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Author (down) Sella, K.N.; Salmon, M.; Witherington, B.E.
Title Filtered Streetlights Attract Hatchling Marine Turtles Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Chelonian Conservation and Biology Abbreviated Journal Chelonian Conservation and Biology
Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 255-261
Keywords Reptilia; Testudines; Cheloniidae; Loggerhead turtle; turtles; marine turtles; reptiles; Caretta caretta; Chelonia mydas; hatchlings; artificial lighting; light “trapping”; orientation; seafinding; Florida
Abstract On many nesting beaches, hatchling marine turtles are exposed to poled street lighting that disrupts their ability to crawl to the sea. Experiments were done to determine how hatchlings responded to street lighting transmitted through 2 filters that excluded the most disruptive wavelengths (those <&#8201;530 nm; those <&#8201;570 nm). Filtered lighting, however, also attracted the turtles though not as strongly as an unfiltered (high-pressure sodium vapor) lighting. Filtering is therefore of limited utility for light management, especially since other alternatives (such as lowering, shielding, or turning off unnecessary lighting; use of dimmer lights embedded in roadways) are more effective.
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ISSN 1071-8443 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 78
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Author (down) Sȩdziwy, A.; Basiura, A.; Wojnicki, I.
Title Roadway Lighting Retrofit: Environmental and Economic Impact of Greenhouse Gases Footprint Reduction Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability
Volume 10 Issue 11 Pages 3925
Keywords Economics; Lighting
Abstract Roadway lighting retrofit is a process continuously developed in urban environments due to both installation aging and technical upgrades. The spectacular example is replacing the high intensity discharge (HID) lamps, usually high pressure sodium (HPS) ones, with the sources based on light-emitting diodes (LED). The main focus in the related research was put on energy efficiency of installations and corresponding financial benefits. In this work, we extend those considerations analyzing how lighting optimization impacts greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction and what are the resultant financial benefits expressed in terms of emission allowances prices. Our goal is twofold: (i) obtaining a quantitative assessment of how a GHG footprint depends on a technological scope of modernization of a city HPS-based lighting system; and (ii) showing that the costs of such a modernization can be decreased by up to 10% thanks to a lowered CO 2 emission volume. Moreover, we identify retrofit patterns yielding the most substantial environmental impact.
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ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2772
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Author (down) Scott, R.
Title THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ROAD LIGHTING QUALITY AND ACCIDENT FREQUENCY – TRRL LABORATORY REPORT 929. Type Journal Article
Year 1980 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Lighting; quality; accident rate; accident; frequency; luminance; glare; uniformity; urban area; daylight; darkness; surfacing; pedestrian
Abstract many studies have related changes in accident frequency to the presence of street lighting, and a few have examined its variation over a range of lighting quality, as measured by illuminance. this investigation attempts to find which of several measures of lighting (describing quantity – as represented by luminance or illuminance – uniformity and glare) most clearly explain variations in accident frequency. about 100 lit sites, almost all in built-up areas, were measured for lighting quality in dry-road conditions. the lighting variables measured were related to the dark:day ratios of accident frequency for the same sites. the strongest relationship found was that for average road surface luminance: in the range 0.5-2.0 candelas/m2, it is estimated that an increase of 1 cd/m2 is associated with a 35 per cent lower accident ratio. other measures of luminance and illuminance were also found to be related to accident ratio (and to each other), but not as clearly as was average road luminance, which is therefore the preferred explanatory variable. analysis of pedestrian and non-pedestrian accidents separately did not reveal a relationship between the former and lighting quality. in contrast, non-pedestrian accidents showed similar relationships to those for all accidents, with the addition of a possible relationship with overall uniformity of luminance.(a)
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Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 647
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Author (down) Schulte-Römer, N.; Meier, J.; Söding, M.; Dannemann, E.
Title The LED Paradox: How Light Pollution Challenges Experts to Reconsider Sustainable Lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability
Volume 11 Issue 21 Pages 6160
Keywords Energy; Lighting; Society
Abstract In the 21st century, the notion of “sustainable lighting” is closely associated with LED technology. In the past ten years, municipalities and private light users worldwide have installed light-emitting diodes in urban spaces and public streets to save energy. Yet an increasing body of interdisciplinary research suggests that supposedly sustainable LED installations are in fact unsustainable, because they increase light pollution. Paradoxically, blue-rich cool-white LED lighting, which is the most energy-efficient, also appears to be the most ecologically unfriendly. Biologists, physicians and ecologists warn that blue-rich LED light disturbs the circadian day-and-night rhythm of living organisms, including humans, with potential negative health effects on individual species and whole ecosystems. Can the paradox be solved? This paper explores this question based on our transdisciplinary research project Light Pollution—A Global Discussion. It reveals how light pollution experts and lighting professionals see the challenges and potential of LED lighting from their different viewpoints. This expert feedback shows that “sustainable LED lighting” goes far beyond energy efficiency as it raises complex design issues that imply stakeholder negotiation. It also suggests that the LED paradox may be solved in context, but hardly in principle.
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ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2824
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Author (down) Schulte-Römer, N.; Meier, J.; Dannemann, E.; Söding, M.
Title Lighting Professionals versus Light Pollution Experts? Investigating Views on an Emerging Environmental Concern Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability
Volume 11 Issue 6 Pages 1696
Keywords Lighting; Society
Abstract Concerns about the potential negative effects of artificial light at night on humans, flora and fauna, were originally raised by astronomers and environmentalists. Yet, we observe a growing interest in what is called light pollution among the general public and in the lighting field. Although lighting professionals are often critical of calling light ‘pollution’, they increasingly acknowledge the problem and are beginning to act accordingly. Are those who illuminate joining forces with those who take a critical stance towards artificial light at night? We explore this question in more detail based on the results of a non-representative worldwide expert survey. In our analysis, we distinguish between “lighting professionals” with occupational backgrounds linked to lighting design and the lighting industry, and “light pollution experts” with mostly astronomy- and environment-related professional backgrounds, and explore their opposing and shared views vis-à-vis issues of light pollution. Our analysis reveals that despite seemingly conflicting interests, lighting professionals and light pollution experts largely agree on the problem definition and problem-solving approaches. However, we see diverging views regarding potential obstacles to light pollution mitigation and associated governance challenges.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2278
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