toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Schnitt, S.; Ruhtz, T.; Fischer, J.; Hölker, F.; Kyba, C.C.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Temperature stability of the sky quality meter Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) Abbreviated Journal Sensors (Basel)  
  Volume 13 Issue 9 Pages 12166-12174  
  Keywords *Artifacts; Atmosphere/*analysis; Environmental Monitoring/*instrumentation; Equipment Design; Equipment Failure Analysis; Photometry/*instrumentation; Reproducibility of Results; Sensitivity and Specificity; Temperature; *Transducers; Sky Quality Meter; SQM  
  Abstract The stability of radiance measurements taken by the Sky Quality Meter (SQM)was tested under rapidly changing temperature conditions during exposure to a stable light field in the laboratory. The reported radiance was found to be negatively correlated with temperature, but remained within 7% of the initial reported radiance over a temperature range of -15 degrees C to 35 degrees C, and during temperature changes of -33 degrees C/h and +70 degrees C/h.This is smaller than the manufacturer's quoted unit-to-unit systematic uncertainty of 10%,indicating that the temperature compensation of the SQM is adequate under expected outdoor operating conditions.  
  Address Institute for Space Sciences, Freie Universitat Berlin, Carl-Heinrich-Becker-Weg 6-10, Berlin 12165, Germany. christopher.kyba@wew.fu-berlin.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24030682; PMCID:PMC3821345 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 194  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rabaza, O.; Galadi-Enriquez, D.; Estrella, A.E.; Dols, F.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title All-sky brightness monitoring of light pollution with astronomical methods Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal J Environ Manage  
  Volume 91 Issue 6 Pages 1278-1287  
  Keywords *Astronomy; Calibration; *Environmental Pollutants; *Light  
  Abstract This paper describes a mobile prototype and a protocol to measure light pollution based on astronomical methods. The prototype takes three all-sky images using BVR filters of the Johnson-Cousins astronomical photometric system. The stars are then identified in the images of the Hipparcos and General Catalogue of Photometric Data II astronomical catalogues, and are used as calibration sources. This method permits the measurement of night-sky brightness and facilitates an estimate of which fraction is due to the light up-scattered in the atmosphere by a wide variety of man-made sources. This is achieved by our software, which compares the sky background flux to that of many stars of known brightness. The reduced weight and dimensions of the prototype allow the user to make measurements from virtually any location. This prototype is capable of measuring the sky distribution of light pollution, and also provides an accurate estimate of the background flux at each photometric band.  
  Address Department of Civil Engineering, University of Granada, Severo Ochoa Str. s/n, 18071 Granada, Spain. ovidio@ugr.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20199844 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 192  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cinzano, P.; Falchi, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Quantifying light pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume 139 Issue Pages 13-20  
  Keywords Atmospheric effects; Astronomical site testing; Scattering; Light pollution; Radiative transfer; Night sky brightness; Environmental pollution; Atmospheric pollution Corresponding author contact information  
  Abstract In this paper we review new available indicators useful to quantify and monitor light pollution, defined as the alteration of the natural quantity of light in the night environment due to introduction of manmade light. With the introduction of recent radiative transfer methods for the computation of light pollution propagation, several new indicators become available. These indicators represent a primary step in light pollution quantification, beyond the bare evaluation of the night sky brightness, which is an observational effect integrated along the line of sight and thus lacking the three-dimensional information.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 177  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lowden, A.; Akerstedt, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Assessment of a new dynamic light regimen in a nuclear power control room without windows on quickly rotating shiftworkers--effects on health, wakefulness, and circadian alignment: a pilot study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 29 Issue 5 Pages 641-649  
  Keywords Adaptation, Physiological; Adult; *Circadian Rhythm; Darkness/adverse effects; *Environment, Controlled; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/metabolism; Middle Aged; Photic Stimulation; Pilot Projects; Saliva/chemistry; Sleep/*physiology; *Wakefulness; *Work Schedule Tolerance  
  Abstract The aim of the study was to test whether a new dynamic light regime would improve alertness, sleep, and adaptation to rotating shiftwork. The illumination level in a control room without windows at a nuclear power station was ~200 lux (straight-forward horizontal gaze) using a weak yellow light of 200 lux, 3000 K (Philips Master TLD 36 W 830). New lighting equipment was installed in one area of the control room above the positions of the reactor operators. The new lights were shielded from the control group by a distance of >6 m, and the other operators worked at desks turned away from the new light. The new lights were designed to give three different light exposures: (i) white/blue strong light of 745 lux, 6000 K; (ii) weak yellow light of 650 lux, 4000 K; and (iii) yellow moderate light of 700 lux, 4000 K. In a crossover design, the normal and new light exposures were given during a sequence of three night shifts, two free days, two morning shifts, and one afternoon shift (NNN + MMA), with 7 wks between sessions. The operators consisted of two groups; seven reactor operators from seven work teams were at one time exposed to the new equipment and 16 other operators were used as controls. The study was conducted during winter with reduced opportunities of daylight exposure during work, after night work, or before morning work. Operators wore actigraphs, filled in a sleep/wake diary, including ratings of sleepiness on the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) every 2 h, and provided saliva samples for analysis of melatonin at work (every 2nd h during one night shift and first 3 h during one morning shift). Results from the wake/sleep diary showed the new light treatment increased alertness during the 2nd night shift (interaction group x light x time, p < .01). Time of waking was delayed in the light condition after the 3rd night shift (group x light, p < .05), but the amount of wake time during the sleep span increased after the 2nd night shift (p < .05), also showing a tendency to affect sleep efficiency (p < .10). Effects on circadian phase were difficult to establish given the small sample size and infrequent sampling of saliva melatonin. Nonetheless, it seems that appropriate dynamic light in rooms without windows during the dark Nordic season may promote alertness, sleep, and better adaptation to quickly rotating shiftwork.  
  Address Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. arne.lowden@stress.su.se  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22621361 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 148  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kantermann, T.; Roenneberg, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Is light-at-night a health risk factor or a health risk predictor? Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 26 Issue 6 Pages 1069-1074  
  Keywords *Chronobiology Disorders; Circadian Rhythm; Environmental Exposure; Humans; *Light; Neoplasms; Risk Factors  
  Abstract In 2007, the IARC (WHO) has classified “shift-work that involves circadian disruption” as potentially carcinogenic. Ample evidence leaves no doubt that shift-work is detrimental for health, but the mechanisms behind this effect are not well understood. The hormone melatonin is often considered to be a causal link between night shift and tumor development. The underlying “light-at-night” (LAN) hypothesis is based on the following chain of arguments: melatonin is a hormone produced under the control of the circadian clock at night, and its synthesis can be suppressed by light; as an indolamine, it potentially acts as a scavenger of oxygen radicals, which in turn can damage DNA, which in turn can cause cancer. Although there is no experimental evidence that LAN is at the basis of increased cancer rates in shiftworkers, the scenario “light at night can cause cancer” influences research, medicine, the lighting industry and (via the media) also the general public, well beyond shiftwork. It is even suggested that baby-lights, TVs, computers, streetlights, moonlight, emergency lights, or any so-called “light pollution” by urban developments cause cancer via the mechanisms proposed by the LAN hypothesis. Our commentary addresses the growing concern surrounding light pollution. We revisit the arguments of the LAN theory and put them into perspective regarding circadian physiology, physical likelihood (e.g., what intensities reach the retina), and potential risks, specifically in non-shiftworkers.  
  Address Institute for Medical Psychology, University of Munich LMU, Munich, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:19731106 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 134  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: