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Author Edison, T.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Success of the Electric Light Type Magazine Article
  Year 1880 Publication The North American Review Abbreviated Journal N. American Rev.  
  Volume 131 Issue 287 Pages 295-300  
  Keywords Society; history; artificial light; Lighting  
  Abstract (none)  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher University of Northern Iowa Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (down) English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1272  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kamrowski, R.L.; Sutton, S.G.; Tobin, R.C.; Hamann, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Potential applicability of persuasive communication to light-glow reduction efforts: a case study of marine turtle conservation Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal Environ Manage  
  Volume 54 Issue 3 Pages 583-595  
  Keywords Society; Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Animals; *Conservation of Natural Resources; Culture; Female; Humans; *Lighting; Male; Middle Aged; Persuasive Communication; Public Opinion; Queensland; Questionnaires; *Turtles; Young Adult  
  Abstract Artificial lighting along coastlines poses a significant threat to marine turtles due to the importance of light for their natural orientation at the nesting beach. Effective lighting management requires widespread support and participation, yet engaging the public with light reduction initiatives is difficult because benefits associated with artificial lighting are deeply entrenched within modern society. We present a case study from Queensland, Australia, where an active light-glow reduction campaign has been in place since 2008 to protect nesting turtles. Semi-structured questionnaires explored community beliefs about reducing light and evaluated the potential for using persuasive communication techniques based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to increase engagement with light reduction. Respondents (n = 352) had moderate to strong intentions to reduce light. TPB variables explained a significant proportion of variance in intention (multiple regression: R (2) = 0.54-0.69, P < 0.001), but adding a personal norm variable improved the model (R (2) = 0.73-0.79, P < 0.001). Significant differences in belief strength between campaign compliers and non-compliers suggest that targeting the beliefs reducing light leads to “increased protection of local turtles” (P < 0.01) and/or “benefits to the local economy” (P < 0.05), in combination with an appeal to personal norms, would produce the strongest persuasion potential for future communications. Selective legislation and commitment strategies may be further useful strategies to increase community light reduction. As artificial light continues to gain attention as a pollutant, our methods and findings will be of interest to anyone needing to manage public artificial lighting.  
  Address School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, 4811, Australia, ruth.kamrowski(at)my.jcu.edu.au  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (down) English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0364-152X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24957580 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1283  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hadi, K.; DuBose, J.R.; Ryherd, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lighting and Nurses at Medical-Surgical Units: Impact of Lighting Conditions on Nurses' Performance and Satisfaction Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Herd Abbreviated Journal Herd  
  Volume 9 Issue 3 Pages 17-30  
  Keywords psychology; lighting  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the perception of nurses about their lighting environment at medical-surgical hospital units in order to understand areas of improvement for lighting at these units. BACKGROUND: The bulk of the research about nurses and lighting is focused on nighttime nursing, exploring the disruptions of nurses' circadian rhythm and maintaining alertness. The understanding of nurses' perception about lighting and its impact on nurses' task performance and patient examination remains imprecise. METHODS: This study used an online survey to ask a set of questions about lighting in medical-surgical units at five key locations including centralized nurse stations, decentralized nurse stations (DCNS), patient bedsides, patient bathrooms, and corridors from 393 survey participants. It then explored the survey findings in more depth through conducting focus groups with eight volunteer nurses. RESULTS: Lighting conditions at patient besides and DCNSs were significantly less desirable for nurses compared to other locations. A significant relationship between nurses' access to lighting controls (switches and dimmers) and satisfaction about the lighting environment was found. No significant relationship was observed between the individual characteristics of nurses (such as age, years of experience, etc.) and findings of this study. CONCLUSIONS: Thoughtful design of the lighting environment can improve nurses' satisfaction and perception about their working environment.  
  Address University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Omaha, NE, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (down) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1937-5867 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26370449 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1298  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jin, H.; Jin, S.; Chen, L.; Cen, S.; Yuan, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Research on the Lighting Performance of LED Street Lights With Different Color Temperatures Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication IEEE Photonics Journal Abbreviated Journal IEEE Photonics J.  
  Volume 7 Issue 6 Pages 1-9  
  Keywords Lighting; LED; light-emitting diodes; PC-LED; dark adaption; color perception; fog; skyglow  
  Abstract While light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are a very efficient lighting option, whether phosphor-coated LEDs (PC-LEDs) are suitable for street lighting remains to be tested. Correlated color temperature (CCT), mesopic vision illuminance, dark adaption, color perception, fog penetration, and skyglow pollution are important factors that determine alight's suitability for street lighting. In this paper, we have closely examined the lighting performance of LED street lights with different color temperatures and found that low-color-temperature (around 3000 K) PC-LEDs are more suitable for street lighting.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher IEEE Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (down) English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1943-0655 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1307  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Escofet, J.; Bará, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reducing the circadian input from self-luminous devices using hardware filters and software applications Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Res. & Tech.  
  Volume 49 Issue 4 Pages 481-496  
  Keywords Lighting; devices; circadian disruption; screens; self-luminous  
  Abstract The widespread use of self-luminous devices at nighttime (cell-phones, computers, and tablets) raises some reasonable concerns regarding their effects on human physiology. Light at night is a known circadian disruptor, particularly at short visible wavelengths, and it seems advisable to have practical tools for tailoring the spectral radiance of these displays. We analyse two possible strategies to achieve this goal, using hardware filters or software applications. Overall, software applications seem to offer, at the present time, the best trade-offs for controlling the light spectra emitted by existing devices. We submit that such tools should be included as a standard feature on any self-luminous device and that their default settings should be established according to the best available knowledge on the circadian effects of light.  
  Address Departament d'Ã’ptica i Optometria, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Terrassa, Catalunya, Spain; salva.bara(at)usc.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (down) English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1315  
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