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Author Boyce, P.R.
Title The Present and Future of Lighting Research Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (down) SDAR* Journal of Sustainable Design & Applied Research Abbreviated Journal
Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages
Keywords Commentary; Lighting; Vision; Human Health
Abstract The aim of this paper is to consider where lighting research is today and what its future might be. There is little doubt that, today, lighting research is an active field. A brief review of the topics being studied reveals that they range from residual studies on visibility and visual discomfort, through attempts to identify the influence of lighting on factors beyond visibility such as mood and behaviour, to the whole new field of light and health. But activity alone is not enough to justify a future. For lighting research to have a future it is necessary for it to

be influential. To become influential, research needs to focus its attention on outcomes that matter to people and the elements of those outcomes on which lighting is known to have a major influence. Further, researchers will have to be determined to overcome the barriers to changing lighting practice. By doing this, lighting research may change the world for the better, to be an important topic, not an irrelevance.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2113
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Author Skeldon, A.C.; Phillips, A.J.K.; Dijk, D.-J.
Title The effects of self-selected light-dark cycles and social constraints on human sleep and circadian timing: a modeling approach Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (down) Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 7 Issue Pages 45158
Keywords human health, lighting
Abstract Why do we go to sleep late and struggle to wake up on time? Historically, light-dark cycles were dictated by the solar day, but now humans can extend light exposure by switching on artificial lights. We use a mathematical model incorporating effects of light, circadian rhythmicity and sleep homeostasis to provide a quantitative theoretical framework to understand effects of modern patterns of light consumption on the human circadian system. The model shows that without artificial light humans wakeup at dawn. Artificial light delays circadian rhythmicity and preferred sleep timing and compromises synchronisation to the solar day when wake-times are not enforced. When wake-times are enforced by social constraints, such as work or school, artificial light induces a mismatch between sleep timing and circadian rhythmicity ('social jet-lag'). The model implies that developmental changes in sleep homeostasis and circadian amplitude make adolescents particularly sensitive to effects of light consumption. The model predicts that ameliorating social jet-lag is more effectively achieved by reducing evening light consumption than by delaying social constraints, particularly in individuals with slow circadian clocks or when imposed wake-times occur after sunrise. These theory-informed predictions may aid design of interventions to prevent and treat circadian rhythm-sleep disorders and social jet-lag.
Address University of Surrey, Surrey Sleep Research Centre, Guildford, GU2 7XP, UK
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ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:28345624 Approved no
Call Number SU @ spitschan @ Serial 1638
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Author Yoon, H.C.; Oh, J.H.; Lee, S.; Park, J.B.; Do, Y.R.
Title Circadian-tunable Perovskite Quantum Dot-based Down-Converted Multi-Package White LED with a Color Fidelity Index over 90 Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (down) Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 2808
Keywords Lighting
Abstract New metrics of the color and circadian performances of down-converted white light-emitting diodes (DC-WLEDs) are rapidly becoming popular in smart lighting systems. This is due to the increased desire for accurate analytical methods to measure the effects of newly developed quantum dot (QD)-based lighting on the vision, color, and circadian sensors of retina cells in the human eye. In this regard, a two-measure system known as technical memorandum TM-30-2015 (Illuminating Engineering Society of North America), encompassing the color fidelity index (CFI, R f ) and the color gamut index (CGI, R g ), has been developed as a new metrics of color to replace the currently utilized color rendering index (CRI, R a ). In addition, the tunability of the circadian efficacy of radiation (CER) is now more important due to its effect on the control of melatonin suppression/secretion, resetting of the central/local clocks of individuals given their daily cycles, and benefits to human health. In this paper, we developed and analyzed six-colored perovskite (Pe; cyan, green, yellowish green, amber, orange, and red colors) QDs-based multi-package WLED, and optimized the SPDs of tunable PeQD-based multi-package WLEDs in terms of promising human-centric lighting device, given its optimized visual energy, color qualities and health-promoting effects.
Address Department of Chemistry, Kookmin University, Seoul, 136-702, Republic of Korea. yrdo@kookmin.ac.kr
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ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:28584229; PMCID:PMC5459832 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1667
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Author Lin, J.; Ding, X.; Hong, C.; Pang, Y.; Chen, L.; Liu, Q.; Zhang, X.; Xin, H.; Wang, X.
Title Several biological benefits of the low color temperature light-emitting diodes based normal indoor lighting source Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (down) Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 7560
Keywords Human Health; Lighting
Abstract Currently, light pollution has become a nonnegligible issue in our daily life. Artificial light sources with high color temperature were deem to be the major pollution source, which could induce several adverse effects on human's health. In our previous research, we have firstly developed an artificial indoor light with low color temperature (1900 K). However, the biological effects of this artificial light on human's health are unclear. Here, four artificial lights (1900 K, 3000 K, 4000 K and 6600 K) were used to evaluate some biological changes in both human (in total 152 person-times) and murine models. Compared with other three high color temperature artificial lights, our lights (1900 K) presented a positive effect on promoting the secreting of melatonin and glutamate, protecting human's eyes, accelerating would healing and hair regeneration. These systematical studies indicated that the proposed low color temperature (1900 K) light could provide several significant benefits in human's daily life.
Address The National Engineering Research Center for Bioengineering Drugs and the Technologies, Institute of Translational Medicine, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, 330031, China. wangxiaolei@ncu.edu.cn
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ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:31101840 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2501
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Author Takemura, Y.; Ito, M.; Shimizu, Y.; Okano, K.; Okano, T.
Title Adaptive light: a lighting control method aligned with dark adaptation of human vision Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (down) Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 11204
Keywords Human Health; Vision; Lighting
Abstract Light exposure before sleep causes a reduction in the quality and duration of sleep. In order to reduce these detrimental effects of light exposure, it is important to dim the light. However, dimming the light often causes inconvenience and can lower the quality of life (QOL). We therefore aimed to develop a lighting control method for use before going to bed, in which the illuminance of lights can be ramped down with less of a subjective feeling of changes in illuminance. We performed seven experiments in a double-blind, randomized crossover design. In each experiment, we compared two lighting conditions. We examined constant illuminance, linear dimming, and three monophasic and three biphasic exponential dimming, to explore the fast and slow increases in visibility that reflect the dark adaptation of cone and rod photoreceptors in the retina, respectively. Finally, we developed a biphasic exponential dimming method termed Adaptive Light 1.0. Adaptive Light 1.0 significantly prevented the misidentification seen in constant light and effectively suppressed perceptions of the illuminance change. This novel lighting method will help to develop new intelligent lighting instruments that reduce the negative effect of light on sleep and also lower energy consumption.
Address The Smart Life Science Institute, ACROSS, Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan. okano@waseda.jp
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:32641723; PMCID:PMC7343865 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3050
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