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Author Rabaza, O.; Galadi-Enriquez, D.; Estrella, A.E.; Dols, F.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) All-sky brightness monitoring of light pollution with astronomical methods Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal J Environ Manage  
  Volume 91 Issue 6 Pages 1278-1287  
  Keywords *Astronomy; Calibration; *Environmental Pollutants; *Light  
  Abstract This paper describes a mobile prototype and a protocol to measure light pollution based on astronomical methods. The prototype takes three all-sky images using BVR filters of the Johnson-Cousins astronomical photometric system. The stars are then identified in the images of the Hipparcos and General Catalogue of Photometric Data II astronomical catalogues, and are used as calibration sources. This method permits the measurement of night-sky brightness and facilitates an estimate of which fraction is due to the light up-scattered in the atmosphere by a wide variety of man-made sources. This is achieved by our software, which compares the sky background flux to that of many stars of known brightness. The reduced weight and dimensions of the prototype allow the user to make measurements from virtually any location. This prototype is capable of measuring the sky distribution of light pollution, and also provides an accurate estimate of the background flux at each photometric band.  
  Address Department of Civil Engineering, University of Granada, Severo Ochoa Str. s/n, 18071 Granada, Spain. ovidio@ugr.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20199844 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 192  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kempenaers, B.; Borgstrom, P.; Loes, P.; Schlicht, E.; Valcu, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Artificial night lighting affects dawn song, extra-pair siring success, and lay date in songbirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 20 Issue 19 Pages 1735-1739  
  Keywords Animals; Environmental Pollution; Female; Light; *Lighting; Male; *Reproduction; Sexual Behavior, Animal/*physiology; Songbirds/*physiology; Time Factors; *Vocalization, Animal  
  Abstract Associated with a continued global increase in urbanization, anthropogenic light pollution is an important problem. However, our understanding of the ecological consequences of light pollution is limited. We investigated effects of artificial night lighting on dawn song in five common forest-breeding songbirds. In four species, males near street lights started singing significantly earlier at dawn than males elsewhere in the forest, and this effect was stronger in naturally earlier-singing species. We compared reproductive behavior of blue tits breeding in edge territories with and without street lights to that of blue tits breeding in central territories over a 7 year period. Under the influence of street lights, females started egg laying on average 1.5 days earlier. Males occupying edge territories with street lights were twice as successful in obtaining extra-pair mates than their close neighbors or than males occupying central forest territories. Artificial night lighting affected both age classes but had a stronger effect on yearling males. Our findings indicate that light pollution has substantial effects on the timing of reproductive behavior and on individual mating patterns. It may have important evolutionary consequences by changing the information embedded in previously reliable quality-indicator traits.  
  Address Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard-Gwinner-Strasse, 82319 Seewiesen, Germany. b.kempenaers@orn.mpg.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20850324 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 51  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lowden, A.; Akerstedt, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Assessment of a new dynamic light regimen in a nuclear power control room without windows on quickly rotating shiftworkers--effects on health, wakefulness, and circadian alignment: a pilot study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 29 Issue 5 Pages 641-649  
  Keywords Adaptation, Physiological; Adult; *Circadian Rhythm; Darkness/adverse effects; *Environment, Controlled; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/metabolism; Middle Aged; Photic Stimulation; Pilot Projects; Saliva/chemistry; Sleep/*physiology; *Wakefulness; *Work Schedule Tolerance  
  Abstract The aim of the study was to test whether a new dynamic light regime would improve alertness, sleep, and adaptation to rotating shiftwork. The illumination level in a control room without windows at a nuclear power station was ~200 lux (straight-forward horizontal gaze) using a weak yellow light of 200 lux, 3000 K (Philips Master TLD 36 W 830). New lighting equipment was installed in one area of the control room above the positions of the reactor operators. The new lights were shielded from the control group by a distance of >6 m, and the other operators worked at desks turned away from the new light. The new lights were designed to give three different light exposures: (i) white/blue strong light of 745 lux, 6000 K; (ii) weak yellow light of 650 lux, 4000 K; and (iii) yellow moderate light of 700 lux, 4000 K. In a crossover design, the normal and new light exposures were given during a sequence of three night shifts, two free days, two morning shifts, and one afternoon shift (NNN + MMA), with 7 wks between sessions. The operators consisted of two groups; seven reactor operators from seven work teams were at one time exposed to the new equipment and 16 other operators were used as controls. The study was conducted during winter with reduced opportunities of daylight exposure during work, after night work, or before morning work. Operators wore actigraphs, filled in a sleep/wake diary, including ratings of sleepiness on the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) every 2 h, and provided saliva samples for analysis of melatonin at work (every 2nd h during one night shift and first 3 h during one morning shift). Results from the wake/sleep diary showed the new light treatment increased alertness during the 2nd night shift (interaction group x light x time, p < .01). Time of waking was delayed in the light condition after the 3rd night shift (group x light, p < .05), but the amount of wake time during the sleep span increased after the 2nd night shift (p < .05), also showing a tendency to affect sleep efficiency (p < .10). Effects on circadian phase were difficult to establish given the small sample size and infrequent sampling of saliva melatonin. Nonetheless, it seems that appropriate dynamic light in rooms without windows during the dark Nordic season may promote alertness, sleep, and better adaptation to quickly rotating shiftwork.  
  Address Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. arne.lowden@stress.su.se  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22621361 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 148  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nadis, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Biologists join drive to turn down the lights Type
  Year 2002 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 419 Issue 6910 Pages 868  
  Keywords Ecology; Animal Migration; Animals; Astronomical Phenomena; Astronomy; Biology/*trends; Breast Neoplasms/etiology; Environment; Environmental Pollution/*adverse effects/prevention & control; Female; Humans; Light/*adverse effects; Male; Risk Factors; Vision, Ocular/physiology  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:12410271 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 787  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Savvidis, C.; Koutsilieris, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Circadian rhythm disruption in cancer biology Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Molecular Medicine (Cambridge, Mass.) Abbreviated Journal Mol Med  
  Volume 18 Issue Pages 1249-1260  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; CLOCK Proteins/genetics/metabolism; Circadian Clocks/genetics; *Circadian Rhythm/genetics; Environment; Humans; Melatonin/metabolism; Neoplasms/genetics/pathology/*physiopathology/therapy  
  Abstract Circadian rhythms show universally a 24-h oscillation pattern in metabolic, physiological and behavioral functions of almost all species. This pattern is due to a fundamental adaptation to the rotation of Earth around its own axis. Molecular mechanisms of generation of circadian rhythms organize a biochemical network in suprachiasmatic nucleus and peripheral tissues, building cell autonomous clock pacemakers. Rhythmicity is observed in transcriptional expression of a wide range of clock-controlled genes that regulate a variety of normal cell functions, such as cell division and proliferation. Desynchrony of this rhythmicity seems to be implicated in several pathologic conditions, including tumorigenesis and progression of cancer. In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) categorized “shiftwork that involves circadian disruption [as] probably carcinogenic to humans” (Group 2A in the IARC classification system of carcinogenic potency of an agentagent) (Painting, Firefighting, and Shiftwork; IARC; 2007). This review discusses the potential relation between disruptions of normal circadian rhythms with genetic driving machinery of cancer. Elucidation of the role of clockwork disruption, such as exposure to light at night and sleep disruption, in cancer biology could be important in developing new targeted anticancer therapies, optimizing individualized chronotherapy and modifying lighting environment in workplaces or homes.  
  Address Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hippocration General Hospital, Athens, Greece. csavvidis@med.uoa.gr  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1076-1551 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22811066; PMCID:PMC3521792 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 514  
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