-day). Morning light produced a mean phase advance of 29 minutes (P=.02) and evening light a mean phase delay of 15 minutes (P=.06). Effects on daytime sleepiness were inconsistent, and the number of sleep bouts, mesor, amplitude, intradaily variability, and interdaily stability were not significantly different, indicating that the overall strength of day and night activity rhythms did not change significantly under any treatment condition. CONCLUSION: Bright light appears to have a modest but measurable effect on sleep in this population, and ambient light may be preferable to stationary devices such as light boxes.  
  Address Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine; Cecil G.Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. psloane@med.unc.edu  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-8614 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:17714459 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2168  
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Author Hansen, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light at Night, Shiftwork, and Breast Cancer Risk Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication JNCI Journal of the National Cancer Institute Abbreviated Journal JNCI Journal of the National Cancer Institute  
  Volume 93 Issue 20 Pages (down) 1513-1515  
  Keywords Human Health  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8874 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 758  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Barghini, A.; de Medeiros, B.A.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial lighting as a vector attractant and cause of disease diffusion Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Environmental Health Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Environ Health Perspect  
  Volume 118 Issue 11 Pages (down) 1503-1506  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Traditionally, epidemiologists have considered electrification to be a positive factor. In fact, electrification and plumbing are typical initiatives that represent the integration of an isolated population into modern society, ensuring the control of pathogens and promoting public health. Nonetheless, electrification is always accompanied by night lighting that attracts insect vectors and changes people's behavior. Although this may lead to new modes of infection and increased transmission of insect-borne diseases, epidemiologists rarely consider the role of night lighting in their surveys. OBJECTIVE: We reviewed the epidemiological evidence concerning the role of lighting in the spread of vector-borne diseases to encourage other researchers to consider it in future studies. DISCUSSION: We present three infectious vector-borne diseases-Chagas, leishmaniasis, and malaria-and discuss evidence that suggests that the use of artificial lighting results in behavioral changes among human populations and changes in the prevalence of vector species and in the modes of transmission. CONCLUSION: Despite a surprising lack of studies, existing evidence supports our hypothesis that artificial lighting leads to a higher risk of infection from vector-borne diseases. We believe that this is related not only to the simple attraction of traditional vectors to light sources but also to changes in the behavior of both humans and insects that result in new modes of disease transmission. Considering the ongoing expansion of night lighting in developing countries, additional research on this subject is urgently needed.  
  Address Laboratorio de Estudos Evolutivos Humanos, Departamento de Genetica e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociencias, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brasil. barghini@iee.usp.br  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0091-6765 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20675268; PMCID:PMC2974685 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2184  
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