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Author (down) Souman, J.L.; Borra, T.; de Goijer, I.; Schlangen, L.J.M.; Vlaskamp, B.N.S.; Lucassen, M.P.
Title Spectral Tuning of White Light Allows for Strong Reduction in Melatonin Suppression without Changing Illumination Level or Color Temperature Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms
Volume 33 Issue 4 Pages 420-431
Keywords Human Health; Lighting
Abstract Studies with monochromatic light stimuli have shown that the action spectrum for melatonin suppression exhibits its highest sensitivity at short wavelengths, around 460 to 480 nm. Other studies have demonstrated that filtering out the short wavelengths from white light reduces melatonin suppression. However, this filtering of short wavelengths was generally confounded with reduced light intensity and/or changes in color temperature. Moreover, it changed the appearance from white light to yellow/orange, rendering it unusable for many practical applications. Here, we show that selectively tuning a polychromatic white light spectrum, compensating for the reduction in spectral power between 450 and 500 nm by enhancing power at even shorter wavelengths, can produce greatly different effects on melatonin production, without changes in illuminance or color temperature. On different evenings, 15 participants were exposed to 3 h of white light with either low or high power between 450 and 500 nm, and the effects on salivary melatonin levels and alertness were compared with those during a dim light baseline. Exposure to the spectrum with low power between 450 and 500 nm, but high power at even shorter wavelengths, did not suppress melatonin compared with dim light, despite a large difference in illuminance (175 vs. <5 lux). In contrast, exposure to the spectrum with high power between 450 and 500 nm (also 175 lux) resulted in almost 50% melatonin suppression. For alertness, no significant differences between the 3 conditions were observed. These results open up new opportunities for lighting applications that allow for the use of electrical lighting without disturbance of melatonin production.
Address Philips Lighting Research, Department Lighting Applications, Eindhoven, The Netherlands
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29984614 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1985
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Author (down) Solano Lamphar, H.A.; Kocifaj, M.
Title Light pollution in ultraviolet and visible spectrum: effect on different visual perceptions Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 8 Issue 2 Pages e56563
Keywords Lighting; Animals; *Environmental Pollution; Humans; Insects; Light; Lighting/*adverse effects; Models, Theoretical; *Visual Perception
Abstract In general terms, lighting research has been focused in the development of artificial light with the purpose of saving energy and having more durable lamps. However, the consequences that artificial night lighting could bring to the human being and living organisms have become an important issue recently. Light pollution represents a significant problem to both the environment and human health causing a disruption of biological rhythms related not only to the visible spectrum, but also to other parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. Since the lamps emit across a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum, all photobiological species may be exposed to another type of light pollution. By comparing five different lamps, the present study attempts to evaluate UV radiative fluxes relative to what humans and two species of insects perceive as sky glow level. We have analyzed three atmospheric situations: clear sky, overcast sky and evolving precipitable water content. One important finding suggests that when a constant illuminance of urban spaces has to be guaranteed the sky glow from the low pressure sodium lamps has the most significant effect to the visual perception of the insects tested. But having the fixed number of luminaires the situation changes and the low pressure sodium lamp would be the best choice for all three species. The sky glow effects can be interpreted correctly only if the lamp types and the required amount of scotopic luxes at the ground are taken into account simultaneously. If these two factors are combined properly, then the ecological consequences of sky glow can be partly reduced. The results of this research may be equally useful for lighting engineers, architects, biologists and researchers who are studying the effects of sky glow on humans and biodiversity.
Address ICA, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovak Republic. lamphar@gmail.com
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23441205; PMCID:PMC3575508 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 578
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Author (down) Snyder, J.D.; Bullough, J.D.; Radetsky, L.C.
Title Innovative Roadway Light Source and Dye Combinations to Improve Visibility and Reduce Environmental Impacts. Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication National Technical Information Service report Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Lighting Systems
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 444
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Author (down) Smith, M.R.; Revell, V.L.; Eastman, C.I.
Title Phase advancing the human circadian clock with blue-enriched polychromatic light Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Med
Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages 287-294
Keywords Adult; Circadian Rhythm/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; *Light; Lighting/*methods; Male; Melatonin/metabolism; Phototherapy/*methods; Sleep; Wakefulness; Young Adult; blue light; sleep
Abstract BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that the human circadian system is maximally sensitive to short-wavelength (blue) light. Whether this sensitivity can be utilized to increase the size of phase shifts using light boxes and protocols designed for practical settings is not known. We assessed whether bright polychromatic lamps enriched in the short-wavelength portion of the visible light spectrum could produce larger phase advances than standard bright white lamps. METHODS: Twenty-two healthy young adults received either a bright white or bright blue-enriched 2-h phase advancing light pulse upon awakening on each of four treatment days. On the first treatment day the light pulse began 8h after the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO), on average about 2h before baseline wake time. On each subsequent day, light treatment began 1h earlier than the previous day, and the sleep schedule was also advanced. RESULTS: Phase advances of the DLMO for the blue-enriched (92+/-78 min, n=12) and white groups (76+/-45 min, n=10) were not significantly different. CONCLUSION: Bright blue-enriched polychromatic light is no more effective than standard bright light therapy for phase advancing circadian rhythms at commonly used therapeutic light levels.
Address Biological Rhythms Research Laboratory, Rush University Medical Center, Suite 425, 1645 W. Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:18805055; PMCID:PMC2723863 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 289
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Author (down) Smith, M.
Title Time to turn off the lights Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume 457 Issue 7225 Pages 27
Keywords Editorial; Animal Migration/radiation effects; Animals; Astronomy/trends; Conservation of Energy Resources/economics/trends; *Darkness; Environmental Pollution/*adverse effects/economics/*prevention & control; Equipment Design/trends; Humans; Lighting/*adverse effects/economics
Abstract
Address Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena, Chile. msmith@ctio.noao.edu
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19122621 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 466
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