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Author Longcore, T.; Rodriguez, A.; Witherington, B.; Penniman, J.F.; Herf, L.; Herf, M.
Title Rapid assessment of lamp spectrum to quantify ecological effects of light at night Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol
Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 511-521
Keywords Lighting; Ecology; Animals; Vision
Abstract For many decades, the spectral composition of lighting was determined by the type of lamp, which also influenced potential effects of outdoor lights on species and ecosystems. Light-emitting diode (LED) lamps have dramatically increased the range of spectral profiles of light that is economically viable for outdoor lighting. Because of the array of choices, it is necessary to develop methods to predict the effects of different spectral profiles without conducting field studies, especially because older lighting systems are being replaced rapidly. We describe an approach to predict responses of exemplar organisms and groups to lamps of different spectral output by calculating an index based on action spectra from behavioral or visual characteristics of organisms and lamp spectral irradiance. We calculate relative response indices for a range of lamp types and light sources and develop an index that identifies lamps that minimize predicted effects as measured by ecological, physiological, and astronomical indices. Using these assessment metrics, filtered yellow-green and amber LEDs are predicted to have lower effects on wildlife than high pressure sodium lamps, while blue-rich lighting (e.g., K >/= 2200) would have greater effects. The approach can be updated with new information about behavioral or visual responses of organisms and used to test new lighting products based on spectrum. Together with control of intensity, direction, and duration, the approach can be used to predict and then minimize the adverse effects of lighting and can be tailored to individual species or taxonomic groups.
Address (down) f.lux Software LLC, Los Angeles, California
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29894022 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1940
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Author Kuhn, L.; Johansson, M.; Laike, T.; Goven, T.
Title Residents' perceptions following retrofitting of residential area outdoor lighting with LEDs Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research and Technology
Volume 45 Issue 5 Pages 568-584
Keywords *Lighting; outdoor lighting; LED; light emitting diode; lighting levels; public opinion
Abstract The use of light emitting diodes (LEDs) in outdoor lighting has energy-saving potential, but users’ responses to this light source are largely unknown. An intervention study in two residential areas compared conventional lighting installations (high pressure sodium in Area 1 and high pressure mercury in Area 2) to a retrofitted LED-alternative regarding residents’ perceptions of quality of light, visual accessibility and danger. Moreover, energy use was calculated. Residents’ (N = 60) visual accessibility improved and perceived danger remained low in both areas after retrofitting. In Area 2 the perceived quality of light increased, whereas in Area 1 the results were mixed. The retrofitted application reduced energy use by 41–76% and might be a feasible alternative to conventional outdoor lighting in relatively safe areas.
Address (down) Environmental Psychology, Department of Architecture and Built Environment, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 280
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Author Johansson, M.; Rosen, M.; Kuller, R.
Title Individual factors influencing the assessment of the outdoor lighting of an urban footpath Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research and Technology
Volume 43 Issue 1 Pages 31-43
Keywords footpath lighting; pathway lighting; outdoor lighting; lighting perception
Abstract During the hours of darkness, the mobility of young women, the elderly and the disabled is limited in urban areas. In a field study possible predictors of the perceived visual accessibility and the perceived danger of an urban footpath were investigated. Eighty-one people individually walked along the footpath after dark. They subjectively assessed the environment and answered a questionnaire about personality and socio-demographics. Visual accessibility was predicted by visual field, environmental trust and brightness. Danger was predicted by the pleasantness of the lighting, gender, brightness and environmental trust. Consequently, the influence of individual characteristics, including the subjective judgments of brightness and hedonic tone and the personality dimension of trust in the physical environment, should be considered in the design of exterior lighting for urban footpaths.
Address (down) Environmental Psychology, Department of Architecture and Built Environment Lund University, Sweden
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 334
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Author Gaston, K.J.
Title Sustainability: A green light for efficiency Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume 497 Issue 7451 Pages 560-561
Keywords Editorial; Animals; Atmosphere/chemistry; Carbon Dioxide/analysis; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Conservation of Energy Resources/economics/*methods/*trends; Global Warming/prevention & control; Humans; Lighting/*economics/instrumentation/statistics & numerical data/*trends; Public Health
Abstract
Address (down) Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, UK. k.j.gaston@exeter.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23719447 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 459
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Author Gaston, K.J.; Bennie, J.
Title Demographic effects of artificial nighttime lighting on animal populations Type Book Chapter
Year 2014 Publication Environmental Reviews Abbreviated Journal Environ. Rev.
Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 323-330
Keywords diurnal; lighting; night; nocturnal; light pollution; light at night; Photoperiodism; demography; demographics; population dynamics
Abstract Artificial lighting, especially but not exclusively through street lights, has transformed the nighttime environment in much of the world. Impacts have been identified across multiple levels of biological organization and process. The influences, however, on population dynamics, particularly through the combined effects on the key demographic rates (immigration, births, deaths, emigration) that determine where individual species occur and in what numbers, have not previously been well characterized. The majority of attention explicitly on demographic parameters to date has been placed on the attraction of organisms to lights, and thus effectively local immigration, the large numbers of individuals that can be involved, and then to some extent the mortality that can often result. Some of the most important influences of nighttime lighting, however, are likely more subtle and less immediately apparent to the human observer. Particularly significant are effects of nighttime lighting on demography that act through (i) circadian clocks and photoperiodism and thence on birth rates; (ii) time partitioning and thence on death rates; and (iii) immigration/emigration through constraining the movements of individuals amongst habitat networks, especially as a consequence of continuously lit linear features such as roads and footpaths. Good model organisms are required to enable the relative consequences of such effects to be effectively determined, and a wider consideration of the effects of artificial light at night is needed in demographic studies across a range of species.
Address (down) Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9EZ, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Canadian Science Publishing Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1181-8700 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 317
Permanent link to this record