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Author Pauley, S.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lighting for the human circadian clock: recent research indicates that lighting has become a public health issue Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Medical Hypotheses Abbreviated Journal Med Hypotheses  
  Volume 63 Issue 4 Pages 588-596  
  Keywords Human Health; Chronobiology Disorders/*complications/*physiopathology; Circadian Rhythm/*radiation effects; Clinical Trials as Topic; Environmental Exposure/adverse effects; Evidence-Based Medicine; Humans; Light; Lighting/*adverse effects/methods; Melatonin/metabolism; *Models, Biological; Neoplasms/*etiology/*physiopathology; Occupational Diseases/etiology/physiopathology; Public Health/methods/trends; Risk Assessment/methods; Risk Factors  
  Abstract The hypothesis that the suppression of melatonin (MLT) by exposure to light at night (LAN) may be one reason for the higher rates of breast and colorectal cancers in the developed world deserves more attention. The literature supports raising this subject for awareness as a growing public health issue. Evidence now exists that indirectly links exposures to LAN to human breast and colorectal cancers in shift workers. The hypothesis begs an even larger question: has medical science overlooked the suppression of MLT by LAN as a contributor to the overall incidence of cancer? The indirect linkage of breast cancer to LAN is further supported by laboratory rat experiments by David E. Blask and colleagues. Experiments involved the implanting of human MCF-7 breast cancer cell xenografts into the groins of rats and measurements were made of cancer cell growth rates, the uptake of linoleic acid (LA), and MLT levels. One group of implanted rats were placed in light-dark (12L:12D) and a second group in light-light (12L:12L) environments. Constant light suppressed MLT, increased cancer cell growth rates, and increased LA uptake into cancer cells. The opposite was seen in the light-dark group. The proposed mechanism is the suppression of nocturnal MLT by exposure to LAN and subsequent lack of protection by MLT on cancer cell receptor sites which allows the uptake of LA which in turn enhances the growth of cancer cells. MLT is a protective, oncostatic hormone and strong antioxidant having evolved in all plants and animals over the millennia. In vertebrates, MLT is normally produced by the pineal gland during the early morning hours of darkness, even in nocturnal animals, and is suppressed by exposure to LAN. Daily entrainment of the human circadian clock is important for good human health. These studies suggest that the proper use and color of indoor and outdoor lighting is important to the health of both humans and ecosystems. Lighting fixtures should be designed to minimize interference with normal circadian rhythms in plants and animals. New discoveries on blue-light-sensitive retinal ganglion cell light receptors that control the circadian clock and how those receptors relate to today's modern high intensity discharge (HID) lamps are discussed. There is a brief discussion of circadian rhythms and light pollution. With the precautionary principle in mind, practical suggestions are offered for better indoor and outdoor lighting practices designed to safeguard human health.  
  Address spauley@cox-internet.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0306-9877 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:15325001 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 792  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Stevens, R.G.; Blask, D.E.; Brainard, G.C.; Hansen, J.; Lockley, S.W.; Provencio, I.; Rea, M.S.; Reinlib, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Meeting report: the role of environmental lighting and circadian disruption in cancer and other diseases Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Environmental Health Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Environ Health Perspect  
  Volume 115 Issue 9 Pages 1357-1362  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; *Circadian Rhythm; Environmental Exposure; Humans; *Lighting/adverse effects; *Neoplasms/etiology; Research; breast cancer; circadian rhythms; clock genes; lighting; melatonin; phototransduction; pineal gland  
  Abstract Light, including artificial light, has a range of effects on human physiology and behavior and can therefore alter human physiology when inappropriately timed. One example of potential light-induced disruption is the effect of light on circadian organization, including the production of several hormone rhythms. Changes in light-dark exposure (e.g., by nonday occupation or transmeridian travel) shift the timing of the circadian system such that internal rhythms can become desynchronized from both the external environment and internally with each other, impairing our ability to sleep and wake at the appropriate times and compromising physiologic and metabolic processes. Light can also have direct acute effects on neuroendocrine systems, for example, in suppressing melatonin synthesis or elevating cortisol production that may have untoward long-term consequences. For these reasons, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences convened a workshop of a diverse group of scientists to consider how best to conduct research on possible connections between lighting and health. According to the participants in the workshop, there are three broad areas of research effort that need to be addressed. First are the basic biophysical and molecular genetic mechanisms for phototransduction for circadian, neuroendocrine, and neurobehavioral regulation. Second are the possible physiologic consequences of disrupting these circadian regulatory processes such as on hormone production, particularly melatonin, and normal and neoplastic tissue growth dynamics. Third are effects of light-induced physiologic disruption on disease occurrence and prognosis, and how prevention and treatment could be improved by application of this knowledge.  
  Address Department of Community Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut 06030-6325, USA. bugs@uchc.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0091-6765 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:17805428; PMCID:PMC1964886 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 821  
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Author Altermatt, F.; Ebert, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reduced flight-to-light behaviour of moth populations exposed to long-term urban light pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Biology Letters Abbreviated Journal Biol Lett  
  Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages 20160111  
  Keywords Lepidoptera; Yponomeuta; adaptation; environmental change; natural selection  
  Abstract The globally increasing light pollution is a well-recognized threat to ecosystems, with negative effects on human, animal and plant wellbeing. The most well-known and widely documented consequence of light pollution is the generally fatal attraction of nocturnal insects to artificial light sources. However, the evolutionary consequences are unknown. Here we report that moth populations from urban areas with high, globally relevant levels of light pollution over several decades show a significantly reduced flight-to-light behaviour compared with populations of the same species from pristine dark-sky habitats. Using a common garden setting, we reared moths from 10 different populations from early-instar larvae and experimentally compared their flight-to-light behaviour under standardized conditions. Moths from urban populations had a significant reduction in the flight-to-light behaviour compared with pristine populations. The reduced attraction to light sources of 'city moths' may directly increase these individuals' survival and reproduction. We anticipate that it comes with a reduced mobility, which negatively affects foraging as well as colonization ability. As nocturnal insects are of eminent significance as pollinators and the primary food source of many vertebrates, an evolutionary change of the flight-to-light behaviour thereby potentially cascades across species interaction networks.  
  Address Department of Environmental Sciences, Zoology, University of Basel, Vesalgasse 1, 4051 Basel, Switzerland  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27072407 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1420  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Li, H.; Wu, M.; Tian, D.; Wu, L.; Niu, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Monitoring and analysis of the expansion of the Ajmr Port, Davao City, Philippines using multi-source remote sensing data Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication PeerJ Abbreviated Journal PeerJ  
  Volume 7 Issue Pages e7512  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Ecological environment; Monitoring; Philippines; Remote sensing; Small ports  
  Abstract Ports have been built or expanded in a number of countries to cater to increasing maritime trade in the 21st century. Port expansion is associated with economic and environmental impacts on the local and regional scales, and these impacts can be studied using remote sensing. The present study presents new results from multi-source remote sensing monitoring of the Ajmr Port expansion. An analysis of land use and vegetation coverage at the port is used to monitor the impact of port construction on the local ecology, while changes in roads, buildings, and lights are used to monitor the economic impact. The results show that: (1) After nine years of expansion, the port area has gradually expanded from the central to the southern coastal area, with an increase of 21.68 hectares during the expansion period. After the expansion, the area of builidings and construction in the study area increased significantly, while the area of water and green areas decreased significantly, indicating that the port construction changed the land use structure of the area. (2) From the perspective of vegetation coverage, the vegetation coverage within 5 km from the port is in good condition. After 9 years, the vegetation coverage in the region between 0.6 and 1 increased from 43.71% to 44.25%, reflecting the higher overall greening level in the region. (3) By analyzing the increase in roads and buildings, it can be seen that the port's comprehensive transportation capacity has improved, the population of the region has increased significantly. As the scale of construction has been continuously expanded , the prosperity as increased. (4) By analyzing the changes in the light index, the light data from the northeast to the southwest in the region is very obvious, and it is clearly located along the coast, indicating that the economic development of the coastal zone is faster than other regions, and the coastal region has promoted the development of the inland region.  
  Address The State Key Laboratory of Remote Sensing Science, Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31489267; PMCID:PMC6705383 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2674  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hong, Y.; Lee, S.; Choi, J.; Jin, Y.; Won, J.; Hong, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Conditional Controlled Light/Dark Cycle Influences Exercise-Induced Benefits in a Rat Model with Osteoarthritis: In Vitro and In Vivo Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Clinical Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Clin Med  
  Volume 8 Issue 11 Pages 1855  
  Keywords Animals; environmental lighting; inflammation; musculoskeletal homeostasis; physical exercise  
  Abstract Physical exercise has long been recommended as a treatment for osteoarthritis (OA), though its effects vary based on the exercise protocol. Here, we examined whether environmental lighting conditions influence the anti-inflammatory benefits of exercise in a rat model of OA. Moderate-intensity treadmill exercise (Ex) was performed for six weeks under a 12:12 h light/dark (L/D) cycle, and compared against rats housed in a 24 h continuous light (L/L) environment. L/L conditions were associated with serological changes shortly after OA induction, which exacerbated the inflammatory microenvironment in the joint. Differentiation capacity was also impaired in bone precursor cells isolated from normal rats maintained under L/L conditions, despite elevated inflammatory responses. Exercise training under L/L conditions led to increased corticosterone levels in the blood, which exacerbated the progression of cartilaginous and synovial lesions. Osteoporotic phenomena were also observed in exercise-trained rats maintained under L/L conditions, along with inflammation-induced catabolism in the gastrocnemius muscle. Aberrant light/dark cycle conditions were also found to be associated with suppression of splenic Cry1 expression in exercise-trained rats, leading to dysregulation of immune responses. Taken together, these data suggest that lighting condition may be an important environmental factor influencing the exercise-induced benefits on OA.  
  Address Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Harvard Medical SchoolBeth Israel, Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215, USA. yonghong@inje.ac.kr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2077-0383 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31684092 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2729  
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