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Author LeGates, T.A.; Kvarta, M.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Illuminating a path from light to depression Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Nature Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Nat Neurosci  
  Volume in press Issue Pages (up)  
  Keywords Commentary; Animals; Human Health  
  Abstract Our light environment can strongly influence our mental health. Kai An and colleagues dissect the neuronal circuit mediating depression-related behaviors induced by mistimed light input in mice, implicating the nucleus accumbens as the downstream target of the neural pathway between intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells and the perihabenular nucleus.  
  Address Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1097-6256 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32555525 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3015  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Behn, C.; De Gregorio, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Melatonin Relations with Energy Metabolism as Possibly Involved in Fatal Mountain Road Traffic Accidents Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Molecular Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int J Mol Sci  
  Volume 21 Issue 6 Pages (up)  
  Keywords Review; Human Health; dysrhythmia; melatonin; mountain road death  
  Abstract Previous results evidenced acute exposure to high altitude (HA) weakening the relation between daily melatonin cycle and the respiratory quotient. This review deals with the threat extreme environments pose on body time order, particularly concerning energy metabolism. Working at HA, at poles, or in space challenge our ancestral inborn body timing system. This conflict may also mark many aspects of our current lifestyle, involving shift work, rapid time zone crossing, and even prolonged office work in closed buildings. Misalignments between external and internal rhythms, in the short term, traduce into risk of mental and physical performance shortfalls, mood changes, quarrels, drug and alcohol abuse, failure to accomplish with the mission and, finally, high rates of fatal accidents. Relations of melatonin with energy metabolism being altered under a condition of hypoxia focused our attention on interactions of the indoleamine with redox state, as well as, with autonomic regulations. Individual tolerance/susceptibility to such interactions may hint at adequately dealing with body timing disorders under extreme conditions.  
  Address Laboratory of Extreme Environments, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago 8380453, Chile  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1422-0067 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32235717; PMCID:PMC7139848 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3016  
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Author Rabin, J.; Cha, C.; Nguyen, M.; Renteria, L.; Abebe, F.; Wastani, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cool (blue) vs. warm (yellow) displays enhance visual function Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Eye (London, England) Abbreviated Journal Eye (Lond)  
  Volume in press Issue Pages (up)  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Displays emitting substantial blue light (phones, tablets, computers) can produce eyestrain (computer vision syndrome: CVS) [1, 2]. Yet findings have been challenged [3]. A metric to assess CVS is the highest detectable flicker rate (CFF). We compared the short-term effects of bluish (“cool”) vs. yellowish (“warm”) displays on high temporal frequency contrast sensitivity (TCS), which relates directly to the CFF.  
  Address University of the Incarnate Word Rosenberg School of Optometry, San Antonio, TX, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0950-222X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32029916 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3020  
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Author Paksarian, D.; Rudolph, K.E.; Stapp, E.K.; Dunster, G.P.; He, J.; Mennitt, D.; Hattar, S.; Casey, J.A.; James, P.; Merikangas, K.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Association of Outdoor Artificial Light at Night With Mental Disorders and Sleep Patterns Among US Adolescents Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication JAMA Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal JAMA Psychiatry  
  Volume in press Issue Pages (up)  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Importance: Indoor nighttime light exposure influences sleep and circadian rhythms and is known to affect mood-associated brain circuits in animals. However, little is known about the association between levels of nighttime outdoor light and sleep and mental health in the population, especially among adolescents. Objective: To estimate associations of outdoor artificial light at night (ALAN) with sleep patterns and past-year mental disorder among US adolescents. Design, Setting, and Participants: This population-based, cross-sectional study of US adolescents used the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement, a nationally representative cross-sectional survey conducted from February 2001 through January 2004. A probability sample of adolescents aged 13 to 18 years was included. Analyses were conducted between February 2019 and April 2020. Exposures: Levels of outdoor ALAN, measured by satellite, with means calculated within census block groups. ALAN values were transformed into units of radiance (nW/cm2/sr). Main Outcomes and Measures: Self-reported habitual sleep patterns (weeknight bedtime, weeknight sleep duration, weekend bedtime delay, and weekend oversleep) and past-year mood, anxiety, behavior, and substance use disorders, measured via an in-person structured diagnostic interview. Parent-reported information was included in behavior disorder diagnoses. Results: Among 10123 adolescents (4953 boys [51.3%]; mean [SE] age, 15.2 [0.06] years [weighted]; 6483 for behavior disorder outcomes), ALAN was positively associated with indicators of social disadvantage, such as racial/ethnic minority status (median [IQR] ALAN: white adolescents, 12.96 [30.51] nW/cm2/sr; Hispanic adolescents: 38.54 [47.84] nW/cm2/sr; non-Hispanic black adolescents: 37.39 [51.88] nW/cm2/sr; adolescents of other races/ethnicities: 30.94 [49.93] nW/cm2/sr; P < .001) and lower family income (median [IQR] ALAN by family income-to-poverty ratio </=1.5: 26.76 [52.48] nW/cm2/sr; >6: 21.46 [34.38] nW/cm2/sr; P = .005). After adjustment for several sociodemographic characteristics, as well as area-level population density and socioeconomic status, this study found that higher ALAN levels were associated with later weeknight bedtime, and those in the lowest quartile of ALAN reported the longest weeknight sleep duration. Those in the highest quartile of ALAN went to bed 29 (95% CI, 15-43) minutes later and reported 11 (95% CI, 19-2) fewer minutes of sleep than those in the lowest quartile. ALAN was also positively associated with prevalence of past-year mood and anxiety disorder: each median absolute deviation increase in ALAN was associated with 1.07 (95% CI, 1.00-1.14) times the odds of mood disorder and 1.10 (95% CI, 1.05-1.16) times the odds of anxiety disorder. Further analyses revealed associations with bipolar disorder (odds ratio [OR], 1.19 [95% CI, 1.05-1.35]), specific phobias (OR, 1.18 [95% CI, 1.11-1.26]), and major depressive disorder or dysthymia (OR, 1.07 [95% CI, 1.00-1.15]). Among adolescent girls, differences in weeknight bedtime by ALAN (third and fourth quartiles vs first quartile) were greater with increasing years since menarche (F3, 8.15; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: In this study, area-level outdoor ALAN was associated with less favorable sleep patterns and mood and anxiety disorder in adolescents. Future studies should elucidate whether interventions to reduce exposure to ALAN may positively affect mental and sleep health.  
  Address Genetic Epidemiology Research Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2168-622X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32639562 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3034  
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Author Garcia-Saenz, A.; Sanchez de Miguel, A.; Espinosa, A.; Costas, L.; Aragones, N.; Tonne, C.; Moreno, V.; Perez-Gomez, B.; Valentin, A.; Pollan, M.; Castano-Vinyal, G.; Aube, M.; Kogevinas, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Association between outdoor light-at-night exposure and colorectal cancer in Spain (MCC-Spain study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) Abbreviated Journal Epidemiology  
  Volume in press Issue Pages (up)  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Night shift work, exposure to artificial light-at-night and particularly blue light spectrum, and the consequent circadian disruption may increase the risk of breast and prostate cancer. Colorectal cancer risk may also be increased among night-shift workers. We investigated the association between exposure to artificial light at night according to light spectrum and colorectal cancer among subjects who had never worked at night in a general population case-control study in Spain. METHODS: We examined information on 661 incident histologically verified colorectal cancer cases and 1322 controls from Barcelona and Madrid, 2007-2013. Outdoor artificial light at night exposure was based on images from the International Space Station (ISS) including data on remotely sensed upward light intensity. We derived adjusted odds ratio (OR) estimates and confidence intervals (CI) for visual light, blue light, and spectral sensitivities of the five human photopigments assigned to participant's geocoded longest residence. RESULTS: : Exposure to blue light spectrum was positively associated with colorectal cancer (OR=1.6; 95%CI: 1.2-2.2; highest vs. lowest tertile). ORs were similar (OR=1.7; 95%CI: 1.3-2.3) when further adjusting for area socioeconomic status, diet patterns, smoking, sleep and family history. We observed no association for outdoor visual light (full spectrum) (OR = 1.0, 95%CI 0.7-1.2; highest vs. lowest tertile). Analysis of the five photopigments gave similar results with increased risks for shorter wavelengths overlapping with the blue spectrum and no association for longer wavelengths. CONCLUSIONS: Outdoor blue light spectrum exposure that is increasingly prevalent in recent years may be associated with colorectal cancer risk.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1044-3983 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32639250 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3043  
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