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Author Jurić M., Gaiduk M., Seepold R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Influence of Illuminance on Sleep Onset Latency in IoT Based Lighting System Environment. Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Bioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 11495 Issue Pages 429-438  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract The exposure to the light has a great influence on human beings in their everyday life. Various lighting sources produce light that reaches the human eye and influences a rhythmic release of melatonin hormone, that is a sleep promoting factor.

Since the development of new technologies provides more control over illuminance, this work uses an IoT based lighting system to set up dim and bright scenarios. A small study has been performed on the influence of illuminance on sleep latency. The system consists of different light bulbs, sensors and a central bridge which are interconnected like a mesh network. Also, a mobile app has been developed, that allows to adjust the lighting in various rooms. With the help of a ferro-electret sensor, like applied in sleep monitoring systems, a subject’s sleep was monitored. The sensor is placed below the mattress and it collects data, which is stored and processed in a cloud or in other alternative locations.

The research was conducted on healthy young subjects after being previously exposed to the preconfigured illuminance for at least three hours before bedtime. The results indicate correlation between sleep onset latency and exposure to different illuminance before bedtime. In a dimmed environment, the subject fell asleep in average 28% faster compared to the brighter environment.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2555  
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Author Desaulniers, J.; Desjardins, S.; Lapierre, S.; Desgagné, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sleep Environment and Insomnia in Elderly Persons Living at Home Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Aging Research Abbreviated Journal Journal of Aging Research  
  Volume (down) 2018 Issue Pages 1-7  
  Keywords Human Health  
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  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2090-2204 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2016  
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Author Salgado-Delgado, R.; Tapia Osorio, A.; Saderi, N.; Escobar, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Disruption of circadian rhythms: a crucial factor in the etiology of depression Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Depression Research and Treatment Abbreviated Journal Depress Res Treat  
  Volume (down) 2011 Issue Pages 839743  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Circadian factors might play a crucial role in the etiology of depression. It has been demonstrated that the disruption of circadian rhythms by lighting conditions and lifestyle predisposes individuals to a wide range of mood disorders, including impulsivity, mania and depression. Also, associated with depression, there is the impairment of circadian rhythmicity of behavioral, endocrine, and metabolic functions. Inspite of this close relationship between both processes, the complex relationship between the biological clock and the incidence of depressive symptoms is far from being understood. The efficiency and the timing of treatments based on chronotherapy (e.g., light treatment, sleep deprivation, and scheduled medication) indicate that the circadian system is an essential target in the therapy of depression. The aim of the present review is to analyze the biological and clinical data that link depression with the disruption of circadian rhythms, emphasizing the contribution of circadian desynchrony. Therefore, we examine the conditions that may lead to circadian disruption of physiology and behavior as described in depressive states, and, according to this approach, we discuss therapeutic strategies aimed at treating the circadian system and depression.  
  Address Departamento de Biologia Celular y Fisiologia, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04306 Mexico, DF, Mexico  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2090-1321 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21845223; PMCID:PMC3154570 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 524  
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Author Escobar, C.; Salgado-Delgado, R.; Gonzalez-Guerra, E.; Tapia Osorio, A.; Angeles-Castellanos, M.; Buijs, R.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian disruption leads to loss of homeostasis and disease Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Sleep Disorders Abbreviated Journal Sleep Disord  
  Volume (down) 2011 Issue Pages 964510  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract The relevance of a synchronized temporal order for adaptation and homeostasis is discussed in this review. We present evidence suggesting that an altered temporal order between the biological clock and external temporal signals leads to disease. Evidence mainly based on a rodent model of “night work” using forced activity during the sleep phase suggests that altered activity and feeding schedules, out of phase from the light/dark cycle, may be the main cause for the loss of circadian synchrony and disease. It is proposed that by avoiding food intake during sleep hours the circadian misalignment and adverse consequences can be prevented. This review does not attempt to present a thorough revision of the literature, but instead it aims to highlight the association between circadian disruption and disease with special emphasis on the contribution of feeding schedules in circadian synchrony.  
  Address Departamento de Anatomia, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04360 Mexico City, DF, Mexico  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2090-3553 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23471148; PMCID:PMC3581131 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 745  
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Author Kozaki, T.; Hidaka, Y.; Takakura, J.-Y.; Kusano, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Salivary melatonin suppression under 100-Hz flickering blue light and non-flickering blue light conditions Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Neuroscience Letters Abbreviated Journal Neurosci Lett  
  Volume (down) 722 Issue Pages 134857  
  Keywords Human Health; Flickering light; Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cell; Light; Light emitting diode; Melatonin  
  Abstract Bright light at night has been known to suppress melatonin secretion. Photoreceptors, known as intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), project dark/bright information into the superchiasmatic nucleus, which regulates the circadian system. Electroretinograms of ipRGCs show fluctuation that is synchronized with light ON-OFF stimulation. This finding suggests that the flickering condition of light may have an impact on our circadian system. In this study, we evaluate light-induced melatonin suppression under flickering and non-flickering light conditions. Fifteen male subjects between the ages of 20 and 23 years (mean +/- SD, 21.9 +/- 1.9) were exposed to three light conditions (dim, 100-Hz flickering and non-flickering light) from 1:00 a.m. to 2:30 a.m. Saliva samples were taken just before 1:00 and at 1:15, 1:30, 2:00, and 2:30 a.m. Repeated-measure t-test with Bonferroni correction showed a significant decrease in melatonin levels under both 100-Hz and non-flickering light conditions compared to dim light conditions after 2:00 a.m. Moreover, at 2:30 a.m., the rate of change in melatonin level under 100 Hz of flickering light was significantly lower than that under non-flickering light. Our present findings suggest that 100-Hz flickering light may suppress melatonin secretion more than non-flickering light.  
  Address Department of Health and Nutrition Sciences, Nishikyushu University, 4490-9 Osaki, Kanzaki, Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3940 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32097701 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2855  
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