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Author Shimoda, M.; Honda, K.-ichiro
Title Insect reactions to light and its applications to pest management Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Applied Entomology and Zoology Abbreviated Journal Appl Entomol Zool
Volume 48 Issue 4 Pages 413-421
Keywords ultraviolet; light; Integrated pest management; Artificial lighting; Photoreception; Phototaxis; Light-emitting diode; *Lighting
Abstract Insects are able to see ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Nocturnal insects are often attracted to light sources that emit large amounts of UV radiation, and devices that exploit this behavior, such as light traps for forecasting pest outbreaks, and electric insect killers, have been developed. Some diurnal species are attracted to yellow; yellow pan traps are used for conducting surveys for pest outbreaks and yellow sticky plates are used for pest control. Lamps that give off yellow illumination have been used effectively to control the activity of nocturnal moths and thus reduce damage to fruit, vegetables, and flowers. Covering cultivation facilities with film that filters out near-UV radiation reduces the invasion of pests such as whiteflies and thrips into the facilities, thus reducing damage. Reflective material placed on cultivated land can control the approach of flying insects such as aphids. Future development and use of new light sources such as light-emitting diodes is anticipated for promoting integrated pest management.
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ISSN 0003-6862 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 110
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Author Ho, C.Y.; Lin, H.T.; Huang, K.Y.
Title A Study on Energy Saving and Light Pollution of LED Advertising Signs Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Applied Mechanics and Materials Abbreviated Journal Amm
Volume 121-126 Issue Pages 2979-2984
Keywords Advertising Sign; LED; Light Trespass; Luminance Limit; Saving Energy; Vertical Illuminance; *Lighting
Abstract Lighting advertising signs not only play an important role in outdoor lighting environment in Taiwan, but also become the main factor of energy consumption in urban areas at night. Light-emitting diode (LED) has been gradually used in advertising signs due to its advantages. However, in order to be conspicuous and legible in the daytime, signs that are excessively bright may result in considerable light pollution and energy waste at nighttime. Therefore, this research aims to measure the luminance of LED signs and traditional internally lighted signs, and analyze the light trespass from each signage. Based on the research results, the energy consumption from a LED full color screen is 12 times more than a traditional internally lighted sign per day. Statistically, all kinds of LED signs are much higher than traditional internally lighted signs in the percentage of excessive brightness and average luminance value. As for the light trespass, since the vertical illuminance on facade facing the signs increases with the increase of the sign area or the decrease of the distance between the sign and the facade, the vertical illuminance on facade facing the signs would exceed the limit of CIE even if the luminance of the signs achieves the standard of CIE in terms of the general conditions in Taiwan. This happens to LED full color screens in particular and thus results in considerable obtrusive light. To sum up, in order to reduce unnecessary energy consumption and improve the nighttime lighting quality for outdoor environment, this research recommends the luminance limitation for light dimming of LED advertising signs should refer to the zoning, time period, and sign area.
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ISSN 1662-7482 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 126
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Author Stevens, R.G.; Brainard, G.C.; Blask, D.E.; Lockley, S.W.; Motta, M.E.
Title Adverse health effects of nighttime lighting: comments on American Medical Association policy statement Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication American Journal of Preventive Medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Prev Med
Volume 45 Issue 3 Pages 343-346
Keywords American Medical Association; Cell Cycle/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; DNA Damage/physiology; *Health Policy; Humans; Lighting/*adverse effects; United States
Abstract The American Medical Association House of Delegates in June of 2012 adopted a policy statement on nighttime lighting and human health. This major policy statement summarizes the scientific evidence that nighttime electric light can disrupt circadian rhythms in humans and documents the rapidly advancing understanding from basic science of how disruption of circadian rhythmicity affects aspects of physiology with direct links to human health, such as cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, and metabolism. The human evidence is also accumulating, with the strongest epidemiologic support for a link of circadian disruption from light at night to breast cancer. There are practical implications of the basic and epidemiologic science in the form of advancing lighting technologies that better accommodate human circadian rhythmicity.
Address University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut 06030-6325, USA. bugs@uchc.edu
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ISSN 0749-3797 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:23953362 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 130
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Author Gooley, J.J.; Chamberlain, K.; Smith, K.A.; Khalsa, S.B.S.; Rajaratnam, S.M.W.; Van Reen, E.; Zeitzer, J.M.; Czeisler, C.A.; Lockley, S.W.
Title Exposure to room light before bedtime suppresses melatonin onset and shortens melatonin duration in humans Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab
Volume 96 Issue 3 Pages E463-72
Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Female; Humans; *Light; *Lighting; Male; Melatonin/*blood; Sleep/physiology; Time Factors; Young Adult
Abstract CONTEXT: Millions of individuals habitually expose themselves to room light in the hours before bedtime, yet the effects of this behavior on melatonin signaling are not well recognized. OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that exposure to room light in the late evening suppresses the onset of melatonin synthesis and shortens the duration of melatonin production. DESIGN: In a retrospective analysis, we compared daily melatonin profiles in individuals living in room light (<200 lux) vs. dim light (<3 lux). PATIENTS: Healthy volunteers (n = 116, 18-30 yr) were recruited from the general population to participate in one of two studies. SETTING: Participants lived in a General Clinical Research Center for at least five consecutive days. INTERVENTION: Individuals were exposed to room light or dim light in the 8 h preceding bedtime. OUTCOME MEASURES: Melatonin duration, onset and offset, suppression, and phase angle of entrainment were determined. RESULTS: Compared with dim light, exposure to room light before bedtime suppressed melatonin, resulting in a later melatonin onset in 99.0% of individuals and shortening melatonin duration by about 90 min. Also, exposure to room light during the usual hours of sleep suppressed melatonin by greater than 50% in most (85%) trials. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that room light exerts a profound suppressive effect on melatonin levels and shortens the body's internal representation of night duration. Hence, chronically exposing oneself to electrical lighting in the late evening disrupts melatonin signaling and could therefore potentially impact sleep, thermoregulation, blood pressure, and glucose homeostasis.
Address Division of Sleep Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 221 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. gmsjjg@nus.edu
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ISSN 0021-972X ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:21193540; PMCID:PMC3047226 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 139
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Author Vollmer, C.; Michel, U.; Randler, C.
Title Outdoor light at night (LAN) is correlated with eveningness in adolescents Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 29 Issue 4 Pages 502-508
Keywords Adolescent; *Adolescent Behavior/drug effects; Biological Clocks; Central Nervous System Stimulants/administration & dosage; *Circadian Rhythm/drug effects; Computers; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Germany; Humans; *Light; Lighting; Male; *Photic Stimulation; *Photoperiod; Questionnaires; *Sleep/drug effects; Television; Time Factors; Video Games; *Wakefulness/drug effects
Abstract External zeitgebers synchronize the human circadian rhythm of sleep and wakefulness. Humans adapt their chronotype to the day-night cycle, the strongest external zeitgeber. The human circadian rhythm shifts to evening-type orientation when daylight is prolonged into the evening and night hours by artificial light sources. Data from a survey of 1507 German adolescents covering questions about chronotype and electronic screen media use combined with nocturnal satellite image data suggest a relationship between chronotype and artificial nocturnal light. Adolescents living in brightly illuminated urban districts had a stronger evening-type orientation than adolescents living in darker and more rural municipalities. This result persisted when controlling for time use of electronic screen media, intake of stimulants, type of school, age, puberty status, time of sunrise, sex, and population density. Time spent on electronic screen media use-a source of indoor light at night-is also correlated with eveningness, as well as intake of stimulants, age, and puberty status, and, to a lesser degree, type of school and time of sunrise. Adequate urban development design and parents limiting adolescents' electronic screen media use in the evening could help to adjust adolescents' zeitgeber to early school schedules when they provide appropriate lighting conditions for daytime and for nighttime.
Address Department of Biology, University of Education Heidelberg, Germany. vollmer@ph-heidelberg.de
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ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:22214237 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 150
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