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Author Rabaza, O.; Galadi-Enriquez, D.; Estrella, A.E.; Dols, F.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title All-sky brightness monitoring of light pollution with astronomical methods Type Journal Article
  Year (up) 2010 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal J Environ Manage  
  Volume 91 Issue 6 Pages 1278-1287  
  Keywords *Astronomy; Calibration; *Environmental Pollutants; *Light  
  Abstract This paper describes a mobile prototype and a protocol to measure light pollution based on astronomical methods. The prototype takes three all-sky images using BVR filters of the Johnson-Cousins astronomical photometric system. The stars are then identified in the images of the Hipparcos and General Catalogue of Photometric Data II astronomical catalogues, and are used as calibration sources. This method permits the measurement of night-sky brightness and facilitates an estimate of which fraction is due to the light up-scattered in the atmosphere by a wide variety of man-made sources. This is achieved by our software, which compares the sky background flux to that of many stars of known brightness. The reduced weight and dimensions of the prototype allow the user to make measurements from virtually any location. This prototype is capable of measuring the sky distribution of light pollution, and also provides an accurate estimate of the background flux at each photometric band.  
  Address Department of Civil Engineering, University of Granada, Severo Ochoa Str. s/n, 18071 Granada, Spain. ovidio@ugr.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20199844 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 192  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Romano, M.C.; Rodas, A.Z.; Valdez, R.A.; Hernandez, S.E.; Galindo, F.; Canales, D.; Brousset, D.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Stress in wildlife species: noninvasive monitoring of glucocorticoids Type Journal Article
  Year (up) 2010 Publication Neuroimmunomodulation Abbreviated Journal Neuroimmunomodulation  
  Volume 17 Issue 3 Pages 209-212  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Animals, Wild/immunology/*metabolism; Animals, Zoo/immunology/*metabolism; Cetacea/immunology/metabolism; Depressive Disorder/metabolism/physiopathology; Ecosystem; Environment; Feces/chemistry; Felidae/immunology/metabolism; Glucocorticoids/*analysis/*metabolism; Housing, Animal; Primates/immunology/metabolism; Radioimmunoassay/methods; Social Behavior; Stress, Psychological/*diagnosis/*metabolism/physiopathology; Testosterone/analysis/metabolism  
  Abstract Depression and stress are related pathologies extensively studied in humans. However, this relationship is not well known in animals kept in zoos and even less known in wild animals. In zoo animals, acute and chronic stress caused by difficulties in coping with stressors such as public presence and noise, among others, can induce the appearance of repetitive pathological behaviors such as stereotypies, many times associated with organic pathologies that deeply affect their health and welfare. In the wild, factors such as deforestation, habitat fragmentation, lack of food and water, and human disturbances are potential causes of acute and chronic stress for the resident fauna. Glucocorticoids (GC) have been extensively used as stress indicators in many species including humans. Since chase and handling of wild animals immediately raise their GC serum levels, noninvasive methods have been developed to assess stress without interference caused by sample collection. The hormones and their metabolites can be measured in various body fluids and excreta and detect basal feedback free hormone concentrations as well as the response to ACTH and handling. In order to study the influence of disturbing factors we have measured GC as stress indicators by noninvasive techniques in dolphins and felids (ocelots, jaguarundis and margays) and cortisol and testosterone in spider monkeys.  
  Address Departamento de Fisiologia, Biofisica y Neurociencias, CINVESTAV-IPN, Mexico, Mexico. mromano@fisio.cinvestav.mx  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1021-7401 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20134205 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 585  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Ruhtz, T.; Fischer, J.; Hölker, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cloud coverage acts as an amplifier for ecological light pollution in urban ecosystems Type Journal Article
  Year (up) 2011 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 6 Issue 3 Pages e17307  
  Keywords Berlin; *Cities; *Ecosystem; Environmental Pollution/*adverse effects/analysis; *Light; Seasons; *Weather  
  Abstract The diurnal cycle of light and dark is one of the strongest environmental factors for life on Earth. Many species in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems use the level of ambient light to regulate their metabolism, growth, and behavior. The sky glow caused by artificial lighting from urban areas disrupts this natural cycle, and has been shown to impact the behavior of organisms, even many kilometers away from the light sources. It could be hypothesized that factors that increase the luminance of the sky amplify the degree of this “ecological light pollution”. We show that cloud coverage dramatically amplifies the sky luminance, by a factor of 10.1 for one location inside of Berlin and by a factor of 2.8 at 32 km from the city center. We also show that inside of the city overcast nights are brighter than clear rural moonlit nights, by a factor of 4.1. These results have important implications for choronobiological and chronoecological studies in urban areas, where this amplification effect has previously not been considered.  
  Address Institute for Space Sciences, Freie Universitat Berlin, Berlin, Germany. christopher.kyba@wew.fu-berlin.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21399694; PMCID:PMC3047560 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 20  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chen, X.; Nordhaus, W.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Using luminosity data as a proxy for economic statistics Type Journal Article
  Year (up) 2011 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A  
  Volume 108 Issue 21 Pages 8589-8594  
  Keywords Developing Countries/history/*statistics & numerical data; *Extraterrestrial Environment; History, 20th Century; History, 21st Century; *Light; Methods; *Research Design; Socioeconomic Factors/*history  
  Abstract A pervasive issue in social and environmental research has been how to improve the quality of socioeconomic data in developing countries. Given the shortcomings of standard sources, the present study examines luminosity (measures of nighttime lights visible from space) as a proxy for standard measures of output (gross domestic product). We compare output and luminosity at the country level and at the 1 degrees latitude x 1 degrees longitude grid-cell level for the period 1992-2008. We find that luminosity has informational value for countries with low-quality statistical systems, particularly for those countries with no recent population or economic censuses.  
  Address Department of Economics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. xi.chen@yale.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21576474; PMCID:PMC3102367 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 122  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author den Outer, P.; Lolkema, D.; Haaima, M.; van der Hoff, R.; Spoelstra, H.; Schmidt, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Intercomparisons of nine sky brightness detectors Type Journal Article
  Year (up) 2011 Publication Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) Abbreviated Journal Sensors (Basel)  
  Volume 11 Issue 10 Pages 9603-9612  
  Keywords Calibration; Darkness; *Extraterrestrial Environment; Humans; Light; Luminescent Measurements; Netherlands; *Optical Phenomena; Optics and Photonics/*instrumentation/*methods; Sky Quality Meter; artificial lighting; intercalibration; intercomparison; light pollution; night sky brightness  
  Abstract Nine Sky Quality Meters (SQMs) have been intercompared during a night time measurement campaign held in the Netherlands in April 2011. Since then the nine SQMs have been distributed across The Netherlands and form the Dutch network for monitoring night sky brightness. The goal of the intercomparison was to infer mutual calibration factors and obtain insight into the variability of the SQMs under different meteorological situations. An ensemble average is built from the individual measurements and used as a reference to infer the mutual calibration factors. Data required additional synchronization prior to the calibration determination, because the effect of moving clouds combined with small misalignments emerges as time jitter in the measurements. Initial scatter of the individual instruments lies between +/-14%. Individual night time sums range from -16% to +20%. Intercalibration reduces this to 0.5%, and -7% to +9%, respectively. During the campaign the smallest luminance measured was 0.657 +/- 0.003 mcd/m(2) on 12 April, and the largest value was 5.94 +/- 0.03 mcd/m(2) on 2 April. During both occurrences interfering circumstances like snow cover or moonlight were absent.  
  Address National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, A. van Leeuwenhoeklaan 9, 3720 BA Bilthoven, The Netherlands. peter.den.outer@rivm.nl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22163715; PMCID:PMC3231263 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 196  
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