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Author Blood, W.H.
Title What is street lighting? Type Journal Article
Year 1907 Publication Transactions of the Illuminating Engineering Society Abbreviated Journal
Volume 2 Issue Pages (down) 633-644
Keywords Lighting; History
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2742
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Author Spur, M.; Houel, N.; Tourre, V.
Title Visualizing Multilayered Geospatial Data In Virtual Reality To Assess Public Lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication ISPRS – International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci.
Volume Xliii-B4-2020 Issue Pages (down) 623-630
Keywords Lighting; Instrumentation; Vision
Abstract With the improvement and proliferation of virtual reality devices, their use for research and professional activity is broadening,fostering the advent of the field of immersive analytics, as is their acceptance among consumers. Other than the heightened sense of immersion into visualized data they provide, they also make displays of much larger apparent size and different positioning practical than what would be possible otherwise. Drawing on these benefits, we implemented a development of Multiple and Coordinated Displays (MCVs) for geovisualization that stacks different layers of data above each other, tilted for legibility. In a formal experiment, we evaluated it and two other, comparable MCV methods implemented in VR for their usefulness in analyzing public perception and soliciting public feedback regarding urban street lighting. In that field, the direction has recently been shifting from purely systemic development to a participatory approach, thus our investigation was into how a system like this could facilitate participation that can yield actionable results. Previous analysis of interaction data and usability questionnaires reveals preferences for certain systems depending on user characteristics, with the stack system showing a slight advantage over a grid of layers and especially over temporal multiplexing. We show that regardless of MCV variation, participants were able to analyze and provide feedback on public lighting situations that can directly contribute to urbanist work. The MCV approach further aided in understanding their choices, as eye-tracking allowed us to analyze attention to individual data layers.
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ISSN 2194-9034 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3105
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Author West, K.E.; Jablonski, M.R.; Warfield, B.; Cecil, K.S.; James, M.; Ayers, M.A.; Maida, J.; Bowen, C.; Sliney, D.H.; Rollag, M.D.; Hanifin, J.P.; Brainard, G.C.
Title Blue light from light-emitting diodes elicits a dose-dependent suppression of melatonin in humans Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) Abbreviated Journal J Appl Physiol (1985)
Volume 110 Issue 3 Pages (down) 619-626
Keywords Circadian Rhythm/*physiology/*radiation effects; Color; Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation; Humans; Lighting/*methods; Melatonin/*blood; Metabolic Clearance Rate/radiation effects; Photic Stimulation/*methods; Radiation Dosage; Retina/*physiology/*radiation effects; Semiconductors; Young Adult; blue light
Abstract Light suppresses melatonin in humans, with the strongest response occurring in the short-wavelength portion of the spectrum between 446 and 477 nm that appears blue. Blue monochromatic light has also been shown to be more effective than longer-wavelength light for enhancing alertness. Disturbed circadian rhythms and sleep loss have been described as risk factors for astronauts and NASA ground control workers, as well as civilians. Such disturbances can result in impaired alertness and diminished performance. Prior to exposing subjects to short-wavelength light from light-emitting diodes (LEDs) (peak lambda = 469 nm; 1/2 peak bandwidth = 26 nm), the ocular safety exposure to the blue LED light was confirmed by an independent hazard analysis using the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists exposure limits. Subsequently, a fluence-response curve was developed for plasma melatonin suppression in healthy subjects (n = 8; mean age of 23.9 +/- 0.5 years) exposed to a range of irradiances of blue LED light. Subjects with freely reactive pupils were exposed to light between 2:00 and 3:30 AM. Blood samples were collected before and after light exposures and quantified for melatonin. The results demonstrate that increasing irradiances of narrowband blue-appearing light can elicit increasing plasma melatonin suppression in healthy subjects (P < 0.0001). The data were fit to a sigmoidal fluence-response curve (R(2) = 0.99; ED(50) = 14.19 muW/cm(2)). A comparison of mean melatonin suppression with 40 muW/cm(2) from 4,000 K broadband white fluorescent light, currently used in most general lighting fixtures, suggests that narrow bandwidth blue LED light may be stronger than 4,000 K white fluorescent light for suppressing melatonin.
Address Dept. of Neurology, Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107, USA
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0161-7567 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21164152 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 287
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Author Pauley, S.M.
Title Lighting for the human circadian clock: recent research indicates that lighting has become a public health issue Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication Medical Hypotheses Abbreviated Journal Med Hypotheses
Volume 63 Issue 4 Pages (down) 588-596
Keywords Human Health; Chronobiology Disorders/*complications/*physiopathology; Circadian Rhythm/*radiation effects; Clinical Trials as Topic; Environmental Exposure/adverse effects; Evidence-Based Medicine; Humans; Light; Lighting/*adverse effects/methods; Melatonin/metabolism; *Models, Biological; Neoplasms/*etiology/*physiopathology; Occupational Diseases/etiology/physiopathology; Public Health/methods/trends; Risk Assessment/methods; Risk Factors
Abstract The hypothesis that the suppression of melatonin (MLT) by exposure to light at night (LAN) may be one reason for the higher rates of breast and colorectal cancers in the developed world deserves more attention. The literature supports raising this subject for awareness as a growing public health issue. Evidence now exists that indirectly links exposures to LAN to human breast and colorectal cancers in shift workers. The hypothesis begs an even larger question: has medical science overlooked the suppression of MLT by LAN as a contributor to the overall incidence of cancer? The indirect linkage of breast cancer to LAN is further supported by laboratory rat experiments by David E. Blask and colleagues. Experiments involved the implanting of human MCF-7 breast cancer cell xenografts into the groins of rats and measurements were made of cancer cell growth rates, the uptake of linoleic acid (LA), and MLT levels. One group of implanted rats were placed in light-dark (12L:12D) and a second group in light-light (12L:12L) environments. Constant light suppressed MLT, increased cancer cell growth rates, and increased LA uptake into cancer cells. The opposite was seen in the light-dark group. The proposed mechanism is the suppression of nocturnal MLT by exposure to LAN and subsequent lack of protection by MLT on cancer cell receptor sites which allows the uptake of LA which in turn enhances the growth of cancer cells. MLT is a protective, oncostatic hormone and strong antioxidant having evolved in all plants and animals over the millennia. In vertebrates, MLT is normally produced by the pineal gland during the early morning hours of darkness, even in nocturnal animals, and is suppressed by exposure to LAN. Daily entrainment of the human circadian clock is important for good human health. These studies suggest that the proper use and color of indoor and outdoor lighting is important to the health of both humans and ecosystems. Lighting fixtures should be designed to minimize interference with normal circadian rhythms in plants and animals. New discoveries on blue-light-sensitive retinal ganglion cell light receptors that control the circadian clock and how those receptors relate to today's modern high intensity discharge (HID) lamps are discussed. There is a brief discussion of circadian rhythms and light pollution. With the precautionary principle in mind, practical suggestions are offered for better indoor and outdoor lighting practices designed to safeguard human health.
Address spauley@cox-internet.com
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ISSN 0306-9877 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:15325001 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 792
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Author Kamrowski, R.L.; Sutton, S.G.; Tobin, R.C.; Hamann, M.
Title Potential applicability of persuasive communication to light-glow reduction efforts: a case study of marine turtle conservation Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal Environ Manage
Volume 54 Issue 3 Pages (down) 583-595
Keywords Society; Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Animals; *Conservation of Natural Resources; Culture; Female; Humans; *Lighting; Male; Middle Aged; Persuasive Communication; Public Opinion; Queensland; Questionnaires; *Turtles; Young Adult
Abstract Artificial lighting along coastlines poses a significant threat to marine turtles due to the importance of light for their natural orientation at the nesting beach. Effective lighting management requires widespread support and participation, yet engaging the public with light reduction initiatives is difficult because benefits associated with artificial lighting are deeply entrenched within modern society. We present a case study from Queensland, Australia, where an active light-glow reduction campaign has been in place since 2008 to protect nesting turtles. Semi-structured questionnaires explored community beliefs about reducing light and evaluated the potential for using persuasive communication techniques based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to increase engagement with light reduction. Respondents (n = 352) had moderate to strong intentions to reduce light. TPB variables explained a significant proportion of variance in intention (multiple regression: R (2) = 0.54-0.69, P < 0.001), but adding a personal norm variable improved the model (R (2) = 0.73-0.79, P < 0.001). Significant differences in belief strength between campaign compliers and non-compliers suggest that targeting the beliefs reducing light leads to “increased protection of local turtles” (P < 0.01) and/or “benefits to the local economy” (P < 0.05), in combination with an appeal to personal norms, would produce the strongest persuasion potential for future communications. Selective legislation and commitment strategies may be further useful strategies to increase community light reduction. As artificial light continues to gain attention as a pollutant, our methods and findings will be of interest to anyone needing to manage public artificial lighting.
Address School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, 4811, Australia, ruth.kamrowski(at)my.jcu.edu.au
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0364-152X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24957580 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1283
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