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Author Behar-Cohen, F.; Martinsons, C.; Vienot, F.; Zissis, G.; Barlier-Salsi, A.; Cesarini, J.P.; Enouf, O.; Garcia, M.; Picaud, S.; Attia, D.
Title Light-emitting diodes (LED) for domestic lighting: any risks for the eye? Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Progress in Retinal and eye Research Abbreviated Journal Prog Retin Eye Res
Volume 30 Issue (down) 4 Pages 239-257
Keywords Animals; Biomass; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Environmental Exposure; Eye Diseases/*etiology/pathology/physiopathology; Humans; *Light/adverse effects; Lighting/*methods; Reflex, Pupillary/physiology; Retina/pathology; Risk Assessment; *Semiconductors; Time Factors
Abstract Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are taking an increasing place in the market of domestic lighting because they produce light with low energy consumption. In the EU, by 2016, no traditional incandescent light sources will be available and LEDs may become the major domestic light sources. Due to specific spectral and energetic characteristics of white LEDs as compared to other domestic light sources, some concerns have been raised regarding their safety for human health and particularly potential harmful risks for the eye. To conduct a health risk assessment on systems using LEDs, the French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety (ANSES), a public body reporting to the French Ministers for ecology, for health and for employment, has organized a task group. This group consisted physicists, lighting and metrology specialists, retinal biologist and ophthalmologist who have worked together for a year. Part of this work has comprised the evaluation of group risks of different white LEDs commercialized on the French market, according to the standards and found that some of these lights belonged to the group risk 1 or 2. This paper gives a comprehensive analysis of the potential risks of white LEDs, taking into account pre-clinical knowledge as well as epidemiologic studies and reports the French Agency's recommendations to avoid potential retinal hazards.
Address Inserm UMRS 872, Physiopathology of Ocular Diseases: Therapeutic Innovations, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Paris, France. Francine.behar-cohen@crc.jussieur.fr
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1350-9462 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21600300 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 240
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Author Elvidge, C.D.; Keith, D.M.; Tuttle, B.T.; Baugh, K.E.
Title Spectral identification of lighting type and character Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) Abbreviated Journal Sensors (Basel)
Volume 10 Issue (down) 4 Pages 3961-3988
Keywords Led; Nightsat; lighting efficiency; lighting types; nighttime lights; photopic band
Abstract We investigated the optimal spectral bands for the identification of lighting types and the estimation of four major indices used to measure the efficiency or character of lighting. To accomplish these objectives we collected high-resolution emission spectra (350 to 2,500 nm) for forty-three different lamps, encompassing nine of the major types of lamps used worldwide. The narrow band emission spectra were used to simulate radiances in eight spectral bands including the human eye photoreceptor bands (photopic, scotopic, and “meltopic”) plus five spectral bands in the visible and near-infrared modeled on bands flown on the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM). The high-resolution continuous spectra are superior to the broad band combinations for the identification of lighting type and are the standard for calculation of Luminous Efficacy of Radiation (LER), Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) and Color Rendering Index (CRI). Given the high cost that would be associated with building and flying a hyperspectral sensor with detection limits low enough to observe nighttime lights we conclude that it would be more feasible to fly an instrument with a limited number of broad spectral bands in the visible to near infrared. The best set of broad spectral bands among those tested is blue, green, red and NIR bands modeled on the band set flown on the Landsat Thematic Mapper. This set provides low errors on the identification of lighting types and reasonable estimates of LER and CCT when compared to the other broad band set tested. None of the broad band sets tested could make reasonable estimates of Luminous Efficacy (LE) or CRI. The photopic band proved useful for the estimation of LER. However, the three photoreceptor bands performed poorly in the identification of lighting types when compared to the bands modeled on the Landsat Thematic Mapper. Our conclusion is that it is feasible to identify lighting type and make reasonable estimates of LER and CCT using four or more spectral bands with minimal spectral overlap spanning the 0.4 to 1.0 um region.
Address Earth Observation Group, Solar and Terrestrial Division, NOAA National Geophysical Data Center, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, USA. chris.elvidge@noaa.gov
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22319336; PMCID:PMC3274255 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 275
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Author Gaston, K.J.; Bennie, J.
Title Demographic effects of artificial nighttime lighting on animal populations Type Book Chapter
Year 2014 Publication Environmental Reviews Abbreviated Journal Environ. Rev.
Volume 22 Issue (down) 4 Pages 323-330
Keywords diurnal; lighting; night; nocturnal; light pollution; light at night; Photoperiodism; demography; demographics; population dynamics
Abstract Artificial lighting, especially but not exclusively through street lights, has transformed the nighttime environment in much of the world. Impacts have been identified across multiple levels of biological organization and process. The influences, however, on population dynamics, particularly through the combined effects on the key demographic rates (immigration, births, deaths, emigration) that determine where individual species occur and in what numbers, have not previously been well characterized. The majority of attention explicitly on demographic parameters to date has been placed on the attraction of organisms to lights, and thus effectively local immigration, the large numbers of individuals that can be involved, and then to some extent the mortality that can often result. Some of the most important influences of nighttime lighting, however, are likely more subtle and less immediately apparent to the human observer. Particularly significant are effects of nighttime lighting on demography that act through (i) circadian clocks and photoperiodism and thence on birth rates; (ii) time partitioning and thence on death rates; and (iii) immigration/emigration through constraining the movements of individuals amongst habitat networks, especially as a consequence of continuously lit linear features such as roads and footpaths. Good model organisms are required to enable the relative consequences of such effects to be effectively determined, and a wider consideration of the effects of artificial light at night is needed in demographic studies across a range of species.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9EZ, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Canadian Science Publishing Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1181-8700 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 317
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Author Sweater-Hickcox, K.; Narendran, N.; Bullough, J.; Freyssinier, J.
Title Effect of different coloured luminous surrounds on LED discomfort glare perception Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research and Technology
Volume 45 Issue (down) 4 Pages 464-475
Keywords perception; subjective; LED; LED lighting; spectral power distribution; SPD
Abstract Recently, there has been increased interest in energy-efficient lighting as energy resources become higher in demand. Anecdotal evidence suggests that certain populations believe light-emitting diodes (LED) produce more glare than traditional technologies. This may be due to a number of factors such as spectral power distribution (SPD), source luminance, or beam intensity distribution. A study was conducted to assess the effect of different SPDs on the perception of discomfort glare from an LED source. For the range of conditions evaluated, the presence of any luminous surround significantly reduced the perception of discomfort glare from the LED array. The blue luminous surround reduced discomfort glare perception significantly less than the white or the yellow luminous surrounds. The implications for solid-state lighting systems are discussed.
Address Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 338
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Author Hölker, F.; Moss, T.; Griefahn, B.; Kloas, W.; Voigt, C.; et al.
Title The Dark Side of Light: A Transdisciplinary Research Agenda for Light Pollution Policy Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Ecol Soc Abbreviated Journal
Volume 15 Issue (down) 4 Pages
Keywords Ecology; artificial light; energy efficiency; lighting concept; light pollution; nightscape; policy; sustainability; transdisciplinary
Abstract Although the invention and widespread use of artificial light is clearly one of the most important human technological advances, the transformation of nightscapes is increasingly recognized as having adverse effects. Night lighting may have serious physiological consequences for humans, ecological and evolutionary implications for animal and plant populations, and may reshape entire ecosystems. However, knowledge on the adverse effects of light pollution is vague. In response to climate change and energy shortages, many countries, regions, and communities are developing new lighting programs and concepts with a strong focus on energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions. Given the dramatic increase in artificial light at night (0 – 20% per year, depending on geographic region), we see an urgent need for light pollution policies that go beyond energy efficiency to include human well-being, the structure and functioning of ecosystems, and inter-related socioeconomic consequences. Such a policy shift will require a sound transdisciplinary understanding of the significance of the night, and its loss, for humans and the natural systems upon which we depend. Knowledge is also urgently needed on suitable lighting technologies and concepts which are ecologically, socially, and economically sustainable. Unless managing darkness becomes an integral part of future conservation and lighting policies, modern society may run into a global self-experiment with unpredictable outcomes.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 478
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