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Author West, K.E.; Jablonski, M.R.; Warfield, B.; Cecil, K.S.; James, M.; Ayers, M.A.; Maida, J.; Bowen, C.; Sliney, D.H.; Rollag, M.D.; Hanifin, J.P.; Brainard, G.C.
Title Blue light from light-emitting diodes elicits a dose-dependent suppression of melatonin in humans Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) Abbreviated Journal J Appl Physiol (1985)
Volume 110 Issue 3 Pages 619-626
Keywords (up) Circadian Rhythm/*physiology/*radiation effects; Color; Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation; Humans; Lighting/*methods; Melatonin/*blood; Metabolic Clearance Rate/radiation effects; Photic Stimulation/*methods; Radiation Dosage; Retina/*physiology/*radiation effects; Semiconductors; Young Adult; blue light
Abstract Light suppresses melatonin in humans, with the strongest response occurring in the short-wavelength portion of the spectrum between 446 and 477 nm that appears blue. Blue monochromatic light has also been shown to be more effective than longer-wavelength light for enhancing alertness. Disturbed circadian rhythms and sleep loss have been described as risk factors for astronauts and NASA ground control workers, as well as civilians. Such disturbances can result in impaired alertness and diminished performance. Prior to exposing subjects to short-wavelength light from light-emitting diodes (LEDs) (peak lambda = 469 nm; 1/2 peak bandwidth = 26 nm), the ocular safety exposure to the blue LED light was confirmed by an independent hazard analysis using the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists exposure limits. Subsequently, a fluence-response curve was developed for plasma melatonin suppression in healthy subjects (n = 8; mean age of 23.9 +/- 0.5 years) exposed to a range of irradiances of blue LED light. Subjects with freely reactive pupils were exposed to light between 2:00 and 3:30 AM. Blood samples were collected before and after light exposures and quantified for melatonin. The results demonstrate that increasing irradiances of narrowband blue-appearing light can elicit increasing plasma melatonin suppression in healthy subjects (P < 0.0001). The data were fit to a sigmoidal fluence-response curve (R(2) = 0.99; ED(50) = 14.19 muW/cm(2)). A comparison of mean melatonin suppression with 40 muW/cm(2) from 4,000 K broadband white fluorescent light, currently used in most general lighting fixtures, suggests that narrow bandwidth blue LED light may be stronger than 4,000 K white fluorescent light for suppressing melatonin.
Address Dept. of Neurology, Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107, USA
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0161-7567 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:21164152 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 287
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Author John D. Bullough
Title Opinion: Will road lighting wither? Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 49 Issue Pages 672
Keywords (up) Commentary; Lighting
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Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1761
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Author Zielinska-Dabkowska, K.M.; Schieck, A.F.
Title Designing digital displays and interactive media in today’s cities by night. Do we know enough about attracting attention to do so? Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Conscious Cities Anthology Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords (up) Commentary; Lighting
Abstract With the huge transformation in the development of digital screen technology and its consistently decreasing cost, digital billboards are progressively replacing traditional static, two-dimensional poster advertisements in our cities1. Previously, due to the substantial expenditure involved, they were only available to major international brands with vast promotional resources to build their brand fame. Today, however, they are being used increasingly by advertisers to deliver all kinds of messages from simple ones to more sophisticated, interactive storytelling. Soon, however, even newer ways of purchasing advertisements using computers will be introduced by the outdoor media industry to address the public, so potentially everybody will be able to rent out available advertising space and communicate the message. But are we ready for this next step? As there are no proper guidelines or regulations in place for this new medium in the urban realm, today we are facing issues such as no integration of the display’s location into the built environment, no specifications based on knowledge of human perception and the human centric design approach, no control over its content quality, and so called ‘display blindness’2 seems to be a common collective urban experience at night. Taking London as one of the most cutting-edge outdoor digital advertising environments in the world3 (with the largest number of these screens traditionally located in or in close proximity to Piccadilly Circus) this paper discusses various aspects of this new medium. Besides the layout and geometry of the space, it also focuses on navigation and attracting the visual attention of passers-by at night in a practical human oriented context. Additionally, questions regarding complex sensory, social, special and interactional issues and the necessity for interdisciplinary collaboration have been addressed.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2351
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Author Zielinska-Dabkowska, K.M.
Title Make lighting healthier Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume 553 Issue 7688 Pages 274-276
Keywords (up) Commentary; Lighting; Human Health
Abstract Artificial illumination can stop us sleeping and make us ill. We need fresh strategies and technologies, argues Karolina M. Zielinska-Dabkowska.
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ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2932
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Author Boyce, P.R.
Title The Present and Future of Lighting Research Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication SDAR* Journal of Sustainable Design & Applied Research Abbreviated Journal
Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages
Keywords (up) Commentary; Lighting; Vision; Human Health
Abstract The aim of this paper is to consider where lighting research is today and what its future might be. There is little doubt that, today, lighting research is an active field. A brief review of the topics being studied reveals that they range from residual studies on visibility and visual discomfort, through attempts to identify the influence of lighting on factors beyond visibility such as mood and behaviour, to the whole new field of light and health. But activity alone is not enough to justify a future. For lighting research to have a future it is necessary for it to

be influential. To become influential, research needs to focus its attention on outcomes that matter to people and the elements of those outcomes on which lighting is known to have a major influence. Further, researchers will have to be determined to overcome the barriers to changing lighting practice. By doing this, lighting research may change the world for the better, to be an important topic, not an irrelevance.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2113
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