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Author Benke, K.E.; Benke, K.K.; Dimitriadis, C. url  openurl
  Title Spectral content of artificial lighting and effects on health. Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of the Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 30 Issue 3 Pages (up) 13-15  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract There is an increasing body of evidence indicating possible health effects from prolonged exposure to artificial lighting after dark. Both compact fluorescent lights and light emitting diode lamps have a greater proportion of blue light in the emission spectrum than the older incandescent light sources. Exposure to the blue light component at night has been the subject of ongoing research, with a number of published studies linking blue light content to the disruption of the internal body clock, suppression of melatonin production and various ocular effects. Aside from short-term discomfort, possible health effects include long-term chronic illnesses, including cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. A brief review of recent research is provided, salient health issues are noted and discussed, and some examples of exposure minimisation strategies are suggested.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 520  
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Author Rund, S.; O'Donnell, A.; Gentile, J.; Reece, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Daily Rhythms in Mosquitoes and Their Consequences for Malaria Transmission Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Insects Abbreviated Journal Insects  
  Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages (up) 14  
  Keywords Animals; Human Health  
  Abstract The 24-h day involves cycles in environmental factors that impact organismal fitness. This is thought to select for organisms to regulate their temporal biology accordingly, through circadian and diel rhythms. In addition to rhythms in abiotic factors (such as light and temperature), biotic factors, including ecological interactions, also follow daily cycles. How daily rhythms shape, and are shaped by, interactions between organisms is poorly understood. Here, we review an emerging area, namely the causes and consequences of daily rhythms in the interactions between vectors, their hosts and the parasites they transmit. We focus on mosquitoes, malaria parasites and vertebrate hosts, because this system offers the opportunity to integrate from genetic and molecular mechanisms to population dynamics and because disrupting rhythms offers a novel avenue for disease control.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2075-4450 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1421  
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Author Anisimov, V. N. url  openurl
  Title Light desynchronosis and health Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Light & Engineering Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 27 Issue 3 Pages (up) 14-25  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract The review summarizes the modern knowledge of the impact of day-night, light-darkness rhythm disorders on the aging process and on the risk of development of the age-related conditions. Significant evidence has been obtained of that the constant artificial illumination and the daylight of the North has a stimulating effect on the occurrence and development of tumours in laboratory animals. It has been shown that long-term shift work, trans-meridian flights (jet-lag) and insomnia increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, and malignancies in humans. Particular attention is given to the studies where the relationship between light intensity, light wavelength and its ability to suppress the synthesis of melatonin produced at night in the pineal gland, are investigated. It has been established that melatonin synthesis is most effectively suppressed with blue light sources of a wavelength from 446 to 477 nm. The use of exogenous melatonin prevents premature aging of the reproductive system and the body as a whole prevents the development of immune-suppression, metabolic syndrome and tumours caused by light pollution. An urgent task is to develop recommendations for optimizing the illumination of workplaces and residential premises, of cities and towns as a prevention measure for premature aging and age-related pathology, which, ultimately, will contribute to the long-term maintaining of performance and improving the quality of life.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2642  
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Author Mindel, J.W.; Rojas, S.L.; Kline, D.; Bao, S.; Rezai, A.; Corrigan, J.D.; Nelson, R.J.; D, P.; Magalang, U.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title 0038 Sleeping with Low Levels of Artificial Light at Night Increases Systemic Inflammation in Humans Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 42 Issue Supplement_1 Pages (up) A15-A16  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Introduction

Artificial light at night (ALAN) has become a ubiquitous part of our society. Animal studies have shown that ALAN exposure promotes a depressive-like mood and increases peripheral inflammation likely due to circadian disruption. We hypothesized that sleeping with ALAN will increase systemic inflammation in humans.

Methods

We enrolled 64 subjects [32 with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) adherent to treatment and 32 without sleep disorders] in a randomized, crossover study to determine the effects of sleeping with ALAN (40 lux) or the usual dark condition (control) for 7 nights at home. Sleeping with ALAN was confirmed by an actigraph with an ambient light sensor. Outcome measurements were done at baseline and after sleeping in each condition. The primary outcome was changes in the high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels. Secondary outcomes include scores on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire-10 (FOSQ-10), and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS); Psychomotor Vigilance Testing (PVT); actigraphic sleep measures; and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). A random effects linear regression model was used to assess differences adjusting for schedule, visit, and baseline levels. Post-hoc analyses combined results from OSA and non-OSA subjects.

Results

Fifty-eight (30 OSA and 28 non-OSA) subjects, aged 38.4±14.9 years, 33 of whom are male completed the protocol. A log transformation was used so the difference in hsCRP was expressed as a mean ratio. In the combined analysis, the mean hsCRP was 39% higher with ALAN than control (mean ratio=1.39; 95% CI: 1.08-1.80; p=0.012). The effects of ALAN for OSA and non-OSA subjects were not different. ALAN increased the CES-D score by 1.81 (p=0.017) and ESS score by 0.62 (p=0.071) points, and decreased the FOSQ-10 score by 0.36 (p=0.038) points while the PSQI score was unchanged (p=0.860). There were no significant differences in the PVT values, actigraphic sleep measures, or HOMA-IR.

Conclusion

Sleeping with ALAN for seven days significantly increased hsCRP levels and modestly increased depression scores in humans.
 
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  ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2322  
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Author Gall, D. url  openurl
  Title Die Messung circadianer Strahlungsgrößen Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Technische Universität Illmenau Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages (up) 17  
  Keywords Human Health  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 754  
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